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Holy Rule for Nov. 15

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Anastasia, 14, serious, out of control mental problems, and for her parents, George and Ann Marie, also for Terri, MS, who has a mass
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 15, 2004
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Anastasia, 14, serious, out of control mental problems, and for her parents, George and Ann Marie, also for Terri, MS, who has a mass on her breast and some ovarian masses as well, surgery and biopsy for the breast on Wednesday, also for Siobahn, who has lost her dog, Nala. Some heavy prayers to St. Anthony that Nala returns home. Prayers, too, for Ralph, Parkinson's and a grand mal seizure, he has troubles with faith and his wife needs extra prayers, too. God's will is best. ALl is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

      March 16, July 16, November 15
      Chapter 37: On the Old and Children

      Although human nature itself is drawn to special kindness
      towards these times of life,
      that is towards the old and children,
      still the authority of the Rule should also provide for them.


      Let their weakness be always taken into account,
      and let them by no means be held to the rigor of the Rule
      with regard to food.
      On the contrary,
      let a kind consideration be shown to them,
      and let them eat before the regular hours.

      REFLECTION

      Many modern minds would find monasticism itself, including our Holy
      Rule to be a harsh and inflexible thing. Sadly, many cranky,
      curmudgeonly monastics who have missed the mark make those same
      assumptions at times! We are not at all the heartless discipline of a
      sort imagined by many.

      This chapter, on the old and children, as well as in many other
      places, such as the references to those who require more material
      things and the care of the sick are highlights of Benedictinism's
      faceted gem: personalism. St. Benedict sees persons as they are,
      where they are. He meets them at many different points on the road to
      monastic life, even within the monastery itself. He urges us to do
      the same. He also calls all whom he meets at all of those
      points "beginners", lest any of us become proud or think ourselves
      better than the weak lamb he goes after.

      The Holy Rule bends and twists and stoops to make many allowances for
      many different sorts of weakness. In doing so, it clearly shows the
      loving father's heart of the man who wrote its Prologue in such
      tender terms.

      The tenderness of St. Benedict shines through here. These are strong
      words for weakness: "ALWAYS taken into account," and "BY NO MEANS
      held to the rigor of the Rule for food." Though he prefaces his
      chapter recalling that any healthy human nature has a certain level
      of consideration for these age groups, our holy Father Benedict
      quickly returns to a very consistent theme of the Holy Rule: we are
      called to more than mere nature. We are called to enhance our nature
      to the heights of sanctity. Our considerate mindfulness for every
      person and their individual needs must be greater than that of the
      world.

      St. Benedict's aim is that each of us ALWAYS see the person first.
      That kind of loving mindfulness will make the chapters on the sick
      and the young and old seem to be complete no-brainers. This is the
      way we should be seeing everyone: real people for whom they really
      are, nothing more or less. Circumstances do arise that require
      greater attention, but the foundation of that is a firm theology of
      personalism.

      It should come as no great shock that the most frequent obstacle to
      viewing others correctly is ourselves. Our own image, our self, our
      pain, our projections get in the way of the lens of truth. We have to
      spend our monastic struggle learning to put those things aside, so
      that the light of others may shine through unobstructed.

      With our own needs at least on a back burner, or better yet, shelved
      far off in the pantry, we can begin to truly see others and their
      needs. Wipe the mud of self from our eyes and we can see the
      treasures that surround us. Mother Teresa of Calcutta surely did
      that. She saw beauty that all of us less holy than she missed big-
      time and she saw it in everyone.

      A key to all this is a favorite quote from Antoine de St.
      Exupery's "Little Prince":

      "The essential is invisible to the eyes. One can only see rightly
      with the heart."

