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Holy Rule for July 18

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Mary, CT scan this week for spots on her lungs, and for her daughter, Peggy and family. Some time ago we prayed for Jenn, falsely
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 18, 2004
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Mary, CT scan this week for spots on her lungs, and for her daughter, Peggy and family. Some time ago we prayed for Jenn, falsely accused of child abuse. Last week she was exonerated completely on the charges she has borne in genuine innocence for over a year now. Deo gratias! God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      March 18, July 18, November 17
      Chapter 39: On the Measure of Food

      We think it sufficient for the daily dinner,
      whether at the sixth or the ninth hour,
      that every table have two cooked dishes
      on account of individual infirmities,
      so that he who for some reason cannot eat of the one
      may make his meal of the other
      Therefore let two cooked dishes suffice for all the brethren;
      and if any fruit or fresh vegetables are available,
      let a third dish be added.


      Let a good pound weight of bread suffice for the day,
      whether there be only one meal or both dinner and supper.
      If they are to have supper,
      the cellarer shall reserve a third of that pound,
      to be given them at supper.


      But if it happens that the work was heavier,
      it shall lie within the Abbot's discretion and power,
      should it be expedient,
      to add something to the fare.
      Above all things, however,
      over-indulgence must be avoided
      and a monk must never be overtaken by indigestion;
      for there is nothing so opposed to the Christian character
      as over-indulgence
      according to Our Lord's words,
      "See to it that your hearts be not burdened
      with over-indulgence" (Luke 21:34).


      Young boys
      shall not receive the same amount of food as their elders,
      but less;
      and frugality shall be observed in all circumstances.


      Except the sick who are very weak,
      let all abstain entirely
      from eating the flesh of four-footed animals.

      REFLECTION

      If you are the only Oblate in the family, do NOT try to introduce
      your non-Benedictine children or spouse to the full rigors of this
      chapter. Don't go there... Very bad idea!
      However, there are all kinds of creative ways that you
      can "monasticize" your diet while leaving the family happy!

      If you work outside the home, or most of your family is at work or
      school and you stay home, look at your lunch, or whatever meal you
      eat on your own. That's the place to make changes. You can change the
      amount you eat, maybe even make the time a bit later. Most
      workplaces, struggling to cover all the slots at lunch hour, might be
      glad if you wanted to eat lunch when the others had finished. Check
      it out.

      If you pack and carry your own lunch, you can often find a GREAT
      monastic discipline in making it plain and less often varied. Try
      peanut butter and jelly for a while. Great source of protein and
      antioxidants. Try taking just fruit. Three of the nurses I've worked
      with- and none of them for monastic reasons- ate the same lunch every
      single day. Two of them used to always eat saltines and peanut
      butter, the other ALWAYS ate one can of sardines with crackers.
      Always. Nobody died, but the lounge used to smell awful after Rosa
      dined on her sardines in that small room!

      Rosa's sardine idea might not be fine daily for you, but what about once
      a week, on Fridays, say. One can of sardines and some fat-free saltines.
      Lunch for under a dollar. Great source of fish oil, omega-3 and all that. Also,
      these days, about the only fish one can afford is canned. Sigh... Docs
      recommend three servings a week for cardiac health. That might be a
      lunch idea you can live with!

      What ever you do (and peanut butter and jelly, alas, is not a high
      scorer in this field,) try to make changes in your own diet with an
      eye to health and the ecology. If you are careful not to make a big
      deal of it and to serve really good-tasting food, you can even employ
      these principles to some degree with your family, if you are the
      cook! Lots of meat-stretching dishes over noodles or rice will never
      be thought of as penitential. Some really good beans as a side dish
      are great fiber, great protein, possibly fat-free and CHEAP! Red
      beans (or black beans,) over rice are traditionally ethnic and
      wonderful.

      Try to add healthy elements that will go unnoticed, too. A Franciscan
      hermit who made a retreat here turned me onto a great idea: soy
      powder. She used it for milk shakes, which never quite caught on with
      me. The taste was not great (to me, at least,) and I HATE to clean a
      blender every day. On the other hand, there is about 24 grams of
      protein in 1/3 cup of that stuff, about 33% of your daily
      requirement. Dump a half cup into a bread pudding and it will never
      be noticed. Surely there are other things you can find to sneak it
      into as well!

      I'll just use bread pudding as an example, but you can have a lot of
      fun experimenting with other stuff, too. When I make bread pudding, I
      substitute orange juice for some of the milk.
      Less fat, more vitamin C, and the soy powder more than makes up for
      the bit of protein lost. Tons of fat-free things that don't taste fat-
      free at all can be made with apple sauce. Trust me, I HATE things
      that taste fat-free, so if I like them, your kids will never know.

      Always remember, the best penances are those we do not choose. For
      many of us, that could be as simple as following one's doctor's
      orders on diet carefully. So many things are diet-related and those
      habits are so hard to break. Let you doctor be your abbess in this
      respect and you will not only get healthier in body, but in spirit as
      well!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Fr. Brendan, suffering from hiccups since Friday and painfully worn out. Prayers for Steve, a minister diagnosed with adult leukemia,
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 18, 2005
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Fr. Brendan, suffering from hiccups since Friday and painfully worn out. Prayers for Steve, a minister diagnosed with adult leukemia, and for all his family, prayers, too, for Donna, seriously ill in the hospital. Prayers for Mary Jane, recurrent leukemia after 2 years, requiring another bone marrow transplant, for her brother, Gregory, the donor both times, and all her family. Prayers for Bob, on dialysis and a ventilator after triple bypass surgery, for Linda, his niece, and for all his family. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! thanks so much. JL

        March 18, July 18, November 17
        Chapter 39: On the Measure of Food

        We think it sufficient for the daily dinner,
        whether at the sixth or the ninth hour,
        that every table have two cooked dishes
        on account of individual infirmities,
        so that he who for some reason cannot eat of the one
        may make his meal of the other
        Therefore let two cooked dishes suffice for all the brethren;
        and if any fruit or fresh vegetables are available,
        let a third dish be added.


