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Holy Rule for July 29

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX A blessed feast of Ss. Martha, Mary and Lazarus, Hosts of the Lord. Benedictines are the only ones to keep the feast of all three in their calendar and,
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 29, 2004
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      +PAX

      A blessed feast of Ss. Martha, Mary and Lazarus, Hosts of the Lord. Benedictines are the only ones to keep the feast of all three in their calendar and, as far as I know, this title, "Hosts of the Lord", occurs nowhere else in the Church calendar of any group. They are the watchful patrons of our guesthouse in Petersham!

      Prayers, please, for Ralph, advanced Parkinson's disease, with lots of problems from desperate treatment measure, and LOTS of problems with faith, also for his wife and his dear friend who asked! Prayers, too, for Connie, who just lost her husband after 8 years of caring for him with Alzheimer's, for his eternal rest and her healing; prayers, too, for their son who would not even come to the funeral. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much. JL

      March 29, July 29, November 28

      Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

      From the Calends of October until the beginning of Lent,
      let them apply themselves to reading
      up to the end of the second hour.

      At the second hour let Terce be said,
      and then let all labor at the work assigned them until None.
      At the first signal for the Hour of None
      let everyone break off from her work,
      and hold herself ready for the sounding of the second signal.
      After the meal
      let them apply themselves to their reading or to the Psalms.

      On the days of Lent,
      from morning until the end of the third hour
      let them apply themselves to their reading,
      and from then until the end of the tenth hour
      let them do the work assigned them.
      And in these days of Lent
      they shall each receive a book from the library,
      which they shall read straight through from the beginning.
      These books are to be given out at the beginning of Lent.

      But certainly one or two of the seniors should be deputed
      to go about the monastery
      at the hours when the sisters are occupied in reading
      and see that there be no lazy sister
      who spends her time in idleness or gossip
      and does not apply herself to the reading,
      so that she is not only unprofitable to herself
      but also distracts others.
      If such a one be found (which God forbid),
      let her be corrected once and a second time;
      if she does not amend,
      let her undergo the punishment of the Rule
      in such a way that the rest may take warning.

      Moreover, one sister shall not associate with another
      at inappropriate times.

      REFLECTION

      The Holy Rule quite rightly forbids us to associate with others at
      inappropriate times. What we need to realize is that inappropriate
      times can be determined by people and situations, as well as
      schedules. Sometimes some things or some people make interaction on
      certain levels not only inappropriate, but downright morally wrong.

      When another person is insistent on pursuing exchanges that are good
      for neither you nor them, it is wrong to associate with that person
      until the climate significantly changes. It is disruptive of peace:
      theirs, yours and those around both of you. Don't be surprised if you
      have difficulty convincing the other party of this state of affairs.
      People often forge full steam ahead because they are, for one reason
      or another, totally blind to the mistakes and damage of doing so.
      People who lack peace themselves are often relentless in their
      attempts to destroy it in others. Don't let them. You need your peace
      for your search for God. Pray for them and calm down.

      Always remember that people in a lot of pain or hurt or anger can
      espouse terribly false and dysfunctional rules of engagement (the war-
      like terminology was not carelessly chosen here,) which probably seem
      entirely healthy, moral and just to them. That is an illusion and
      your obligation of charity in such an instance is not to feed the
      illusion further. At some tragic point, the only help for one who
      persistently plays unhealthy games is to refuse to play at all and
      pray for them. We are morally responsible, in varying degrees, for our
      conscious complicity in further enabling such dysfunction.

      For Christians and especially for monastics, relationships may never
      be totally sundered. There must always be prayer, always concern,
      even if it is perforce indirect, unknown and unseen by any but God.
      One must always pray for the salvation of all. On the other hand,
      even for us, relationships can become so terribly toxic that more
      direct contact is not only unwise, but sometimes even immoral, too.
      If that happens, cling to prayer. It's really all you have in such a
      morass.