      That's what our Holy Rule demands: the cultivation of the very loving
      eyes of our hearts!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Josh, still worrying his parents as he sorts out some youthful issues. Prayers, too, for Ginnie, brain cancer, an MRI showed some
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 15, 2005
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Josh, still worrying his parents as he sorts out some youthful issues. Prayers, too, for Ginnie, brain cancer, an MRI showed some improvement. Continued prayers for her as chemo progresses. She may have some cognitive disabilities that remain, and prayers for her family, the medical expenses have been crushing. Prayers for Ed, needing hip, knee and ankle replacements, but cardiac problems make them currently impossible, also for Greta, back problems and Marian, diabetes and losing her eyesight. Prayers, too, for Diane, a new grandmother and Dianymarie, her grand daughter born Nov. 11.

        Huge Deo gratias and thanks from Cheryl. Much has already fallen into place for her in housing and employment and, most of all peace with her decision. However, she still has some other matters to pray for, so keep those prayers coming! Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of David, also for Craig, his parents and Carole, that the latter two sell their condos and are able to move into retirement housing. Prayers for Steve, facing some very tough challenges from cancer, and for Freddie, brain cancer and now leg problems are bothering him, further tests pending, and for Linda, his wife. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 16, July 16, November 15
        Chapter 37: On the Old and Children

        Although human nature itself is drawn to special kindness
        towards these times of life,
        that is towards the old and children,
        still the authority of the Rule should also provide for them.


        Let their weakness be always taken into account,
        and let them by no means be held to the rigor of the Rule
        with regard to food.
        On the contrary,
        let a kind consideration be shown to them,
        and let them eat before the regular hours.

        REFLECTION

        Many modern minds would find monasticism itself, including our Holy
        Rule to be a harsh and inflexible thing. Sadly, many cranky,
        curmudgeonly monastics who have missed the mark make those same
        assumptions at times! We are not at all the heartless discipline of a
        sort imagined by many.

        This chapter, on the old and children, as well as in many other
        places, such as the references to those who require more material
        things and the care of the sick are highlights of Benedictinism's
        faceted gem: personalism. St. Benedict sees persons as they are,
        where they are. He meets them at many different points on the road to
        monastic life, even within the monastery itself. He urges us to do
        the same. He also calls all whom he meets at all of those
        points "beginners", lest any of us become proud or think ourselves
        better than the weak lamb he goes after.

        The Holy Rule bends and twists and stoops to make many allowances for
        many different sorts of weakness. In doing so, it clearly shows the
        loving father's heart of the man who wrote its Prologue in such
        tender terms.

        The tenderness of St. Benedict shines through here. These are strong
        words for weakness: "ALWAYS taken into account," and "BY NO MEANS
        held to the rigor of the Rule for food." Though he prefaces his
        chapter recalling that any healthy human nature has a certain level
        of consideration for these age groups, our holy Father Benedict
        quickly returns to a very consistent theme of the Holy Rule: we are
        called to more than mere nature. We are called to enhance our nature
        to the heights of sanctity. Our considerate mindfulness for every
        person and their individual needs must be greater than that of the
        world.

        St. Benedict's aim is that each of us ALWAYS see the person first.
        That kind of loving mindfulness will make the chapters on the sick
        and the young and old seem to be complete no-brainers. This is the
        way we should be seeing everyone: real people for whom they really
        are, nothing more or less. Circumstances do arise that require
        greater attention, but the foundation of that is a firm theology of
        personalism.

        It should come as no great shock that the most frequent obstacle to
        viewing others correctly is ourselves. Our own image, our self, our
        pain, our projections get in the way of the lens of truth. We have to
        spend our monastic struggle learning to put those things aside, so
        that the light of others may shine through unobstructed.

        With our own needs at least on a back burner, or better yet, shelved
        far off in the pantry, we can begin to truly see others and their
        needs. Wipe the mud of self from our eyes and we can see the
        treasures that surround us. Mother Teresa of Calcutta surely did
        that. She saw beauty that all of us less holy than she missed big-
        time and she saw it in everyone.

        A key to all this is a favorite quote from Antoine de St.
        Exupery's "Little Prince":

        "The essential is invisible to the eyes. One can only see rightly
        with the heart."

