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Holy Rule for Sept. 23

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Deo gratias! Barbara, for whom we prayed, has won custody of her son, Sam and Zack. Prayers for Julian, who needs a job with benefits, his old company
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 23, 2004
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      +PAX

      Deo gratias! Barbara, for whom we prayed, has won custody of her son, Sam and Zack. Prayers for Julian, who needs a job with benefits, his old company went under. His wife has lupus, diabetes and kidney trouble and they have 2 small children. Prayers for Dianne, having a colostomy and very upset about her stage one colon cancer and the colostomy, understandably. For Barb, mother in nursing home with Alzheimer's, son, daughter and sister are mentally ill and she is caring for them all. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much. JL

      January 23, May 24, September 23
      Chapter 5: On Obedience

      But this very obedience
      will be acceptable to God and pleasing to all
      only if what is commanded is done
      without hesitation, delay, lukewarmness, grumbling, or objection.
      For the obedience given to Superiors is given to God,
      since He Himself has said,
      "He who hears you, hears Me" (Luke 10:16).
      And the disciples should offer their obedience with a good will,
      for "God loves a cheerful giver" (2 Cor. 9:7).
      For if the disciple obeys with an ill will
      and murmurs,
      not necessarily with his lips but simply in his heart,
      then even though he fulfill the command
      yet his work will not be acceptable to God,
      who sees that his heart is murmuring.
      And, far from gaining a reward for such work as this,
      he will incur the punishment due to murmurers,
      unless he amend and make satisfaction.

      REFLECTION

      Trust me, folks, I am not second-guessing St. Benedict on this one, I
      just think there is a chance that he is often misread and that
      something not at all contrary to his precepts needs to be emphasized.

      Few who share my cynical bent would fail to chafe at a reading of
      this passage which implies that we must all be cheerful, Pollyanna
      optimists, blithely smiling automatons. Yes, we are told not to
      murmur, and to put the very best face on our obedience that we
      possibly can. Often the real miracle of grace is that we can just
      barely obey in silence, without any comment at all. No doubt that is
      a tender mercy to those who live with us! We must not read St.
      Benedict harshly, even less so God. We must keep the loving parent
      image ever before our eyes in both instances.

      I want to expand the image of the non-murmuring heart a bit.Some days
      one's heart cannot murmur, because it is numb and paralyzed, unable
      to do much of anything more explicit than ache. Some days one's heart
      is Ground Zero, and everything coming at it seems to be just one more
      horrible plane. Never, never think that St. Benedict is telling us to
      put a happy face on this. A brave face or even a blank expressionless
      one may be all one can muster.

      However, and here's the rub, even when that brave or expressionless
      face is all we can do, we can STILL obey cheerfully. How? Well, for
      one thing, that cheer is in the will, not the emotions. It is the
      readiness of gift. Beyond that, even when sore beset, we can strive
      NOT to complain or whine. Face it, no one but God will really
      understand our most broken points anyhow. The sooner we learn that,
      the more time we save on trying to find humans who will.

      How very great is the love of God for us at such times. A favorite
      image I have used before is very apt here: the heart of God is like a
      Mother's refrigerator door, plastered with children's bad, even
      ghastly art. (OK, I KNOW it may be age-appropriate art, but bear with
      me on this one....)

      God is bursting and beaming with pride at our struggling efforts. He
      cares not a wit that we are not beaming with feigned cheer ourselves.
      With all that mud on our faces, who could see the forced smile
      anyhow? There will never be a time, in this world or in the next,
      when God loves us more than He does when we are fallen, crawling on
      all fours and still barely hanging on. The effort, always the effort
      is what God sees.

      Of course, having written all this in plodder-appropriate language
      for strays like myself, I have to add that the ideal of genuine joy
      and, yes, even cheer, is what we entry-level folks are aiming at. It
      was said of Blessed Titus Brandsma, a Carmelite university professor
      killed by the Nazis for opposing their regime in Holland, that he
      seemed as happy in prison as if he had been in his monastery.

