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Holy Rule for Dec. 21

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Michael, a skilled and intelligent attorney whose age is against him in hunting for new work, that he may find the job God wills for
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 21, 2004
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      Prayers, please, for Michael, a skilled and intelligent attorney whose age is against him in hunting for new work, that he may find the job God wills for him, and also prayers for his faith search. Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving for two beatifications announced: Ven. Charles de Foucauld will at last be beatified, as will Mother Marianne Cope, German born Franciscan of Syracuse, NY, who went to work with Fr. Damien and the lepers on Molokai and stayed there the rest of her life. Among those whose cause is advanced to Venerable is Father Michael Sopocko, spiritual director of St. Faustina, who did so much to get the Divine Mercy devotion known. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

      April 21, August 21, December 21
      Chapter 64: On Constituting an Abbess

      Once she has been constituted,
      let the Abbess always bear in mind
      what a burden she has undertaken
      and to whom she will have to give an account of her stewardship,
      and let her know that her duty is rather to profit her sisters
      than to preside over them.
      She must therefore be learned in the divine law,
      that she may have a treasure of knowledge
      from which to bring forth new things and old.
      She must be chaste, sober and merciful.
      Let her exalt mercy above judgment,
      that she herself may obtain mercy.
      She should hate vices;
      she should love the sisterhood.


      In administering correction
      she should act prudently and not go to excess,
      lest in seeking too eagerly to scrape off the rust
      she break the vessel.
      Let her keep her own frailty ever before her eyes
      and remember that the bruised reed must not be broken.
      By this we do not mean that she should allow vices to grow;
      on the contrary, as we have already said,
      she should eradicate them prudently and with charity,
      in the way which may seem best in each case.
      Let her study rather to be loved than to be feared.


      Let her not be excitable and worried,
      nor exacting and headstrong,
      nor jealous and over-suspicious;
      for then she is never at rest.


      In her commands let her be prudent and considerate;
      and whether the work which she enjoins
      concerns God or the world,
      let her be discreet and moderate,
      bearing in mind the discretion of holy Jacob, who said,
      "If I cause my flocks to be overdriven,
      they will all die in one day."
      Taking this, then, and other examples of discretion,
      the mother of virtues,
      let her so temper all things
      that the strong may have something to strive after,
      and the weak may not fall back in dismay.


      And especially let her keep this Rule in all its details,
      so that after a good ministry
      she may hear from the Lord what the good servant heard
      who gave the fellow-servants wheat in due season:
      "Indeed, I tell you, he will set that one over all his goods" (Matt.
      24:27).

      REFLECTION

      Anyone reading this would perhaps quite rightly think: "Wow! That's a
      pretty tall order to fill!" They would, of course, be right.

      Now for the clincher: this is not just a model for Abbots, but for
      all of us with any authority, in fact, for all of us period. This is
      the way Benedictines should treat others, seniors, juniors, all
      people. This Christ-like attitude ought to pervade every parent,
      teacher, boss, nurse and grocery clerk, all of us. For every one of
      us the model here is exquisite. Read it over and over and etch it
      into your very heart. This is St. Benedict at his best!

      "Now THAT," he said in an unusually short reflection, "is a REALLY
      tall order!" Sure is! You can only do it with grace, with prayer and
      God's all-merciful help.

      Love and prayers,

      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Madeline, the 18 month old for whom we prayed. Tumor at the base of her brain was not all removed, but chemo and radiation are not
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 21, 2005
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        Prayers, please, for Madeline, the 18 month old for whom we prayed. Tumor at the base of her brain was not all removed, but chemo and radiation are not feasible, so a second surgery is planned. Prayers for her parents, family and doctors, too. Prayers for Anastasia and her parents, her mental illness sometimes spirals out badly at this time of year. Prayers of Deo gratias that Jay was helped greatly by our prayers with his depression. Prayers for an older woman married to Alan, a very abusive husband, and for her worried family.