      When a relationship is stalled in toxic stalemate, it is wrong to
      continue pounding one's head against the same stone wall interminably
      because of some mistaken notion by either party that charity demands
      it. Charity does no such thing, neither does justice. Charity demands
      the best for all and sometimes that can mean a lot of distance
      bolstered by prayer. Sometimes one has to say "Enough!" Failing to do
      so could be very unjust and a serious disservice to both parties.

      If someone needs help that you cannot, truly cannot provide, for
      heaven's sake urge them to get it, but don't go on delaying the
      process by helping them expend energy on useless wheel-spinning. Pray
      for them and move away. Offer to come back when you CAN be of help,
      if such a time ever arrives, but get out of the way of the paramedics
      if you can't give the help necessary. You run the risk of doing much
      more harm than good.

      Always forgive, always pray. But sometimes one can and even must do
      both without returning to business as usual. That is terribly hard
      and, since people in pain can be terribly manipulative, not likely to
      be made any easier for you. Tough it out, though. It is important.
      Neither charity nor justice nor the Gospel nor God Himself require us
      to continue to pummel a thoroughly beaten dead horse into an
      unpalatable, slimy mess, bones, teeth, hooves and all. Don't be deluded
      into thinking that ever. When you have done what you could and
      failed, move away, give someone else a chance, and pray with all your
      heart.

      Love and prayers,

      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Marion, prognosis of 1 year to live from emphysema, and for John, her husband of nearly 50 years, also for Danielle, preparing to
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 29, 2005
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        +PAX
        Prayers, please, for Marion, prognosis of 1 year to live from emphysema, and for John, her husband of nearly 50 years, also for Danielle, preparing to handle college classes this fall along with a family of seven to care for, and for a young woman newly pregnant with a history of miscarriage. Prayers for a new mom learning to balance duties with her first infant. Prayers for Natalie and Fr. Isaac, and for all delegates on their way to the Oblate conference in Yankton, SD. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL
        March 29, July 29, November 28

        Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

        From the Calends of October until the beginning of Lent,
        let them apply themselves to reading
        up to the end of the second hour.

        At the second hour let Terce be said,
        and then let all labor at the work assigned them until None.
        At the first signal for the Hour of None
        let everyone break off from her work,
        and hold herself ready for the sounding of the second signal.
        After the meal
        let them apply themselves to their reading or to the Psalms.

        On the days of Lent,
        from morning until the end of the third hour
        let them apply themselves to their reading,
        and from then until the end of the tenth hour
        let them do the work assigned them.
        And in these days of Lent
        they shall each receive a book from the library,
        which they shall read straight through from the beginning.
        These books are to be given out at the beginning of Lent.

        But certainly one or two of the seniors should be deputed
        to go about the monastery
        at the hours when the sisters are occupied in reading
        and see that there be no lazy sister
        who spends her time in idleness or gossip
        and does not apply herself to the reading,
        so that she is not only unprofitable to herself
        but also distracts others.
        If such a one be found (which God forbid),
        let her be corrected once and a second time;
        if she does not amend,
        let her undergo the punishment of the Rule
        in such a way that the rest may take warning.

        Moreover, one sister shall not associate with another
        at inappropriate times.

        REFLECTION
        [CAUTION: If the person involved with dysfunction mentioned here lives with you, a LOT has to be read differently.
        In that case, you must detach yourself ( a hard thing to do!) from your own investments in things and leave things
        to God with a holy indifference. Don't be surprised if this doesn't happen for a LONG time, but that fact alone points
        to the sad truth that if something is STILL ringing all our bells, we have a problem in us we need to fix. Indifference
        is not the same as apathy, it is a very strong struggle against the self.]


        The Holy Rule quite rightly forbids us to associate with others at
        inappropriate times. What we need to realize is that inappropriate
        times can be determined by people and situations, as well as
        schedules. Sometimes some things or some people make interaction on
        certain levels not only inappropriate, but downright morally wrong.

        When another person is insistent on pursuing exchanges that are good
        for neither you nor them, it is wrong to associate with that person in such ways
        until the climate significantly changes. It is disruptive of peace:
        theirs, yours and those around both of you. Don't be surprised if you
        have difficulty convincing the other party of this state of affairs.
        People often forge full steam ahead because they are, for one reason
        or another, totally blind to the mistakes and damage of doing so.
        People who lack peace themselves are often relentless in their
        attempts to destroy it in others. Don't let them. You need your peace
        for your search for God. Pray for them and calm down.