      One witness said it seemed to make no difference to him. His mind was
      always on others. They could only tell he had been beaten by the
      blood on his jacket and when someone commented on the fact, he would
      downplay it and change the subject. He was always cheerful and
      gracious. After two prisons, the Germans sent him to Dachau, where
      his weakened condition made him fodder for their "medical"
      experiments. He lasted less than a month there, killed by a lethal
      injection in July, 1942.

      Blessed Titus was a gentle, cultured man, an intellectual giant whose
      academic world had no shadow of the horrors that were his end.
      Fortunately, for him and for us, Blessed Titus truly understood what
      he had studied and it made him a great saint.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for a Confirmation class on retreat here tonight and tomorrow. Prayers, too, for Rose, she had a stroke after both stomach cancer and
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 23, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for a Confirmation class on retreat here tonight and tomorrow. Prayers, too, for Rose, she had a stroke after both stomach cancer and spinal cancer which are still under treatment. All this after a messy divorce from an abusive spouse. Her medical care is furthered hampered because she is in the hurricane region. Saddest of all, she blames her problems on God and is so angry. Prayers for her healing in soul, faith and body. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        January 23, May 24, September 23
        Chapter 5: On Obedience

        But this very obedience
        will be acceptable to God and pleasing to all
        only if what is commanded is done
        without hesitation, delay, lukewarmness, grumbling, or objection.
        For the obedience given to Superiors is given to God,
        since He Himself has said,
        "He who hears you, hears Me" (Luke 10:16).
        And the disciples should offer their obedience with a good will,
        for "God loves a cheerful giver" (2 Cor. 9:7).
        For if the disciple obeys with an ill will
        and murmurs,
        not necessarily with his lips but simply in his heart,
        then even though he fulfill the command
        yet his work will not be acceptable to God,
        who sees that his heart is murmuring.
        And, far from gaining a reward for such work as this,
        he will incur the punishment due to murmurers,
        unless he amend and make satisfaction.

        REFLECTION

        Trust me, folks, I am not second-guessing St. Benedict on this one, I
        just think there is a chance that he is often misread and that
        something not at all contrary to his precepts needs to be emphasized.

        Few who share my cynical bent would fail to chafe at a reading of
        this passage which implies that we must all be cheerful, Pollyanna
        optimists, blithely smiling automatons. Yes, we are told not to
        murmur, and to put the very best face on our obedience that we
        possibly can. Often the real miracle of grace is that we can just
        barely obey in silence, without any comment at all. No doubt that is
        a tender mercy to those who live with us! We must not read St.
        Benedict harshly, even less so God. We must keep the loving parent
        image ever before our eyes in both instances.

        I want to expand the image of the non-murmuring heart a bit.Some days
        one's heart cannot murmur, because it is numb and paralyzed, unable
        to do much of anything more explicit than ache. Some days one's heart
        is Ground Zero, and everything coming at it seems to be just one more
        horrible plane. Never, never think that St. Benedict is telling us to
        put a happy face on this. A brave face or even a blank expressionless
        one may be all one can muster.

        However, and here's the rub, even when that brave or expressionless
        face is all we can do, we can STILL obey cheerfully. How? Well, for
        one thing, that cheer is in the will, not the emotions. It is the
        readiness of gift. Beyond that, even when sore beset, we can strive
        NOT to complain or whine. Face it, no one but God will really
        understand our most broken points anyhow. The sooner we learn that,
        the less time we waste on trying to find humans who will.

        How very great is the love of God for us at such times. A favorite
        image I have used before is very apt here: the heart of God is like a
        Mother's refrigerator door, plastered with children's bad, even
        ghastly art. (OK, I KNOW it may be age-appropriate art, but bear with
        me on this one....)

        God is bursting and beaming with pride at our struggling efforts. He
        cares not a wit that we are not beaming with feigned cheer ourselves.
        With all that mud on our faces, who could see the forced smile
        anyhow? There will never be a time, in this world or in the next,
        when God loves us more than He does when we are fallen, crawling on
        all fours and still barely hanging on. The effort, always the effort
        is what God sees.