        Prayers for a particularly tragic family. The daughter, 21, died of a heroin overdose within the last two weeks. The mother died of the same cause yesterday, apparently without knowing about her daughter's death, as the mother was living on the streets. Father, though alive somewhere, apparently also has a drug problem. Ardent prayers for them all, and especially for happy deaths, that they may fully accept the all-merciful embrace of Jesus. How heartbreaking are some of the messes out of which we must ask God to save His people, but with God, all things are possible. He treasures our prayers for those sheep astray He loves so much.

        Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for all in the St. Wilfrid's School community, who raised double their goal of 500 pounds sterling UK/ US $845 to fund a clean water supply for TWO African villages, and for the people who will receive their gifts! We can make differences in this troubled world. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 21, August 21, December 21
        Chapter 64: On Constituting an Abbess

        Once she has been constituted,
        let the Abbess always bear in mind
        what a burden she has undertaken
        and to whom she will have to give an account of her stewardship,
        and let her know that her duty is rather to profit her sisters
        than to preside over them.
        She must therefore be learned in the divine law,
        that she may have a treasure of knowledge
        from which to bring forth new things and old.
        She must be chaste, sober and merciful.
        Let her exalt mercy above judgment,
        that she herself may obtain mercy.
        She should hate vices;
        she should love the sisterhood.


        In administering correction
        she should act prudently and not go to excess,
        lest in seeking too eagerly to scrape off the rust
        she break the vessel.
        Let her keep her own frailty ever before her eyes
        and remember that the bruised reed must not be broken.
        By this we do not mean that she should allow vices to grow;
        on the contrary, as we have already said,
        she should eradicate them prudently and with charity,
        in the way which may seem best in each case.
        Let her study rather to be loved than to be feared.


        Let her not be excitable and worried,
        nor exacting and headstrong,
        nor jealous and over-suspicious;
        for then she is never at rest.


        In her commands let her be prudent and considerate;
        and whether the work which she enjoins
        concerns God or the world,
        let her be discreet and moderate,
        bearing in mind the discretion of holy Jacob, who said,
        "If I cause my flocks to be overdriven,
        they will all die in one day."
        Taking this, then, and other examples of discretion,
        the mother of virtues,
        let her so temper all things
        that the strong may have something to strive after,
        and the weak may not fall back in dismay.


        And especially let her keep this Rule in all its details,
        so that after a good ministry
        she may hear from the Lord what the good servant heard
        who gave the fellow-servants wheat in due season:
        "Indeed, I tell you, he will set that one over all his goods" (Matt.
        24:27).

        REFLECTION

        Anyone reading this would perhaps quite rightly think: "Wow!
        That's a tall order to fill!" They would, of course, be right.

        Now for the clincher: this is not just a model for Abbots, but for
        all of us with any authority, in fact, for all of us period. This is
        the way Benedictines should treat others, seniors, juniors, all
        people. This Christ-like attitude ought to pervade every parent,
        teacher, boss, nurse and grocery clerk, all of us. For every one of
        us the model here is exquisite. Read it over and over and etch it
        into your very heart. This is St. Benedict at his best!

        Pay particular attention to the deceptively short paragraph about
        not being "excitable and worried," along with its other cautions. Its
        warning that such things mean we shall never be at rest is a very
        important one. Without such, rest, without a certain level of serenity
        and peace, the spiritual journey is very, very tough going, indeed.
        We badly need that restful serenity to focus on Christ and the tasks
        of our souls at hand.

        "Now THAT," he said in an unusually short reflection, "is a REALLY
        tall order!" Sure is! You can only do it with grace, with prayer and
        God's all-merciful help.

