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Holy Rule for Dec. 5

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Jan, a lot of problems, money, family, work, spiritual dryness and severe depression which immobilizes her. She REALLY needs to see a
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 5, 2004
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Jan, a lot of problems, money, family, work, spiritual dryness and severe depression which immobilizes her. She REALLY needs to see a doctor for some meds for this and lots of prayers. Also for Mike, a substance abuse counselor going for his Master's, who is also a husband and father. As finals approach and he tries to balance family, church, job and studies, he is very stressed. Prayers for his wife and kids, too! Prayers for Audrey and Linda, her Mom, too. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

      April 5, August 5, December 5
      Chapter 53: On the Reception of Guests

      Let there be a separate kitchen for the Abbot and guests,
      that the brethren may not be disturbed when guests,
      who are never lacking in a monastery,
      arrive at irregular hours.
      Let two brethren capable of filling the office well
      be appointed for a year to have charge of this kitchen.
      Let them be given such help as they need,
      that they may serve without murmuring.
      And on the other hand,
      when they have less to occupy them,
      let them go out to whatever work is assigned them.

      And not only in their case
      but in all the offices of the monastery
      let this arrangement be observed,
      that when help is needed it be supplied,
      and again when the workers are unoccupied
      they do whatever they are bidden.

      The guest house also shall be assigned to a brother
      whose soul is possessed by the fear of God.
      Let there be a sufficient number of beds made up in it;
      and let the house of God be managed by prudent men
      and in a prudent manner.

      On no account shall anyone who is not so ordered
      associate or converse with guests.
      But if he should meet them or see them,
      let him greet them humbly, as we have said,
      ask their blessing and pass on,
      saying that he is not allowed to converse with a guest.

      REFLECTION

      I am living proof that, when a monastery has to, it can get by with
      less than a guestmaster "possessed by the fear of God." Some
      days, "impressed by the fear of God" in others is about the best I
      can pull off. There are other days when I take comfort in the fact that the
      minimum the Holy Rule gives about the guest house itself is that there
      be a sufficient number of made-up beds and a kitchen of its own,
      because frills beyond that are not likely to be forthcoming! But I
      digress...

      Asking that the house of God be prudently governed by the prudent
      surely applies to more than the guest house. That principle goes for
      the whole monastery, as well as for the families and homes of those
      monastics in the world outside the cloister. This is not just another
      call to frugality or economy or order for their own sakes. We are
      Benedictines, we don't do ANYTHING for its own sake, except God!

      The important reason behind this prudence and care is that we ARE
      managing the House of God. All our Benedictine homes, our monasteries
      and our guesthouses are the Houses of God. The humblest one-room
      studio apartment of an Oblate is the House of God. How easily we forget
      that, how commonly (the adverb is no accident here!) we think of those
      places as solely our own!

      The whole idea of balance and peace and moderation and serenity is
      nothing more or less than a singular setting for a pearl of very
      great price. We need those things for our monastic struggle to be
      most effective. Sometimes a surgeon might have to operate on a bloody
      battlefield, but don't be surprised if infection follows. It's the
      same with us and dysfunctional, imprudent messes.

      We CAN operate there if we have to, but infections are likely. We
      need a certain amount of reduction of inconsequential hassles to
      focus on the one thing necessary. St. Benedict strives to provide us
      with that. No, the monastery is not a sterile surgical suite (and I
      always worry when one looks that way!) but neither is it an ill-
      housed flock of free range chickens. Show me a monastery or home that
      has become a zoo and I can guarantee you there will be a LOT of
      spiritual ramifications, as well.

      We are not necessarily Thomists (though if memory serves me properly,
      our Order conducted some of St. Thomas Aquinas' early schooling,) but
      we can surely affirm that "peace is the tranquility of order." St.
      Thomas' view of the virtues is important to us, too, imbued with the
      principles of Aristotle: "Virtus in media stat." Virtue stands in the
      middle way. What could be more Benedictinely moderate and balanced?

