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Holy Rule for Nov. 10

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers St. Leo Abbey on their patronal feast, for Hegumen (Abbot) Leo of Holy Trinity Monastery, and for me, on my second feastday. Contrary to
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 10, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers St. Leo Abbey on their patronal feast, for Hegumen (Abbot) Leo of Holy Trinity Monastery, and for me, on my second feastday. Contrary to unfortunately popular belief, I am of the opinion that one who takes two religious names CAN have two... LOL!

      Prayers, too, for CJ, 8, his parents and family. He was killed by a car. The family lost his older brother to a car accident two years ago and another sibling to sudden infant death syndrome. Big need for prayers here, as well as for the young woman who was driving the car. Prayers, too, for the ministries and jobs of Deacon Jay and his wife, Gloria. They have moved to a new area and are starting anew. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. J. LEO

      March 11, July 11, November 10
      Chapter 33: Whether Monks Ought to Have Anything of Their Own

      This vice especially
      is to be cut out of the monastery by the roots.
      Let no one presume to give or receive anything
      without the Abbot's leave,
      or to have anything as his own --
      anything whatever,
      whether book or tablets or pen or whatever it may be --
      since they are not permitted to have even their bodies or wills
      at their own disposal;
      but for all their necessities
      let them look to the Father of the monastery.
      And let it be unlawful to have anything
      which the Abbot has not given or allowed.
      Let all things be common to all,
      as it is written (Acts 4:32),
      and let no one say or assume that anything is his own.

      But if anyone is caught indulging in this most wicked vice,
      let him be admonished once and a second time.
      If he fails to amend,
      let him undergo punishment.


      REFLECTION

      Benedictine poverty is easily translatable for the lay monastic,
      married or single, into terms of simplicity and detachment, a holy
      indifference to non-essentials. As such, it offers a powerful
      opportunity for a witness against some of the real falsehoods of
      modern consumerist society. This is not (nor need it be,) a preachy
      attack on today's values, just a quiet refusal to go along with them.
      It involves personal practice and choice, not confrontation.

      Benedictine teaching on material goods is based on needs, not
      desires. We ought to have all that is necessary and if, as sometimes
      happens, that is not possible, we ought not to grumble.
      Benedictine simplicity insists that we live in the moment of now with
      gratitude.

      Does your family have all that you really need today? If so, then
      don't put your heart on hold till you can swing a below-ground
      swimming pool. That's exactly why inordinate desires can be so
      harmful: they DO put our hearts on hold, they take us out of the
      contented present and force us to live in an uncertain future
      of "when" and "if".

      That future is not real. We might never live to see it. We have no
      way of knowing whether or not we will live till lunch today. [And,
      depending on which of the brethren is cooking today, many might
      wish they would not... LOL!] The present is all we have and anything
      that distracts our view from it is often a complete waste of time.
      Living in the now is a great reality check!

      I always hate discussions of simplicity that are so general that they
      leave people thinking: "Well, great, but how do I DO that?" Hence a
      few suggestions, not at all as norms, but just as ideas. With them
      comes a huge warning for Oblates who are spouses and parents. You can
      make choices like this for yourself, in some cases, even for the
      household, but you must never force such things on children or
      spouses. That can be disastrous and produces the very same loss of
      serenity that simplicity is designed to protect us from.

      Clothes. Almost everyone can make do with less, male or female.
      Before I became a monk, I generally had two pairs of slacks- one
      khaki and one navy blue. They looked preppy. They went with
      everything. Yes, after a while, people did notice I was always in one
      or the other, but so what? The shirts were different and I was clean.
      The shirts came from the Salvation Army: years of wear in good
      clothes for less than $5 a pop, less than $2 a pop if one waited till
      sale day.

      Recycle in your own home. Towels go down from the bath, to the
      kitchen, to rags. With all the rags you will soon accumulate living
      this way, you can say goodbye to paper towels, unless there is some
      reason you really need them. Cloth napkins? Wow! They even seem a bit
      upscale and you can stop buying one-use paper. Trust me, ordinarily
      washing them once a week is fine.

      This is not stinge, folks. Insofar as possible, consume stuff that is
      really good for you, avoid stuff that is wasteful or harmful. We
      become immune to the very high levels that our society actually
      encourages waste, almost demands it.

      How many people over fifty recall their first reactions to disposable
      lighters, ballpoint pens and razors when they first came out? It was
      like: "Huh??? You throw them away???" When was the last time you
      bought a refill for a ballpoint pen? Now one hardly sees any pens BUT
      disposable ones. Big, big money and profits were made by the
      companies teaching us to throw away and waste the WHOLE item, not
      just the used part. We got used to that, sadly.