        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for Barbara, whom we prayed for yesterday: her surgeon s appointment has been moved up to Christmas week! Barbara
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 20, 2006
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          +PAX

          Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for Barbara, whom we prayed for yesterday:
          her surgeon's appointment has been moved up to Christmas week! Barbara
          observed in her post that prayer sure works fast! Prayers for Tom, very painful
          and severe sinus infections and problems which trigger migraines. Scheduled for
          surgery in Christmas week, but will have to get better to be able to have
          the operation. Prayers for Joan, mother of four small children, lung cancer,
          and for all her family, especially Evelyn, her Mom. Evelyn has already lost two
          sons, so this would be her third loss of a child and it is devastating to
          her. Prayers for Tom's Mom, Barbara, having eye surgery tomorrow. Prayers for
          Patty, and for her Mom's happy death and eternal rest. We prayed for Patty
          seven months ago, when she lost her husband, now she is burying her Mom just
          before Christmas. She has no children, just siblings, so she is quite alone in
          many ways. Prayers for Luana, possibly dying from kidney failure, and for Rob,
          her son, and all their family.

          Sr. Lany Jo's sister-in-law, Lolita, is being buried today. Robert, her
          husband, asks special prayers for the safety of the many folks traveling from
          great distances to her funeral, for the safe journeys coming and going. Prayers
          for the happy death and eternal rest of Maura, who died this morning, and
          prayers for her son, Rodger and her daughters. Prayers for all who have lost
          loved ones so close to the holidays, the challenge of getting through a
          celebrating world when one's own heart is breaking is not slight. Prayers for 3
          friends of one of our readers. One is facing a medical exam and needs reassurance,
          the other two, both 52 and both husbands and fathers have serious illnesses:
          one of them has cancer and the other has severe dementia praecox, unable to
          speak and barely recognizing people. Prayers for their families, too, and for
          their friends who want to help. Lord, help us all as You know and will.
          God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him!
          Thanks so much. JL

          April 21, August 21, December 21
          Chapter 64: On Constituting an Abbess

          Once she has been constituted,
          let the Abbess always bear in mind
          what a burden she has undertaken
          and to whom she will have to give an account of her stewardship,
          and let her know that her duty is rather to profit her sisters
          than to preside over them.
          She must therefore be learned in the divine law,
          that she may have a treasure of knowledge
          from which to bring forth new things and old.
          She must be chaste, sober and merciful.
          Let her exalt mercy above judgment,
          that she herself may obtain mercy.
          She should hate vices;
          she should love the sisterhood.


          In administering correction
          she should act prudently and not go to excess,
          lest in seeking too eagerly to scrape off the rust
          she break the vessel.
          Let her keep her own frailty ever before her eyes
          and remember that the bruised reed must not be broken.
          By this we do not mean that she should allow vices to grow;
          on the contrary, as we have already said,
          she should eradicate them prudently and with charity,
          in the way which may seem best in each case.
          Let her study rather to be loved than to be feared.


          Let her not be excitable and worried,
          nor exacting and headstrong,
          nor jealous and over-suspicious;
          for then she is never at rest.


          In her commands let her be prudent and considerate;
          and whether the work which she enjoins
          concerns God or the world,
          let her be discreet and moderate,
          bearing in mind the discretion of holy Jacob, who said,
          "If I cause my flocks to be overdriven,
          they will all die in one day."
          Taking this, then, and other examples of discretion,
          the mother of virtues,
          let her so temper all things
          that the strong may have something to strive after,
          and the weak may not fall back in dismay.


          And especially let her keep this Rule in all its details,
          so that after a good ministry
          she may hear from the Lord what the good servant heard
          who gave the fellow-servants wheat in due season:
          "Indeed, I tell you, he will set that one over all his goods" (Matt.
          24:27).

          REFLECTION

          Anyone reading this would perhaps quite rightly think: "Wow!
          That's a tall order to fill!" They would, of course, be right.

          Now for the clincher: this is not just a model for Abbots, but for
          all of us with any authority, in fact, for all of us period. This is
          the way Benedictines should treat others, seniors, juniors, all
          people. This Christ-like attitude ought to pervade every parent,
          teacher, boss, nurse and grocery clerk, all of us. For every one of
          us the model here is exquisite. Read it over and over and etch it
          into your very heart. This is St. Benedict at his best!