        Of course, having written all this in plodder-appropriate language
        for strays like myself, I have to add that the ideal of genuine joy
        and, yes, even cheer, is what we entry-level folks are aiming at. It
        was said of Blessed Titus Brandsma, a Carmelite university professor
        killed by the Nazis for opposing their regime in Holland, that he
        seemed as happy in prison as if he had been in his monastery.

        One witness said it seemed to make no difference to him. His mind was
        always on others. They could only tell he had been beaten by the
        blood on his jacket and when someone commented on the fact, he would
        downplay it and change the subject. He was always cheerful and
        gracious. After two prisons, the Germans sent him to Dachau, where
        his weakened condition made him fodder for their "medical"
        experiments. He lasted less than a month there, killed by a lethal
        injection in July, 1942.

        Blessed Titus was a gentle, cultured man, an intellectual giant whose
        academic world had no shadow of the horrors that were his end.
        Fortunately, for him and for us, Blessed Titus truly understood what
        he had studied and it made him a great saint.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX IMPORTANT, PLEASE NOTE: I rarely check messages on lists web sites and, owing to volume, am no mail on all the lists to which I send these reflections.
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 22, 2006
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          +PAX

          IMPORTANT, PLEASE NOTE: I rarely check messages on lists' web sites and,
          owing to volume, am no mail on all the lists to which I send these reflections.
          Please send all prayer requests with prayer in subject line to my personal
          address: _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...) If you send them
          to the lists, I am quite likely to miss them, as I nearly did today.
          Thoughtful Michael LoPiccolo forwarded one to me and I am so grateful. Say an extra
          prayer for him!

          Prayers, please, for Verna, breast cancer spreading after her treatment,
          more aggressive treatment needed and she is very disconsolate. Prayers for
          Marialyce, herniated disc and bone spurs in her neck, sensory changes, muscle
          spasms and right arm weakness, hoping to avoid surgery with physical therapy.

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Fr. Bartholomew, OSB, of St.
          John's, and for all who mourn him. Prayers for Mark Lepper, who will be
          ordained and installed as associate pastor at First Lutheran Church, Belle Plain,
          MN, on this Sunday. Bob, whose liver transplant we prayed for, suffered an
          apparent seizure, quite an unexpected complication, cause unknown. So far the
          liver seems OK, but prayers for him, his wife Petrina and their sons, Justin,
          Jake and Jesse. Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Frank, who
          died of cancer, for his wife, Janet, and their young sons, Jonathan and James.

          Little Emma, for whom we have been praying after her motorcycle accident
          riding with her step dad, is still in pediatric intensive care - undergoing
          extensive reconstructive surgery and allografts, for the damage to her legs.
          (One foot alone has forty fractures, both upper and lower legs broken, muscle
          mass torn away by being dragged by the truck...). She is not out of the woods
          by a long shot. Prayers for the truck driver who hit her and her step-dad .
          The driver is in anguish too. Prayers for a 21 year old woman who hemorrhaged
          so badly after delivering her first child that a hysterectomy was necessary.
          The baby is fine, mother is still in precarious condition. Prayers for
          Natalie, abnormalities on her stress test and now must have a more thorough, 3 hour
          chemical stress test. May God fill her with calm and serenity and love of
          His perfect will!

          January 23, May 24, September 23
          Chapter 5: On Obedience

          But this very obedience
          will be acceptable to God and pleasing to all
          only if what is commanded is done
          without hesitation, delay, lukewarmness, grumbling, or objection.
          For the obedience given to Superiors is given to God,
          since He Himself has said,
          "He who hears you, hears Me" (Luke 10:16).
          And the disciples should offer their obedience with a good will,
          for "God loves a cheerful giver" (2 Cor. 9:7).
          For if the disciple obeys with an ill will
          and murmurs,
          not necessarily with his lips but simply in his heart,
          then even though he fulfill the command
          yet his work will not be acceptable to God,
          who sees that his heart is murmuring.
          And, far from gaining a reward for such work as this,
          he will incur the punishment due to murmurers,
          unless he amend and make satisfaction.