      I went back to non-disposable razors some time ago, but they cost a
      good deal more than the throw away kind, which have filled who knows
      how many garage dumps in 30 years. Somebody gave me a Zippo lighter
      for Christmas two years ago. It is a bit of a hassle to keep it in
      flints and fluid, but it means that I have spared the planet from at
      least a little plastic.

      By the way, you don't do this because it will end over-consumption.
      It won't. The world has not moved to Schick razors and Zippos, nor
      are they likely to do so any time soon. What it does, and this is
      important, is limit your complicity in the nonsense. That, so long as
      one does not become self-righteous, can be an immensely freeing thing.

      Always remember the Zen principle: the only thing that is lacking is
      the sense that nothing is lacking. Modern consumerism thrives on and
      insists that we ALWAYS feel something is lacking. Not so, we can be
      free of that. Why be lied to any more?

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers for Saint Leo Abbey, their monks and Oblates and for Saint Leo University on their patronal feast. Special prayers for Abbot (Hegumen) Leo of Holy
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 10, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers for Saint Leo Abbey, their monks and Oblates and for Saint Leo University on their patronal feast. Special prayers for Abbot (Hegumen) Leo of Holy Trinity Byzantine rite Benedictine Monastery. Even a prayer or two for me, whose second religious name is Leo in honor of all of them at the Abbey!

        Prayers for Fr. Fabian of Prinknash Abbey, who has died, for his happy death and eternal rest. Prayers for the happy death of Glen, and for his wife of many, many years, Bernardine. Both are quite elderly and Glen is nearing death. Prayers, too, for all their family and friends. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 11, July 11, November 10
        Chapter 33: Whether Monks Ought to Have Anything of Their Own

        This vice especially
        is to be cut out of the monastery by the roots.
        Let no one presume to give or receive anything
        without the Abbot's leave,
        or to have anything as his own --
        anything whatever,
        whether book or tablets or pen or whatever it may be --
        since they are not permitted to have even their bodies or wills
        at their own disposal;
        but for all their necessities
        let them look to the Father of the monastery.
        And let it be unlawful to have anything
        which the Abbot has not given or allowed.
        Let all things be common to all,
        as it is written (Acts 4:32),
        and let no one say or assume that anything is his own.

        But if anyone is caught indulging in this most wicked vice,
        let him be admonished once and a second time.
        If he fails to amend,
        let him undergo punishment.


        REFLECTION

        Benedictine poverty is easily translatable for the lay monastic,
        married or single, into terms of simplicity and detachment, a holy
        indifference to non-essentials. As such, it offers a powerful
        opportunity for a witness against some of the real falsehoods of
        modern consumerist society. This is not (nor need it be,) a preachy
        attack on today's values, just a quiet refusal to go along with them.
        It involves personal practice and choice, not confrontation.

        Benedictine teaching on material goods is based on needs, not
        desires. We ought to have all that is necessary and if, as sometimes
        happens, that is not possible, we ought not to grumble.
        Benedictine simplicity insists that we live in the moment of now with
        gratitude.

        Does your family have all that you really need today? If so, then
        don't put your heart on hold till you can swing a below-ground
        swimming pool. That's exactly why inordinate desires can be so
        harmful: they DO put our hearts on hold, they take us out of the
        contented present and force us to live in an uncertain future
        of "when" and "if".

        That future is not real. We might never live to see it. We have no
        way of knowing whether or not we will live till lunch today. [And,
        depending on which of the brethren is cooking today, many might
        wish they would not... LOL!] The present is all we have and anything
        that distracts our view from it is often a complete waste of time.
        Living in the now is a great reality check!

        I always hate discussions of simplicity that are so general that they
        leave people thinking: "Well, great, but how do I DO that?" Hence a
        few suggestions, not at all as norms, but just as ideas. With them
        comes a huge warning for Oblates who are spouses and parents. You can
        make choices like this for yourself, in some cases, even for the
        household, but you must never force such things on children or
        spouses. That can be disastrous and produces the very same loss of
        serenity that simplicity is designed to protect us from.

        Clothes. Almost everyone can make do with less, male or female.
        Before I became a monk, I generally had two pairs of slacks- one
        khaki and one navy blue. They looked preppy. They went with
        everything. Yes, after a while, people did notice I was always in one
        or the other, but so what? The shirts were different and I was clean.
        The shirts came from the Salvation Army: years of wear in good
        clothes for less than $5 a pop, less than $2 a pop if one waited till
        sale day.