          Pay particular attention to the deceptively short paragraph about
          not being "excitable and worried," along with its other cautions. Its
          warning that such things mean we shall never be at rest is a very
          important one. Without such, rest, without a certain level of serenity
          and peace, the spiritual journey is very, very tough going, indeed.
          We badly need that restful serenity to focus on Christ and the tasks
          of our souls at hand.

          "Now THAT," he said in an unusually short reflection, "is a REALLY
          tall order!" Sure is! You can only do it with grace, with prayer and
          God's all-merciful help.

          Love and prayers,

          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, and for all who mourn them: Irene Adele Prayers, please for the spiritual, mental and
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 20, 2007
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            +PAX

            Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, and for all who mourn them:

            Irene

            Adele

            Prayers, please for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their families and all who take care of their needs:

            Paul and Mary, whose 10 year old Lab, Java, seems to have metastasizing cancer.

            Ryan, 17, hard drug addictions, arrested and hopefully will get into a treatment facility for teens, rather than jail for 6 months, and for George, trying to help him.

            Sr. Mary Stella, hospitalized, perhaps for the last time, for a happy death if God calls her this time and for her eternal rest.

            A church choir member being made very sick by her vertigo. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 21, August 21, December 21
            Chapter 64: On Constituting an Abbess

            Once she has been constituted,
            let the Abbess always bear in mind
            what a burden she has undertaken
            and to whom she will have to give an account of her stewardship,
            and let her know that her duty is rather to profit her sisters
            than to preside over them.
            She must therefore be learned in the divine law,
            that she may have a treasure of knowledge
            from which to bring forth new things and old.
            She must be chaste, sober and merciful.
            Let her exalt mercy above judgment,
            that she herself may obtain mercy.
            She should hate vices;
            she should love the sisterhood.


            In administering correction
            she should act prudently and not go to excess,
            lest in seeking too eagerly to scrape off the rust
            she break the vessel.
            Let her keep her own frailty ever before her eyes
            and remember that the bruised reed must not be broken.
            By this we do not mean that she should allow vices to grow;
            on the contrary, as we have already said,
            she should eradicate them prudently and with charity,
            in the way which may seem best in each case.
            Let her study rather to be loved than to be feared.


            Let her not be excitable and worried,
            nor exacting and headstrong,
            nor jealous and over-suspicious;
            for then she is never at rest.


            In her commands let her be prudent and considerate;
            and whether the work which she enjoins
            concerns God or the world,
            let her be discreet and moderate,
            bearing in mind the discretion of holy Jacob, who said,
            "If I cause my flocks to be overdriven,
            they will all die in one day."
            Taking this, then, and other examples of discretion,
            the mother of virtues,
            let her so temper all things
            that the strong may have something to strive after,
            and the weak may not fall back in dismay.


            And especially let her keep this Rule in all its details,
            so that after a good ministry
            she may hear from the Lord what the good servant heard
            who gave the fellow-servants wheat in due season:
            "Indeed, I tell you, he will set that one over all his goods" (Matt.
            24:27).

            REFLECTION

            Anyone reading this would perhaps quite rightly think: "Wow!
            That's a tall order to fill!" They would, of course, be right.

            Now for the clincher: this is not just a model for Abbots, but for
            all of us with any authority, in fact, for all of us period. This is
            the way Benedictines should treat others, seniors, juniors, all
            people. This Christ-like attitude ought to pervade every parent,
            teacher, boss, nurse and grocery clerk, all of us. For every one of
            us the model here is exquisite. Read it over and over and etch it
            into your very heart. This is St. Benedict at his best!

            Pay particular attention to the deceptively short paragraph about
            not being "excitable and worried," along with its other cautions. Its
            warning that such things mean we shall never be at rest is a very
            important one. Without such, rest, without a certain level of serenity
            and peace, the spiritual journey is very, very tough going, indeed.
            We badly need that restful serenity to focus on Christ and the tasks
            of our souls at hand.

            "Now THAT," he said in an unusually short reflection, "is a REALLY
            tall order!" Sure is! You can only do it with grace, with prayer and
            God's all-merciful help.

            Love and prayers,

            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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