          REFLECTION

          Trust me, folks, I am not second-guessing St. Benedict on this one, I
          just think there is a chance that he is often misread and that
          something not at all contrary to his precepts needs to be emphasized.

          Few who share my cynical bent would fail to chafe at a reading of
          this passage which implies that we must all be cheerful, Pollyanna
          optimists, blithely smiling automatons. Yes, we are told not to
          murmur, and to put the very best face on our obedience that we
          possibly can. Often the real miracle of grace is that we can just
          barely obey in silence, without any comment at all. No doubt that is
          a tender mercy to those who live with us! We must not read St.
          Benedict harshly, even less so God. We must keep the loving parent
          image ever before our eyes in both instances.

          I want to expand the image of the non-murmuring heart a bit.Some days
          one's heart cannot murmur, because it is numb and paralyzed, unable
          to do much of anything more explicit than ache. Some days one's heart
          is Ground Zero, and everything coming at it seems to be just one more
          horrible plane. Never, never think that St. Benedict is telling us to
          put a happy face on this. A brave face or even a blank expressionless
          one may be all one can muster.

          However, and here's the rub, even when that brave or expressionless
          face is all we can do, we can STILL obey cheerfully. How? Well, for
          one thing, that cheer is in the will, not the emotions. It is the
          readiness of gift. Beyond that, even when sore beset, we can strive
          NOT to complain or whine. Face it, no one but God will really
          understand our most broken points anyhow. The sooner we learn that,
          the less time we will waste on trying to find humans who will.

          How very great is the love of God for us at such times. A favorite
          image I have used before is very apt here: the heart of God is like a
          Mother's refrigerator door, plastered with children's bad, even
          ghastly art. (OK, I KNOW it may be age-appropriate art, but bear with
          me on this one....)

          God is bursting and beaming with pride at our struggling efforts. He
          cares not a wit that we are not beaming with feigned cheer ourselves.
          With all that mud on our faces, who could see the forced smile
          anyhow? There will never be a time, in this world or in the next,
          when God loves us more than He does when we are fallen, crawling on
          all fours and still barely hanging on. The effort, always the effort
          is what God sees.

          Of course, having written all this in plodder-appropriate language
          for strays like myself, I have to add that the ideal of genuine joy
          and, yes, even cheer, is what we entry-level folks are aiming at. It
          was said of Blessed Titus Brandsma, a Carmelite university professor
          killed by the Nazis for opposing their regime in Holland, that he
          seemed as happy in prison as if he had been in his monastery.

          One witness said it seemed to make no difference to him. His mind was
          always on others. They could only tell he had been beaten by the
          blood on his jacket and when someone commented on the fact, he would
          downplay it and change the subject. He was always cheerful and
          gracious. After two prisons, the Germans sent him to Dachau, where
          his weakened condition made him fodder for their "medical"
          experiments. He lasted less than a month there, killed by a lethal
          injection in July, 1942.

          Blessed Titus was a gentle, cultured man, an intellectual giant whose
          academic world had no shadow of the horrors that were his end.
          Fortunately, for him and for us, Blessed Titus truly understood what
          he had studied and it made him a great saint.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          Petersham, MA



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers of deep thanks and HUGE Deo gratias for a very particular grace granted to one who suffers from sexual addictions. One step at a time, but this
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 22, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            +PAX

            Prayers of deep thanks and HUGE Deo gratias for a very particular grace granted to one who suffers from sexual addictions. One step at a time, but this was a big one!

            Prayers for John, on duty in Fallujah, Iraq, and for all his family.

            Prayers for the spiritual, physical and mental health of the folowing and for their families and all wo treat them:

            Sasha, 18, comatose, severely injured in a car wreck when struck by a drunk driver, also for the happy death and eternal rest of her best friend, killed in the wreck, who leaves a 1 year old daughter.

            Steve, a young pilot whose legs were crushed in an accident, 6 months in a wheelchair ahead, ut he hopes to get back to flying to support himself and pay his bills.