        Recycle in your own home. Towels go down from the bath, to the
        kitchen, to rags. With all the rags you will soon accumulate living
        this way, you can say goodbye to paper towels, unless there is some
        reason you really need them. Cloth napkins? Wow! They even seem a bit
        upscale and you can stop buying one-use paper. Trust me, ordinarily
        washing them once a week is fine.

        This is not stinge, folks. Insofar as possible, consume stuff that is
        really good for you, avoid stuff that is wasteful or harmful. We
        become immune to the very high levels that our society actually
        encourages waste, almost demands it.

        How many people over fifty recall their first reactions to disposable
        lighters, ballpoint pens and razors when they first came out? It was
        like: "Huh??? You throw them away???" When was the last time you
        bought a refill for a ballpoint pen? Now one hardly sees any pens BUT
        disposable ones. Big, big money and profits were made by the
        companies teaching us to throw away and waste the WHOLE item, not
        just the used part. We got used to that, sadly.

        I went back to non-disposable razors some time ago, but they cost a
        good deal more than the throw away kind, which have filled who knows
        how many garage dumps in 30 years. Somebody gave me a Zippo lighter
        for Christmas two years ago. It is a bit of a hassle to keep it in
        flints and fluid, but it means that I have spared the planet from at
        least a little plastic.

        By the way, you don't do this because it will end over-consumption.
        It won't. The world has not moved to Schick razors and Zippos, nor
        are they likely to do so any time soon. What it does, and this is
        important, is limit your complicity in the nonsense. That, so long as
        one does not become self-righteous, can be an immensely freeing thing.

        Always remember the Zen principle: the only thing that is lacking is
        the sense that nothing is lacking. Modern consumerism thrives on and
        insists that we ALWAYS feel something is lacking. Not so, we can be
        free of that. Why be lied to any more?

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX RE: Emma s van: Jenn is the wonderful woman who died, prayers for her happy death and eternal rest, and for all who mourn her. Special prayers for her
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 9, 2006
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          +PAX

          RE: Emma's van: Jenn is the wonderful woman who died, prayers for her happy
          death and eternal rest, and for all who mourn her. Special prayers for her
          daughter Melissa, who gave the van to Emma's folks. Didn't have their names
          until today.

          Prayers for St. Leo Abbey and University on their patronal feast: God's
          choicest blessings on their Monks and Oblates.

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Lloyd and for all who mourn
          him. Prayers for a very troubled marriage in South Carolina. Prayers for
          Marcella, early 40's, was taken by ambulance to a local hospital last night after
          collapsing at home. Prayers, too, for her husband, Jeff, and daughter Sarah,
          15. Deo gratias, the young Mom who bled so badly after her first child was
          born that she had to have a hysterectomy is doing well. Though she had a
          stroke, she is up and pushing her baby in a stroller. For so long she hung near
          death, prayers are powerful!

          HUGE DEO GRATIAS: Quite some time ago, we prayed for Fr. Tim Vakoc, severely
          injured in Iraq by a roadside bomb, just after celebrating Mass. For two
          years since, he has been in a nearly comatose state. Now he has begun to speak
          again, after all that time. His family credit prayers for this virtual
          miracle. Continued prayers for him and those who treat him and all our prayer folks.

          Prayers for the nuns of Jamberoo Abbey in Australia, preparing to elect a
          new Abbess. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
          mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 11, July 11, November 10
          Chapter 33: Whether Monks Ought to Have Anything of Their Own

          This vice especially
          is to be cut out of the monastery by the roots.
          Let no one presume to give or receive anything
          without the Abbot's leave,
          or to have anything as his own --
          anything whatever,
          whether book or tablets or pen or whatever it may be --
          since they are not permitted to have even their bodies or wills
          at their own disposal;
          but for all their necessities
          let them look to the Father of the monastery.
          And let it be unlawful to have anything
          which the Abbot has not given or allowed.
          Let all things be common to all,
          as it is written (Acts 4:32),
          and let no one say or assume that anything is his own.

          But if anyone is caught indulging in this most wicked vice,
          let him be admonished once and a second time.
          If he fails to amend,
          let him undergo punishment.


          REFLECTION

          Benedictine poverty is easily translatable for the lay monastic,
          married or single, into terms of simplicity and detachment, a holy
          indifference to non-essentials. As such, it offers a powerful
          opportunity for a witness against some of the real falsehoods of
          modern consumerist society. This is not (nor need it be,) a preachy
          attack on today's values, just a quiet refusal to go along with them.
          It involves personal practice and choice, not confrontation.

          Benedictine teaching on material goods is based on needs, not
          desires. We ought to have all that is necessary and if, as sometimes
          happens, that is not possible, we ought not to grumble.
          Benedictine simplicity insists that we live in the moment of now with
          gratitude.