      It must be clearly remembered that when we speak of "prudence", we
      speak of a virtue, a thing of holiness and a golden mean. Not for
      nothing did our contemporary language get the unlovely title
      of "prude" from the same root. All manner of foolish timidity,
      cowardice, stinge and hearts-by-Frigidaire prudishness have been
      falsely named prudence.

      Prudence is not and never can be a wicked thing. Prudence, real
      wisdom, is a thing always to be desired. False prudence, on the other
      hand, of which there is sadly no shortage, is a thing always and
      everywhere to be rejected. Give such people a lot of room.

      False prudence and meanness of spirit, whatever else they
      may be, are windows into one's heart. The view is not always lovely
      and may require a lot of prayer, but one is better off to never
      follow such a troubled person. Just be kind and very, very careful!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for a dear priest friend of mine who seems near death, for his happy death and eternal rest. Prayers, too, for Inge, removal of an
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 5, 2005
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for a dear priest friend of mine who seems near death, for his happy death and eternal rest. Prayers, too, for Inge, removal of an inflamed cyst on her brain and for her husband, Ron, and all their family. Prayers for Tom, husband Asia, the niece of our Brother Bernard, and father of two children, aged 2 and 4. At 38, he has had a very severe heart attack and his condition is still very touch and go. Prayers for him and all the family, please. Prayers, too, for all the dying, so many of whom are alone, suffering unknown, and have no one to pray for them. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 5, August 5, December 5
        Chapter 53: On the Reception of Guests

        Let there be a separate kitchen for the Abbot and guests,
        that the brethren may not be disturbed when guests,
        who are never lacking in a monastery,
        arrive at irregular hours.
        Let two brethren capable of filling the office well
        be appointed for a year to have charge of this kitchen.
        Let them be given such help as they need,
        that they may serve without murmuring.
        And on the other hand,
        when they have less to occupy them,
        let them go out to whatever work is assigned them.

        And not only in their case
        but in all the offices of the monastery
        let this arrangement be observed,
        that when help is needed it be supplied,
        and again when the workers are unoccupied
        they do whatever they are bidden.

        The guest house also shall be assigned to a brother
        whose soul is possessed by the fear of God.
        Let there be a sufficient number of beds made up in it;
        and let the house of God be managed by prudent men
        and in a prudent manner.

        On no account shall anyone who is not so ordered
        associate or converse with guests.
        But if he should meet them or see them,
        let him greet them humbly, as we have said,
        ask their blessing and pass on,
        saying that he is not allowed to converse with a guest.

        REFLECTION

        I am living proof that, when a monastery has to, it can get by with
        less than a guestmaster "possessed by the fear of God." Some
        days, "impressed by the fear of God" in others is about the best I
        can pull off. There are other days when I take comfort in the fact that the
        minimum the Holy Rule gives about the guest house itself is that there
        be a sufficient number of made-up beds and a kitchen of its own,
        because frills beyond that are not likely to be forthcoming! But I
        digress...

        Asking that the house of God be prudently governed by the prudent
        surely applies to more than the guest house. That principle goes for
        the whole monastery, as well as for the families and homes of those
        monastics in the world outside the cloister. This is not just another
        call to frugality or economy or order for their own sakes. We are
        Benedictines, we don't do ANYTHING for its own sake, except God!

        The important reason behind this prudence and care is that we ARE
        managing the House of God. All our Benedictine homes, our monasteries
        and our guesthouses are the Houses of God. The humblest one-room
        studio apartment of an Oblate is the House of God. How easily we forget
        that, how commonly (the adverb is no accident here!) we think of those
        places as solely our own!

        The whole idea of balance and peace and moderation and serenity is
        nothing more or less than a singular setting for a pearl of very
        great price. We need those things for our monastic struggle to be
        most effective. Sometimes a surgeon might have to operate on a bloody
        battlefield, but don't be surprised if infection follows. It's the
        same with us and dysfunctional, imprudent messes.