        That's what our Holy Rule demands: the cultivation of the very loving
        eyes of our hearts!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers, please, for a Church experiencing a tremendous lot of staff turnover, very difficult so near the holidays, and for their pastor. Prayers for the
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 14, 2007
          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for a Church experiencing a tremendous lot of staff turnover, very difficult so near the holidays, and for their pastor.

          Prayers for the spiritual, physical and mental health of the following, for all their families and loved ones and for all who treat or care for them:

          Susan, heart surgery pending soon, for her worried Mom, too.

          Bev, painful root canal and dental work.

          Sharbel, ulcerative colitis and in need of a doctor who can adequately treat him, and for strength for his wife and family.

          Tom, thymic carcinoma, a rare cancer, tumor must be shrunk with chemo before surgery.

          Jane's Dad, his tumor has returned and is growing.

          Clara, 99 coherent but bedridden, she had to be told today that her last child had died. She had been asking why he wasn't visiting anymore. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God s never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 16, July 16, November 15
          Chapter 37: On the Old and Children

          Although human nature itself is drawn to special kindness
          towards these times of life,
          that is towards the old and children,
          still the authority of the Rule should also provide for them.

          Let their weakness be always taken into account,
          and let them by no means be held to the rigor of the Rule
          with regard to food.
          On the contrary,
          let a kind consideration be shown to them,
          and let them eat before the regular hours.

          REFLECTION

          Many modern minds would find monasticism itself, including our Holy
          Rule to be a harsh and inflexible thing. Sadly, many cranky,
          curmudgeonly monastics who have missed the mark make those same
          assumptions at times! We are not at all the heartless discipline of a
          sort imagined by many.

          This chapter, on the old and children, as well as in many other
          places, such as the references to those who require more material
          things and the care of the sick are highlights of Benedictinism's
          faceted gem: personalism. St. Benedict sees persons as they are,
          where they are. He meets them at many different points on the road to
          monastic life, even within the monastery itself. He urges us to do
          the same. He also calls all whom he meets at all of those
          points "beginners", lest any of us become proud or think ourselves
          better than the weak lamb he goes after.

          The Holy Rule bends and twists and stoops to make many allowances for
          many different sorts of weakness. In doing so, it clearly shows the
          loving father's heart of the man who wrote its Prologue in such
          tender terms.

          The tenderness of St. Benedict shines through here. These are strong
          words for weakness: "ALWAYS taken into account," and "BY NO MEANS
          held to the rigor of the Rule for food." Though he prefaces his
          chapter recalling that any healthy human nature has a certain level
          of consideration for these age groups, our holy Father Benedict
          quickly returns to a very consistent theme of the Holy Rule: we are
          called to more than mere nature. We are called to enhance our nature
          to the heights of sanctity. Our considerate mindfulness for every
          person and their individual needs must be greater than that of the
          world.

          St. Benedict's aim is that each of us ALWAYS see the person first.
          That kind of loving mindfulness will make the chapters on the sick
          and the young and old seem to be complete no-brainers. This is the
          way we should be seeing everyone: real people for whom they really
          are, nothing more or less. Circumstances do arise that require
          greater attention, but the foundation of that is a firm theology of
          personalism.

          It should come as no great shock that the most frequent obstacle to
          viewing others correctly is ourselves. Our own image, our self, our
          pain, our projections get in the way of the lens of truth. We have to
          spend our monastic struggle learning to put those things aside, so
          that the light of others may shine through unobstructed.

          With our own needs at least on a back burner, or better yet, shelved
          far off in the pantry, we can begin to truly see others and their
          needs. Wipe the mud of self from our eyes and we can see the
          treasures that surround us. Mother Teresa of Calcutta surely did
          that. She saw beauty that all of us less holy than she missed big-
          time and she saw it in everyone.

          A key to all this is a favorite quote from Antoine de St.
          Exupery's "Little Prince":

          "The essential is invisible to the eyes. One can only see rightly
          with the heart."