          Does your family have all that you really need today? If so, then
          don't put your heart on hold till you can swing a below-ground
          swimming pool. That's exactly why inordinate desires can be so
          harmful: they DO put our hearts on hold, they take us out of the
          contented present and force us to live in an uncertain future
          of "when" and "if".

          That future is not real. We might never live to see it. We have no
          way of knowing whether or not we will live till lunch today. [And,
          depending on which of the brethren is cooking today, many might
          wish they would not... LOL!] The present is all we have and anything
          that distracts our view from it is often a complete waste of time.
          Living in the now is a great reality check!

          I always hate discussions of simplicity that are so general that they
          leave people thinking: "Well, great, but how do I DO that?" Hence a
          few suggestions, not at all as norms, but just as ideas. With them
          comes a huge warning for Oblates who are spouses and parents. You can
          make choices like this for yourself, in some cases, even for the
          household, but you must never force such things on children or
          spouses. That can be disastrous and produces the very same loss of
          serenity that simplicity is designed to protect us from.

          Clothes. Almost everyone can make do with less, male or female.
          Before I became a monk, I generally had two pairs of slacks- one
          khaki and one navy blue. They looked preppy. They went with
          everything. Yes, after a while, people did notice I was always in one
          or the other, but so what? The shirts were different and I was clean.
          The shirts came from the Salvation Army: years of wear in good
          clothes for less than $5 a pop, less than $2 a pop if one waited till
          sale day.

          Recycle in your own home. Towels go down from the bath, to the
          kitchen, to rags. With all the rags you will soon accumulate living
          this way, you can say goodbye to paper towels, unless there is some
          reason you really need them. Cloth napkins? Wow! They even seem a bit
          upscale and you can stop buying one-use paper. Trust me, ordinarily
          washing them once a week is fine.

          This is not stinge, folks. Insofar as possible, consume stuff that is
          really good for you, avoid stuff that is wasteful or harmful. We
          become immune to the very high levels that our society actually
          encourages waste, almost demands it.

          How many people over fifty recall their first reactions to disposable
          lighters, ballpoint pens and razors when they first came out? It was
          like: "Huh??? You throw them away???" When was the last time you
          bought a refill for a ballpoint pen? Now one hardly sees any pens BUT
          disposable ones. Big, big money and profits were made by the
          companies teaching us to throw away and waste the WHOLE item, not
          just the used part. We got used to that, sadly.

          I went back to non-disposable razors some time ago, but they cost a
          good deal more than the throw away kind, which have filled who knows
          how many garage dumps in 30 years. Somebody gave me a Zippo lighter
          for Christmas two years ago. It is a bit of a hassle to keep it in
          flints and fluid, but it means that I have spared the planet from at
          least a little plastic.

          By the way, you don't do this because it will end over-consumption.
          It won't. The world has not moved to Schick razors and Zippos, nor
          are they likely to do so any time soon. What it does, and this is
          important, is limit your complicity in the nonsense. That, so long as
          one does not become self-righteous, can be an immensely freeing thing.

          Always remember the Zen principle: the only thing that is lacking is
          the sense that nothing is lacking. Modern consumerism thrives on and
          insists that we ALWAYS feel something is lacking. Not so, we can be
          free of that. Why be lied to any more?

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          Petersham, MA



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX A blessed feast of St. Leo to all, and special prayers for all of St. Leo Abbey and University on their patronal feast. Prayers for the spiritual, mental
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 9, 2007
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            +PAX

            A blessed feast of St. Leo to all, and special prayers for all of St. Leo Abbey and University on their patronal feast.

            Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physica health of the following, for all their families and all who treat them:

            Baby Liam and his Dad, nasty fall.

            Dianne, completed her chemo.

            Larry, seeking work.

            Leslie, who lost her Mom and uncle earlier this year and for their eternal rest and happy death.

            Carmen who has mental problems and is recovering from a sever case of pneumonia.
            Andrew, a 17 year old who was killed in car accident.

            Bernice who is under going radiation therapy for throat cancer.

            For all the elderly who have no one to visit them in hospital and nursing homes.

            the former Archbishop of Birmingham, in England, Most Rev. Maurice Couve de Murville, has died after his own battle with cancer.

            Brigid, breast cancer spread to bones and brain and for her devoted husband, Brendan and nephew, Kevan.

