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Holy Rule for July 26

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Mary Frances (not ours at Petersham,) overburdened and drained physically, spiritually and emotionally, for an anorexic daughter and
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 26, 2004
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      Prayers, please, for Mary Frances (not ours at Petersham,) overburdened and drained physically, spiritually and emotionally, for an anorexic daughter and her worried parents, that she find healing, and for Nancy, an overwhelming personal problem that has her nearly beyond coping. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much. JL

      March 26, July 26, November 25
      Chapter 46: On Those Who Fail in Any Other Matters

      When anyone is engaged in any sort of work,
      whether in the kitchen, in the cellar, in a shop,
      in the bakery, in the garden, while working at some craft,
      or in any other place,
      and she commits some fault,
      or breaks something, or loses something,
      or transgresses in any other way whatsoever,
      if she does not come immediately
      before the Abbess and the community
      of her own accord
      to make satisfaction and confess her fault,
      then when it becomes known through another,
      let her be subjected to a more severe correction.

      But if the sin-sickness of the soul is a hidden one,
      let her reveal it only to the Abbess or to a spiritual mother,
      who knows how to cure her own and others' wounds
      without exposing them and making them public.


      REFLECTION

      The Chapter of Faults, wherein monastics confessed public, external
      faults, had become rather silly the way it was practiced before
      Vatican II. I remember, years ago, seeing a glossary list of Latin
      phrases used to describe different faults. As practiced, I'm not sure
      it was the most useful thing in the world at all.

      However, look at the kernel here, important for both monasteries and
      families: communication. What St. Benedict wrote about was not the
      formalized and largely empty ritual that the late 20th century had
      come to know, it was an airing session of sorts. These can be very
      useful. People in any life are often reluctant to open up about what
      bothers them, monastics are often even more so! To provide a
      structured way and time to do so might have given some just the extra
      distance and protection they needed.

      Slights and wrongs and hurts that lie hidden and unexpressed can
      fester into a spreading, malignant growth. Note that the Holy Rule
      bids us never let the sun set on our anger. We have to get the things
      that REALLY bother us out. This hardly means a free for all, that
      would be very contrary to the whole spirit of the Rule, but it does
      mean that genuine differences must be solved in an open and
      respectful and humble way.

      The way for today's community or family may not be to do this all
      together- but then again that might not be all bad, occasionally. At
      any rate and however we do it, St. Benedict asks us to own up to our
      failures and those of others because he knows it is terribly damaging
      not to do so. A important item here is that the all the members must
      feel safe to express themselves. How many kids who were afraid to
      open their mouths to a parent about really serious troubles in their
      relationship are still in therapy years later?

      Whether alone or in a group, when we confess our fault to others, we
      lighten our load. When we honestly and gently tell others that they
      have hurt us or wronged us, we are often surprised to find that they
      were unaware of having done so- no wonder they "keep right on doing
      it!" We can also be wonderfully surprised at the depth of feeling
      with which apologies may be made. Very often the gentle and loving
      exposure of a problem between people gives us remarkable
      opportunities to show our nobler side and to see that side of our
      brothers and sisters.

      The goal of this is peace, so it must never be done for any other
      motive, for anything less than loving. There is the danger that we
      lose track of the important "difference between the virtue of honesty
      and the vice of brutal frankness" as my friend, Fr. Roger used to
      say. This must never become an accepted arena for getting back at one
      another. The whole purpose here is to end strife, not perpetuate it.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Ann, and for all our Anns and Joachims on this feast of Sts. Ann and Joachim. Prayers, please, for Doug, diabetic and
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 26, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers for the eternal rest of Ann, and for all our Anns and Joachims on this feast of Sts. Ann and Joachim.

        Prayers, please, for Doug, diabetic and double transplant of spleen and kidney. Spleen is already working, kidney they won't know about for a few days. Prayers for Mohamad, a recent immigrant, robbed for cigarettes while working in a convenience store, shot in the head and the bullet lodged in his brain cannot be removed. Has a pregnant wife due in September. Prayers for them both and for the one who shot him. Prayers for Brendan and Basil, seeking a faith home in a parish. Prayers, too, for Jonathan, being invested as an Oblate novice on August 3. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 26, July 26, November 25
        Chapter 46: On Those Who Fail in Any Other Matters

        When anyone is engaged in any sort of work,
        whether in the kitchen, in the cellar, in a shop,
        in the bakery, in the garden, while working at some craft,
        or in any other place,
        and she commits some fault,
        or breaks something, or loses something,
        or transgresses in any other way whatsoever,
        if she does not come immediately
        before the Abbess and the community
        of her own accord
        to make satisfaction and confess her fault,
        then when it becomes known through another,
        let her be subjected to a more severe correction.

        But if the sin-sickness of the soul is a hidden one,
        let her reveal it only to the Abbess or to a spiritual mother,
        who knows how to cure her own and others' wounds
        without exposing them and making them public.


        REFLECTION

        The Chapter of Faults, wherein monastics confessed public, external
        faults, had become rather silly the way it was practiced before
        Vatican II. I remember, years ago, seeing a glossary list of Latin
        phrases used to describe different faults. As practiced, I'm not sure
        it was the most useful thing in the world at all.

        However, look at the kernel here, important for both monasteries and
        families: communication. What St. Benedict wrote about was not the
        formalized and largely empty ritual that the late 20th century had
        come to know, it was an airing session of sorts. These can be very
        useful. People in any life are often reluctant to open up about what
        bothers them, monastics are often even more so! To provide a
        structured way and time to do so might have given some just the extra
        distance and protection they needed.

        Slights and wrongs and hurts that lie hidden and unexpressed can
        fester into a spreading, malignant growth. Note that the Holy Rule
        bids us never let the sun set on our anger. We have to get the things
        that REALLY bother us out. This hardly means a free for all, that
        would be very contrary to the whole spirit of the Rule, but it does
        mean that genuine differences must be solved in an open and
        respectful and humble way.