        Always remember that people in a lot of pain or hurt or anger can
        espouse terribly false and dysfunctional rules of engagement (the war-
        like terminology was not carelessly chosen here,) which probably seem
        entirely healthy, moral and just to them. That is an illusion and
        your obligation of charity in such an instance is not to feed the
        illusion further. At some tragic point, the only help for one who
        persistently plays unhealthy games is to refuse to play at all and
        pray for them. We are morally responsible, in varying degrees, for our
        conscious complicity in further enabling such dysfunction.

        For Christians and especially for monastics, relationships may never
        be totally sundered. There must always be prayer, always concern,
        even if it is perforce indirect, unknown and unseen by any but God.
        One must always pray for the salvation of all. On the other hand,
        even for us, relationships can become so terribly toxic that more
        direct contact is not only unwise, but sometimes even immoral, too.
        If that happens, cling to prayer. It's really all you have in such a
        morass.

        When a relationship is stalled in toxic stalemate, it is wrong to
        continue pounding one's head against the same stone wall interminably
        because of some mistaken notion by either party that charity demands
        it. Charity does no such thing, neither does justice. Charity demands
        the best for all and sometimes that can mean a lot of distance
        bolstered by prayer. Sometimes one has to say "Enough!" Failing to do
        so could be very unjust and a serious disservice to both parties.

        If someone needs help that you cannot, truly cannot provide, for
        heaven's sake urge them to get it, but don't go on delaying the
        process by helping them expend energy on useless wheel-spinning. Pray
        for them and move away. Offer to come back when you CAN be of help,
        if such a time ever arrives, but get out of the way of the paramedics
        if you can't give the help necessary. You run the risk of doing much
        more harm than good.

        Always forgive, always pray. But sometimes one can and even must do
        both without returning to business as usual. That is terribly hard
        and, since people in pain can be terribly manipulative, not likely to
        be made any easier for you. Tough it out, though. It is important.
        Neither charity nor justice nor the Gospel nor God Himself require us
        to continue to pummel a thoroughly beaten dead horse into an
        unpalatable, slimy mess, bones, teeth, hooves and all. Don't be deluded
        into thinking that ever. When you have done what you could and
        failed, move away, give someone else a chance, and pray with all your
        heart.

        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers for our guesthouse, on its patronal feast of Sts. Martha, Mary and Lazarus, Hosts of the Lord, and for all our guests! Prayers for a return to the
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 28, 2007
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          +PAX

          Prayers for our guesthouse, on its patronal feast of Sts. Martha, Mary and Lazarus, Hosts of the Lord, and for all our guests!

          Prayers for a return to the faith for Elwood, Nicole and Tony.

          Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, and for all their families and all who treat or care for them:

          Earl, bone cancer, prostate cancer, in severe pain, and especially for his brother, Don.

          Erin, multiple health issues and doctors are still unable to establish their cause.

          Daniel, severe PTSD after returning from Iraq.

          Will, for whom we prayed a few months ago, has been in a very serious car accident and has massive internal injuries. Being kept unconscious as they cannot do more surgery for a few days, and for Mom and his sister, Cate, especially.

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, and for all their families and those who mourn them:

          Ann, died this week, and for her great-niece, Jeanette.

          All who were killed in the crash of two TV news helicopters. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

          From the Calends of October until the beginning of Lent, let them apply
          themselves to reading up to the end of the second hour.

          At the second hour let Terce be said, and then let all labor at the work
          assigned them until None. At the first signal for the Hour of None let
          everyone break off from her work, and hold herself ready for the
          sounding of the second signal. After the meal
          let them apply themselves to their reading or to the Psalms.

          On the days of Lent, from morning until the end of the third hour
          let them apply themselves to their reading, and from then until the end
          of the tenth hour let them do the work assigned them.
          And in these days of Lent they shall each receive a book from the
          library, which they shall read straight through from the beginning.
          These books are to be given out at the beginning of Lent.