            Clarice and Ross, husband and wife who have both had cancer operations in the past. Ross' has returned, and this time cannot be removed, terribly stressful for them both.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God s never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            January 23, May 24, September 23
            Chapter 5: On Obedience

            But this very obedience
            will be acceptable to God and pleasing to all
            only if what is commanded is done
            without hesitation, delay, lukewarmness, grumbling, or objection.
            For the obedience given to Superiors is given to God,
            since He Himself has said,
            "He who hears you, hears Me" (Luke 10:16).
            And the disciples should offer their obedience with a good will,
            for "God loves a cheerful giver" (2 Cor. 9:7).
            For if the disciple obeys with an ill will
            and murmurs,
            not necessarily with his lips but simply in his heart,
            then even though he fulfill the command
            yet his work will not be acceptable to God,
            who sees that his heart is murmuring.
            And, far from gaining a reward for such work as this,
            he will incur the punishment due to murmurers,
            unless he amend and make satisfaction.

            REFLECTION

            Trust me, folks, I am not second-guessing St. Benedict on this one, I
            just think there is a chance that he is often misread and that
            something not at all contrary to his precepts needs to be emphasized.

            Few who share my cynical bent would fail to chafe at a reading of
            this passage which implies that we must all be cheerful, Pollyanna
            optimists, blithely smiling automatons. Yes, we are told not to
            murmur, and to put the very best face on our obedience that we
            possibly can. Often the real miracle of grace is that we can just
            barely obey in silence, without any comment at all. No doubt that is
            a tender mercy to those who live with us! We must not read St.
            Benedict harshly, even less so God. We must keep the loving parent
            image ever before our eyes in both instances.

            I want to expand the image of the non-murmuring heart a bit.Some days
            one's heart cannot murmur, because it is numb and paralyzed, unable
            to do much of anything more explicit than ache. Some days one's heart
            is Ground Zero, and everything coming at it seems to be just one more
            horrible plane. Never, never think that St. Benedict is telling us to
            put a happy face on this. A brave face or even a blank expressionless
            one may be all one can muster.

            However, and here's the rub, even when that brave or expressionless
            face is all we can do, we can STILL obey cheerfully. How? Well, for
            one thing, that cheer is in the will, not the emotions. It is the
            readiness of gift. Beyond that, even when sore beset, we can strive
            NOT to complain or whine. Face it, no one but God will really
            understand our most broken points anyhow. The sooner we learn that,
            the less time we will waste on trying to find humans who will.

            How very great is the love of God for us at such times. A favorite
            image I have used before is very apt here: the heart of God is like a
            Mother's refrigerator door, plastered with children's bad, even
            ghastly art. (OK, I KNOW it may be age-appropriate art, but bear with
            me on this one....)

            God is bursting and beaming with pride at our struggling efforts. He
            cares not a wit that we are not beaming with feigned cheer ourselves.
            With all that mud on our faces, who could see the forced smile
            anyhow? There will never be a time, in this world or in the next,
            when God loves us more than He does when we are fallen, crawling on
            all fours and still barely hanging on. The effort, always the effort
            is what God sees.

            Of course, having written all this in plodder-appropriate language
            for strays like myself, I have to add that the ideal of genuine joy
            and, yes, even cheer, is what we entry-level folks are aiming at. It
            was said of Blessed Titus Brandsma, a Carmelite university professor
            killed by the Nazis for opposing their regime in Holland, that he
            seemed as happy in prison as if he had been in his monastery.

            One witness said it seemed to make no difference to him. His mind was
            always on others. They could only tell he had been beaten by the
            blood on his jacket and when someone commented on the fact, he would
            downplay it and change the subject. He was always cheerful and
            gracious. After two prisons, the Germans sent him to Dachau, where
            his weakened condition made him fodder for their "medical"
            experiments. He lasted less than a month there, killed by a lethal
            injection in July, 1942.

            Blessed Titus was a gentle, cultured man, an intellectual giant whose
            academic world had no shadow of the horrors that were his end.
            Fortunately, for him and for us, Blessed Titus truly understood what
            he had studied and it made him a great saint.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            jeromeleo@...
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA





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