        We CAN operate there if we have to, but infections are likely. We
        need a certain amount of reduction of inconsequential hassles to
        focus on the one thing necessary. St. Benedict strives to provide us
        with that. No, the monastery is not a sterile surgical suite (and I
        always worry when one looks that way!) but neither is it an ill-
        housed flock of free range chickens. Show me a monastery or home that
        has become a chaotic mess and I can guarantee you there will be a LOT of
        spiritual ramifications, as well.

        We are not necessarily Thomists (though if memory serves me properly,
        our Order conducted some of St. Thomas Aquinas' early schooling,) but
        we can surely affirm that "peace is the tranquility of order." St.
        Thomas' view of the virtues is important to us, too, imbued with the
        principles of Aristotle: "Virtus in media stat." Virtue stands in the
        middle way. What could be more Benedictinely moderate and balanced?

        It must be clearly remembered that when we speak of "prudence", we
        speak of a virtue, a thing of holiness and a golden mean. Not for
        nothing did our contemporary language get the unlovely title
        of "prude" from the same root. All manner of foolish timidity,
        cowardice, stinge and hearts-by-Frigidaire prudishness have been
        falsely named prudence.

        Prudence is not and never can be a wicked thing. Prudence, real
        wisdom, is a thing always to be desired. False prudence, on the other
        hand, of which there is sadly no shortage, is a thing always and
        everywhere to be rejected. Give such people a lot of room.

        False prudence and meanness of spirit, whatever else they
        may be, are windows into one's heart. The view is not always lovely
        and may require a lot of prayer, but one is better off to never
        follow the example of such a troubled person. Just be kind and
        very, very careful!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, for all their families and all who murn them: Joseph, a 10 year old who died this
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 4, 2007
          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, for all their families and all who murn them:

          Joseph, a 10 year old who died this weekend, and his family, especially his cousin Robert who is 18, new college freshman, still recovering from the death of his own father.

          Virginia, who died from cancer and especially for her cousin, Ramona, who asked prayers for her.

          Prayers for the spiritual, physical and mental health of the following, for all their families and for all who care for or treat them:

          Antonina, broken ankle, and her daughter, Mary Ann, who took a long time off work to care for her.

          for conversion and salvation of Doug, Gordon, Teddy, Samantha, Darci, George, Dianne, Patrick, Sullivan, Joe, Elizabeth , Guido, Guido jr., Tony, Elizabeth and George, John, Judith and Glen ,Darci, John, and Audy

          for John to get a good permanent job and for his marriage
          for Elizabeth company to get more jobs and that they will NOT
          lose their home.
          pray for Colleen for intentions, health and healing on her teeth.

          Rich, financial issues, for God's will for him.

          Please pray for Suheil, his wife Orit and their children in Jerusalem
          Please pray for Sandy Fisher, having surgery for ovarian cancer.

          Deo gratias for Rocco, he did well and is recovering from his surgery. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 5, August 5, December 5
          Chapter 53: On the Reception of Guests

          Let there be a separate kitchen for the Abbot and guests,
          that the brethren may not be disturbed when guests,
          who are never lacking in a monastery,
          arrive at irregular hours.
          Let two brethren capable of filling the office well
          be appointed for a year to have charge of this kitchen.
          Let them be given such help as they need,
          that they may serve without murmuring.
          And on the other hand,
          when they have less to occupy them,
          let them go out to whatever work is assigned them.

          And not only in their case
          but in all the offices of the monastery
          let this arrangement be observed,
          that when help is needed it be supplied,
          and again when the workers are unoccupied
          they do whatever they are bidden.

          The guest house also shall be assigned to a brother
          whose soul is possessed by the fear of God.
          Let there be a sufficient number of beds made up in it;
          and let the house of God be managed by prudent men
          and in a prudent manner.

          On no account shall anyone who is not so ordered
          associate or converse with guests.
          But if he should meet them or see them,
          let him greet them humbly, as we have said,
          ask their blessing and pass on,
          saying that he is not allowed to converse with a guest.