          But certainly one or two of the seniors should be deputed to go about
          the monastery at the hours when the sisters are occupied in reading and
          see that there be no lazy sister who spends her time in idleness or
          gossip and does not apply herself to the reading,
          so that she is not only unprofitable to herself but also distracts
          others. If such a one be found (which God forbid), let her be corrected
          once and a second time; if she does not amend, let her undergo the
          punishment of the Rule in such a way that the rest may take warning.

          Moreover, one sister shall not associate with another at inappropriate
          times.

          REFLECTION

          [CAUTION: If the person involved with dysfunction mentioned here lives
          with you, a LOT has to be read differently. In that case, you must
          detach yourself ( a hard thing to do!) from your own
          investments in things and leave things to God with a holy indifference.
          Don't be surprised if this doesn't happen for a
          LONG time, but that fact alone points to the sad truth that if something
          is STILL ringing all our bells, we have a problem in us we need to fix.
          Indifference is not the same as apathy, it is a very strong struggle
          against the self.]


          The Holy Rule quite rightly forbids us to associate with others at
          inappropriate times. What we need to realize is that inappropriate
          times can be determined by people and situations, as well as
          schedules. Sometimes some things or some people make interaction on
          certain levels not only inappropriate, but downright morally wrong.

          When another person is insistent on pursuing exchanges that are good for
          neither you nor them, it is wrong to associate with that person in such
          ways until the climate significantly changes. It is disruptive of peace:
          theirs, yours and those around both of you. Don't be surprised if you
          have difficulty convincing the other party of this state of affairs.

          People often forge full steam ahead because they are, for one reason or
          another, totally blind to the mistakes and damage of doing so. People
          who lack peace themselves are often relentless in their attempts to
          destroy it in others, wittingly or unwittingly. Don't let them. You need
          your peace for your search for God. Pray for them and calm down.

          Always remember that people in a lot of pain or hurt or anger can
          espouse terribly false and dysfunctional rules of engagement (the war-
          like terminology was not carelessly chosen here,) which probably seem
          entirely healthy, moral and just to them. That is an illusion and your
          obligation of charity in such an instance is not to feed the illusion
          further. At some tragic point, the only help for one who persistently
          plays unhealthy games is to refuse to play at all and pray for them. We
          are morally responsible, in varying degrees, for our conscious
          complicity in further enabling such dysfunction.

          For Christians and especially for monastics, relationships may never be
          totally sundered. There must always be prayer, always concern, even if
          it is perforce indirect, unknown and unseen by any but God. One must
          always pray for the salvation of all. On the other hand, even for us,
          relationships can become so terribly toxic that more direct contact is
          not only unwise, but sometimes even immoral, too. If that happens, cling
          to prayer. It's really all you have in such a morass.

          When a relationship is stalled in toxic stalemate, it is wrong to
          continue pounding one's head against the same stone wall interminably
          because of some mistaken notion by either party that charity demands it.
          Charity does no such thing, neither does justice. Charity demands the
          best for all and sometimes that can mean a lot of distance bolstered by
          prayer. Sometimes one has to say "Enough!" Failing to do so could be
          very unjust and a serious disservice to both parties.

          If someone needs help that you cannot, truly cannot provide, for
          heaven's sake urge them to get it, but don't go on delaying the
          process by helping them expend energy on useless wheel-spinning. Pray
          for them and move away. Offer to come back when you CAN be of help, if
          such a time ever arrives, but get out of the way of the paramedics if
          you can't give the help necessary. You run the risk of doing much more
          harm than good.

          Always forgive, always pray. But sometimes one can and even must do both
          without returning to business as usual. That is terribly hard and, since
          people in pain can be terribly manipulative, not likely to be made any
          easier for you. Tough it out, though. It is important. Neither charity
          nor justice nor the Gospel nor God Himself require us to continue to
          pummel a thoroughly beaten dead horse into an unpalatable, slimy mess,
          bones, teeth, hooves and all. Don't be deluded into thinking that ever.
          When you have done what you could and failed, move away, give someone
          else a chance, and pray with all your heart.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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