            For Fr. Vincent, a Vietnam chaplain killed in action, and for Fr. Vakic, wounded in action and now retired and for all military personnel. Lord, help us all as You know and will. od's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much. JL

            March 11, July 11, November 10
            Chapter 33: Whether Monks Ought to Have Anything of Their Own

            This vice especially
            is to be cut out of the monastery by the roots.
            Let no one presume to give or receive anything
            without the Abbot's leave,
            or to have anything as his own --
            anything whatever,
            whether book or tablets or pen or whatever it may be --
            since they are not permitted to have even their bodies or wills
            at their own disposal;
            but for all their necessities
            let them look to the Father of the monastery.
            And let it be unlawful to have anything
            which the Abbot has not given or allowed.
            Let all things be common to all,
            as it is written (Acts 4:32),
            and let no one say or assume that anything is his own.

            But if anyone is caught indulging in this most wicked vice,
            let him be admonished once and a second time.
            If he fails to amend,
            let him undergo punishment.


            REFLECTION

            Benedictine poverty is easily translatable for the lay monastic,
            married or single, into terms of simplicity and detachment, a holy
            indifference to non-essentials. As such, it offers a powerful
            opportunity for a witness against some of the real falsehoods of
            modern consumerist society. This is not (nor need it be,) a preachy
            attack on today's values, just a quiet refusal to go along with them.
            It involves personal practice and choice, not confrontation.

            Benedictine teaching on material goods is based on needs, not
            desires. We ought to have all that is necessary and if, as sometimes
            happens, that is not possible, we ought not to grumble.
            Benedictine simplicity insists that we live in the moment of now with
            gratitude.

            Does your family have all that you really need today? If so, then
            don't put your heart on hold till you can swing a below-ground
            swimming pool. That's exactly why inordinate desires can be so
            harmful: they DO put our hearts on hold, they take us out of the
            contented present and force us to live in an uncertain future
            of "when" and "if".

            That future is not real. We might never live to see it. We have no
            way of knowing whether or not we will live till lunch today. [And,
            depending on which of the brethren is cooking today, many might
            wish they would not... LOL!] The present is all we have and anything
            that distracts our view from it is often a complete waste of time.
            Living in the now is a great reality check!

            I always hate discussions of simplicity that are so general that they
            leave people thinking: "Well, great, but how do I DO that?" Hence a
            few suggestions, not at all as norms, but just as ideas. With them
            comes a huge warning for Oblates who are spouses and parents. You can
            make choices like this for yourself, in some cases, even for the
            household, but you must never force such things on children or
            spouses. That can be disastrous and produces the very same loss of
            serenity that simplicity is designed to protect us from.

            Clothes. Almost everyone can make do with less, male or female.
            Before I became a monk, I generally had two pairs of slacks- one
            khaki and one navy blue. They looked preppy. They went with
            everything. Yes, after a while, people did notice I was always in one
            or the other, but so what? The shirts were different and I was clean.
            The shirts came from the Salvation Army: years of wear in good
            clothes for less than $5 a pop, less than $2 a pop if one waited till
            sale day.

            Recycle in your own home. Towels go down from the bath, to the
            kitchen, to rags. With all the rags you will soon accumulate living
            this way, you can say goodbye to paper towels, unless there is some
            reason you really need them. Cloth napkins? Wow! They even seem a bit
            upscale and you can stop buying one-use paper. Trust me, ordinarily
            washing them once a week is fine.

            This is not stinge, folks. Insofar as possible, consume stuff that is
            really good for you, avoid stuff that is wasteful or harmful. We
            become immune to the very high levels that our society actually
            encourages waste, almost demands it.

            How many people over fifty recall their first reactions to disposable
            lighters, ballpoint pens and razors when they first came out? It was
            like: "Huh??? You throw them away???" When was the last time you
            bought a refill for a ballpoint pen? Now one hardly sees any pens BUT
            disposable ones. Big, big money and profits were made by the
            companies teaching us to throw away and waste the WHOLE item, not
            just the used part. We got used to that, sadly.

            I went back to non-disposable razors some time ago, but they cost a
            good deal more than the throw away kind, which have filled who knows
            how many garage dumps in 30 years. Somebody gave me a Zippo lighter
            for Christmas two years ago. It is a bit of a hassle to keep it in
            flints and fluid, but it means that I have spared the planet from at
            least a little plastic.

            By the way, you don't do this because it will end over-consumption.
            It won't. The world has not moved to Schick razors and Zippos, nor
            are they likely to do so any time soon. What it does, and this is
            important, is limit your complicity in the nonsense. That, so long as
            one does not become self-righteous, can be an immensely freeing thing.

            Always remember the Zen principle: the only thing that is lacking is
            the sense that nothing is lacking. Modern consumerism thrives on and
            insists that we ALWAYS feel something is lacking. Not so, we can be
            free of that. Why be lied to any more?

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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