          REFLECTION

          I am living proof that, when a monastery has to, it can get by with
          less than a guestmaster "possessed by the fear of God." Some
          days, "impressed by the fear of God" in others is about the best I
          can pull off. There are other days when I take comfort in the fact
          that the
          minimum the Holy Rule gives about the guest house itself is that
          there
          be a sufficient number of made-up beds and a kitchen of its own,
          because frills beyond that are not likely to be forthcoming! But I
          digress...

          Asking that the house of God be prudently governed by the prudent
          surely applies to more than the guest house. That principle goes for
          the whole monastery, as well as for the families and homes of those
          monastics in the world outside the cloister. This is not just another
          call to frugality or economy or order for their own sakes. We are
          Benedictines, we don't do ANYTHING for its own sake, except God!

          The important reason behind this prudence and care is that we ARE
          managing the House of God. All our Benedictine homes, our monasteries
          and our guesthouses are the Houses of God. The humblest one-room
          studio apartment of an Oblate is the House of God. How easily we
          forget
          that, how commonly (the adverb is no accident here!) we think of
          those
          places as solely our own!

          The whole idea of balance and peace and moderation and serenity is
          nothing more or less than a singular setting for a pearl of very
          great price. We need those things for our monastic struggle to be
          most effective. Sometimes a surgeon might have to operate on a bloody
          battlefield, but don't be surprised if infection follows. It's the
          same with us and dysfunctional, imprudent messes.

          We CAN operate there if we have to, but infections are likely. We
          need a certain amount of reduction of inconsequential hassles to
          focus on the one thing necessary. St. Benedict strives to provide us
          with that. No, the monastery is not a sterile surgical suite (and I
          always worry when one looks that way!) but neither is it an ill-
          housed flock of free range chickens. Show me a monastery or home that
          has become a chaotic mess and I can guarantee you there will be a
          LOT of
          spiritual ramifications, as well.

          We are not necessarily Thomists (though if memory serves me properly,
          our Order conducted some of St. Thomas Aquinas' early schooling,) but
          we can surely affirm that "peace is the tranquility of order." St.
          Thomas' view of the virtues is important to us, too, imbued with the
          principles of Aristotle: "Virtus in media stat." Virtue stands in the
          middle way. What could be more Benedictinely moderate and balanced?

          It must be clearly remembered that when we speak of "prudence", we
          speak of a virtue, a thing of holiness and a golden mean. Not for
          nothing did our contemporary language get the unlovely title
          of "prude" from the same root. All manner of foolish timidity,
          cowardice, stinge and hearts-by-Frigidaire prudishness have been
          falsely named prudence.

          Prudence is not and never can be a wicked thing. Prudence, real
          wisdom, is a thing always to be desired. False prudence, on the other
          hand, of which there is sadly no shortage, is a thing always and
          everywhere to be rejected. Give such people a lot of room.

          False prudence and meanness of spirit, whatever else they
          may be, are windows into one's heart. The view is not always lovely
          and may require a lot of prayer, but one is better off to never
          follow the example of such a troubled person. Just be kind and
          very, very careful!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for a Religious who has lost her singing voice, which is very important to her ministry. Ardent prayers that she be healed and her voice restored.
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 4, 2016

            +PAX

             

            Prayers for a Religious who has lost her singing voice, which is very important to her ministry. Ardent prayers that she be healed and her voice restored. 

             

            Prayers for the eternal rest of Nick, who took his own life, and for his mother, Chrystal, his Stepdad, Paul, his father, Don, and all his family and all who mourn him.

             

            Prayers for Jeff and his wife, Sue. Jeff's parents Shirley and Pete are both suffering from dementia. Shirley has additional medical problems and is in the hospital, and Pete has just entered a nursing home. Jeff has a Christmas tree farm, and with the closure of several local tree farms, it is an extremely busy year. The heavy work-load and the stress regarding his parents is weighing heavily on him and Sue. Prayers for all concerned.

             

            Prayers for Lisa and her daughter, both injured in a head on collision, for a full and speedy recovery and that Lisa can get another car quickly, so she doesn’t lose her job.