        The way for today's community or family may not be to do this all
        together- but then again that might not be all bad, occasionally. At
        any rate and however we do it, St. Benedict asks us to own up to our
        failures and those of others because he knows it is terribly damaging
        not to do so. A important item here is that the all the members must
        feel safe to express themselves. How many kids who were afraid to
        open their mouths to a parent about really serious troubles in their
        relationship are still in therapy years later?

        Whether alone or in a group, when we confess our fault to others, we
        lighten our load. When we honestly and gently tell others that they
        have hurt us or wronged us, we are often surprised to find that they
        were unaware of having done so- no wonder they "kept right on doing
        it!" We can also be wonderfully surprised at the depth of feeling
        with which apologies may be made. Very often the gentle and loving
        exposure of a problem between people gives us remarkable
        opportunities to show our nobler side and to see that side of our
        brothers and sisters.

        The goal of this is peace, so it must never be done for any other
        motive, for anything less than loving. There is the danger that we
        lose track of the important "difference between the virtue of honesty
        and the vice of brutal frankness" as my friend, Fr. Roger used to
        say. This must never become an accepted arena for getting back at one
        another. The whole purpose here is to end strife, not perpetuate it.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX A blessed feast of Saints Ann and Joachim, blessings and prayers for all who bear their names!! (Though I suspect there are a lot more Anns than Joachims
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 25, 2007
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          +PAX

          A blessed feast of Saints Ann and Joachim, blessings and prayers for all who bear their names!! (Though I suspect there are a lot more Anns than Joachims out there!)

          Deep prayers of Deo gratias and thanksgiving for:

          Dame Andrea, newly elected Abbess of Stanbrook Abbey in England. May God bless her abbatial years with abundant graces for her and all those she leads.

          Jim, whose cataract surgery we prayed for. The procedure went wonderfully well and he can see, his recovery is so quick that a surgery on his other eye is planned soon, so continued prayers. Jim thanks all for the prayers and really attributes his
          wonderful progress to the power of prayer.

          Tom, celebrating 5 wonderful years of sobriety, one day at a time!

          My own joyful reconnection with a family I had lost touch with for 11 years, the Ciampas. God is so good: a postman I met in Burger King today had me talking to my long-lost friend in less than fifteen minutes or so! I had despaired of ever finding them again. God works in VERY wondrous ways....

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following and for all who mourn them:

          Mary, and especially for her daughter, Irene.

          A young mother of small children who hung herself.

          Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, and for all their families and all who treat or care for them:

          Ann Marie, needing a hip replacement and not ready to go ahead with it yet.

          Someone having a terrible time with grief over a loved one's death.

          Dave, painful back dislocation. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 26, July 26, November 25
          Chapter 46: On Those Who Fail in Any Other Matters

          When anyone is engaged in any sort of work, whether in the kitchen, in
          the cellar, in a shop, in the bakery, in the garden, while working at
          some craft, or in any other place, and she commits some fault, or breaks
          something, or loses something, or transgresses in any other way
          whatsoever, if she does not come immediately
          before the Abbess and the community of her own accord
          to make satisfaction and confess her fault, then when it becomes known
          through another, let her be subjected to a more severe correction.

          But if the sin-sickness of the soul is a hidden one, let her reveal it
          only to the Abbess or to a spiritual mother, who knows how to cure her
          own and others' wounds without exposing them and making them public.


          REFLECTION

          The Chapter of Faults, wherein monastics confessed public, external
          faults, had become rather silly the way it was practiced before Vatican
          II. I remember, years ago, seeing a glossary list of Latin phrases used
          to describe different faults. As practiced, I'm not sure it was the most
          useful thing in the world at all.

          However, look at the kernel here, important for both monasteries and
          families: communication. What St. Benedict wrote about was not the
          formalized and largely empty ritual that the late 20th century had come
          to know, it was an airing session of sorts. These can be very useful.
          People in any life are often reluctant to open up about what bothers
          them, monastics are often even more so! To provide a structured way and
          time to do so might have given some just the extra distance and
          protection they needed.

          Slights and wrongs and hurts that lie hidden and unexpressed can
          fester into a spreading, malignant growth. Note that the Holy Rule
          bids us never let the sun set on our anger. We have to get the things
          that REALLY bother us out. This hardly means a free for all, that would
          be very contrary to the whole spirit of the Rule, but it does mean that
          genuine differences must be solved in an open and
          respectful and humble way.

          The way for today's community or family may not be to do this all
          together- but then again that might not be all bad, occasionally. At
          any rate and however we do it, St. Benedict asks us to own up to our
          failures and those of others because he knows it is terribly damaging
          not to do so. A important item here is that the all the members must
          feel safe to express themselves. How many kids who were afraid to open
          their mouths to a parent about really serious troubles in their
          relationship are still in therapy years later?

          Whether alone or in a group, when we confess our fault to others, we
          lighten our load. When we honestly and gently tell others that they have
          hurt us or wronged us, we are often surprised to find that they were
          unaware of having done so- no wonder they "kept right on doing it!" We
          can also be wonderfully surprised at the depth of feeling with which
          apologies may be made. Very often the gentle and loving exposure of a
          problem between people gives us remarkable opportunities to show our
          nobler side and to see that side of our brothers and sisters.

          The goal of this is peace, so it must never be done for any other
          motive, for anything less than loving. There is the danger that we
          lose track of the important "difference between the virtue of honesty
          and the vice of brutal frankness" as my friend, Fr. Roger used to say.
          This must never become an accepted arena for getting back at one
          another. The whole purpose here is to end strife, not perpetuate it.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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