          That's what our Holy Rule demands: the cultivation of the very loving
          eyes of our hearts!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of John Porta, 59, who lost his battle with cancer. Prayers, too, for his wife and children and for his parents, St. Leo
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 14, 2016

            +PAX

             

            Prayers for the eternal rest of John Porta, 59, who lost his battle with cancer. Prayers, too, for his wife and children and for his parents, St. Leo Oblate Ann Marie and Robert, and for all his family and all who mourn him.

             

            Prayers for the eternal rest of Br. Damian Rogers, OSB, of St. John’s Abbey, Collegeville, and for all his family, Community and all who mourn him.

             

            Prayers for all those threatened by forest fires over several states in Appalachia, in the southern USA. May all be safe and may homes be spared. May all those coming from many places to fight the fires be safe.

             

            Prayers for the eternal rest of Charles, and for all his family and all who mourn him, esp. Jay.

             

            Prayers for Joshua, many health issues and a severe spiritual crisis.

             

            Prayers for Stephen, going on a silent retreat.

            Prayers for Ryan, special intention.

             

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. BJL

            March 16, July 16, November 15
            Chapter 37: On the Old and Children

            Although human nature itself is drawn to special kindness
            towards these times of life,
            that is towards the old and children,
            still the authority of the Rule should also provide for them.

            Let their weakness be always taken into account,
            and let them by no means be held to the rigor of the Rule
            with regard to food.
            On the contrary,
            let a kind consideration be shown to them,
            and let them eat before the regular hours.

            REFLECTION


            In this chapter, on the old and children, as well as in many other
            places, such as the references to those who require more material
            things and the care of the sick are highlights of Benedictinism's
            faceted gem: personalism. St. Benedict sees persons as they are,
            where they are. He meets them at many different points on the road to
            monastic life, even within the monastery itself. He urges us to do
            the same. He also calls all whom he meets at all of those
            points "beginners", lest any of us become proud or think ourselves
            better than the weak lamb he goes after.

            The Holy Rule bends and twists and stoops to make many allowances for
            many different sorts of weakness. In doing so, it clearly shows the
            loving father's heart of the man who wrote its Prologue in such
            tender terms.

            The tenderness of St. Benedict shines through here. These are strong
            words for weakness: "ALWAYS taken into account," and "BY NO MEANS
            held to the rigor of the Rule for food." Though he prefaces his
            chapter recalling that any healthy human nature has a certain level
            of consideration for these age groups, our holy Father Benedict
            quickly returns to a very consistent theme of the Holy Rule: we are
            called to more than mere nature. We are called to enhance our nature
            to the heights of sanctity. Our considerate mindfulness for every
            person and their individual needs must be greater than that of the
            world.

            St. Benedict's aim is that each of us ALWAYS see the person first.
            That kind of loving mindfulness will make the chapters on the sick
            and the young and old seem to be complete no-brainers. This is the
            way we should be seeing everyone: real people for whom they really
            are, nothing more or less. Circumstances do arise that require
            greater attention, but the foundation of that is a firm theology of
            personalism.

            It should come as no great shock that the most frequent obstacle to
            viewing others correctly is ourselves. Our own image, our self, our
            pain, our projections get in the way of the lens of truth. We have to
            spend our monastic struggle learning to put those things aside, so
            that the light of others may shine through unobstructed.

            With our own needs at least on a back burner, or better yet, shelved
            far off in the pantry, we can begin to truly see others and their
            needs. Wipe the mud of self from our eyes and we can see the
            treasures that surround us. Blessed Teresa of Calcutta surely did
            that. She saw beauty that all of us less holy than she missed big-
            time and she saw it in everyone.

            A key to all this is a favorite quote from Antoine de St.
            Exupery's "Little Prince":

            "The essential is invisible to the eyes. One can only see rightly
            with the heart."

            That's what our Holy Rule demands: the cultivation of the very loving
            eyes of our hearts!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA

             

             

             

             

             

             

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