             

            Prayers for the eternal rest of Eileen’s daughter-in-law’s father, who died on her birthday. She also lost her mother about a year ago, prayers for her ability to cope with this tragedy and prayers for all his family and all who mourn him.

             

            Prayers for Brian and his parents, Fred, who died 12/09/66, and Helen, who died 12/06/2002. May they rest in peace.

             

            Prayers please for Fr. Wm F. for a swift and effective recovery from his recent surgery. He is in a lot of pain, although he is not letting it stop him from doing double duty, and for the current pastor, Fr. J.S, who is currently not well and not able to be in residence for at least another month.

            Also, prayers for Robert N to have a happy, holy month in France visiting his sister and other old friends. When he returns, he will head straight to his first semester of his seminary studies.

            For Edward J., who requests prayers for his upcoming discernment stay for one month at Gethsemani Trappist Monastery.

            Prayers for Richenda, who has an ear problem, that she recovers her hearing and finds her way back to practicing the faith.

            Lord,
            help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
            God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 5, August 5, December 5
            Chapter 53: On the Reception of Guests

            Let there be a separate kitchen for the Abbot and guests,
            that the brethren may not be disturbed when guests,
            who are never lacking in a monastery,
            arrive at irregular hours.
            Let two brethren capable of filling the office well
            be appointed for a year to have charge of this kitchen.
            Let them be given such help as they need,
            that they may serve without murmuring.
            And on the other hand,
            when they have less to occupy them,
            let them go out to whatever work is assigned them.

            And not only in their case
            but in all the offices of the monastery
            let this arrangement be observed,
            that when help is needed it be supplied,
            and again when the workers are unoccupied
            they do whatever they are bidden.

            The guest house also shall be assigned to a brother
            whose soul is possessed by the fear of God.
            Let there be a sufficient number of beds made up in it;
            and let the house of God be managed by prudent men
            and in a prudent manner.

            On no account shall anyone who is not so ordered
            associate or converse with guests.
            But if he should meet them or see them,
            let him greet them humbly, as we have said,
            ask their blessing and pass on,
            saying that he is not allowed to converse with a guest.

            REFLECTION

            Asking that the house of God be prudently governed by the prudent
            surely applies to more than the guest house. That principle goes for
            the whole monastery, as well as for the families and homes of those
            monastics in the world outside the cloister. This is not just another
            call to frugality or economy or order for their own sakes. We are
            Benedictines, we don't do ANYTHING for its own sake, except God!

            The important reason behind this prudence and care is that we ARE
            managing the House of God. All our Benedictine homes, our monasteries
            and our guesthouses are the Houses of God. The humblest one-room
            studio apartment of an Oblate is the House of God. How easily we
            forget that, how commonly we think of those places as solely our own!

            The whole idea of balance and peace and moderation and serenity is
            nothing more or less than a singular setting for a pearl of very
            great price. We need those things for our monastic struggle to be
            most effective. Sometimes a surgeon might have to operate on a bloody
            battlefield, but don't be surprised if infection follows. It's the
            same with us and dysfunctional, imprudent situations.

            We CAN operate there if we have to, but infections are likely. We
            need a certain amount of reduction of inconsequential hassles to
            focus on the one thing necessary. St. Benedict strives to provide us
            with that. No, the monastery is not a sterile surgical suite (and I
            always worry when one looks that way!) but neither is it an ill-
            housed flock of free range chickens. Show me a monastery or home that
            has become a chaotic mess and I can bet you there will be a
            spiritual ramifications, as well.

            Drawing on the wisdom of St. Thomas Aquinas, (our Order conducted
            some of his early schooling at Monte Cassino,) we can surely
            affirm that "peace is the tranquility of order." St. Thomas' view of
            the virtues is important to us, too, imbued with the
            principles of Aristotle: "Virtus in media stat." Virtue stands in the
            middle way. What could be more Benedictinely moderate and balanced?

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org

            Petersham, MA 01366

             

             

             

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