        Let a good pound weight of bread suffice for the day,
        whether there be only one meal or both dinner and supper.
        If they are to have supper,
        the cellarer shall reserve a third of that pound,
        to be given them at supper.


        But if it happens that the work was heavier,
        it shall lie within the Abbot's discretion and power,
        should it be expedient,
        to add something to the fare.
        Above all things, however,
        over-indulgence must be avoided
        and a monk must never be overtaken by indigestion;
        for there is nothing so opposed to the Christian character
        as over-indulgence
        according to Our Lord's words,
        "See to it that your hearts be not burdened
        with over-indulgence" (Luke 21:34).


        Young boys
        shall not receive the same amount of food as their elders,
        but less;
        and frugality shall be observed in all circumstances.


        Except the sick who are very weak,
        let all abstain entirely
        from eating the flesh of four-footed animals.

        REFLECTION

        If you are the only Oblate in the family, do NOT try to introduce
        your non-Benedictine children or spouse to the full rigors of this
        chapter. Don't go there... Very bad idea!
        However, there are all kinds of creative ways that you
        can "monasticize" your diet while leaving the family happy!

        If you work outside the home, or most of your family is at work or
        school and you stay home, look at your lunch, or whatever meal you
        eat on your own. That's the place to make changes. You can change the
        amount you eat, maybe even make the time a bit later. Most
        workplaces, struggling to cover all the slots at lunch hour, might be
        glad if you wanted to eat lunch when the others had finished. Check
        it out.

        If you pack and carry your own lunch, you can often find a GREAT
        monastic discipline in making it plain and less often varied. Try
        peanut butter and jelly for a while. Great source of protein and
        antioxidants. Try taking just fruit. Three of the nurses I've worked
        with- and none of them for monastic reasons- ate the same lunch every
        single day. Two of them used to always eat saltines and peanut
        butter, the other ALWAYS ate one can of sardines with crackers.
        Always. Nobody died, but the lounge used to smell awful after Rosa
        dined on her sardines in that small room!

        Rosa's sardine idea might not be fine daily for you, but what about once
        a week, on Fridays, say. One can of sardines and some fat-free saltines.
        Lunch for under a dollar. Great source of fish oil, omega-3 and all that. Also,
        these days, about the only fish one can afford is canned. Sigh... Docs
        recommend three servings a week for cardiac health. That might be a
        lunch idea you can live with!

        What ever you do (and peanut butter and jelly, alas, is not a high
        scorer in this field,) try to make changes in your own diet with an
        eye to health and the ecology. If you are careful not to make a big
        deal of it and to serve really good-tasting food, you can even employ
        these principles to some degree with your family, if you are the
        cook! Lots of meat-stretching dishes over noodles or rice will never
        be thought of as penitential. Some really good beans as a side dish
        are great fiber, great protein, possibly fat-free and CHEAP! Red
        beans (or black beans,) over rice are traditionally ethnic and
        wonderful.

        Try to add healthy elements that will go unnoticed, too. A Franciscan
        hermit who made a retreat here turned me onto a great idea: soy
        powder. She used it for milk shakes, which never quite caught on with
        me. The taste was not great (to me, at least,) and I HATE to clean a
        blender every day. On the other hand, there is about 24 grams of
        protein in 1/3 cup of that stuff, about 33% of your daily
        requirement. Dump a half cup into a bread pudding and it will never
        be noticed. Surely there are other things you can find to sneak it
        into as well!

        I'll just use bread pudding as an example, but you can have a lot of
        fun experimenting with other stuff, too. When I make bread pudding, I
        substitute orange juice for some of the milk.
        Less fat, more vitamin C, and the soy powder more than makes up for
        the bit of protein lost. Tons of fat-free things that don't taste fat-
        free at all can be made with apple sauce. Trust me, I HATE things
        that taste fat-free, so if I like them, your kids will never know.

        Always remember, the best penances are those we do not choose. For
        many of us, that could be as simple as following one's doctor's
        orders on diet carefully. So many things are diet-related and those
        habits are so hard to break. Let you doctor be your abbess in this
        respect and you will not only get healthier in body, but in spirit as
        well!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jeromeleo@earthlink.net
        +PAX Prayers for Sr. Gertrude and the new OSB community at Ave Maria University: they now have one novice and a postulant, maybe even two, entering in the
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 18, 2006
          +PAX

          Prayers for Sr. Gertrude and the new OSB community at Ave Maria University: they now have one novice and a postulant, maybe even two, entering in the fall. Deo gratias!

          Prayers, please, for Ted and several members of the Nez Perce Tribe who are traveling to Seattle for the National Tekakwitha Conference for Native American Catholics, for a safe journey and a spiritually rich conference for all! Prayers for Gene, and his roommate, Dunstan, who found him unconscious on the floor yesterday. Gene is hospitalized, but there is so far no diagnosis.

          Prayers for peace in the Middle East and for the safety of all there, prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of all who have died. May they have embraced the Divine Mercy fully at their last moments. We must be careful to pray with the Heart of God, Who never stops loving even the wicked: if He did, all of us sinners would be in great trouble, indeed! True, a sinner can turn from and reject God, but that doesn't change His Love and that is the Love with which we should all be praying for ALL on every side of this terrible mess.

          Prayers for understanding between two long-time friends experiencing some difficulty in their relationship. Prayers for Sr. Theresa, OSB, a wonderful woman who has done much for the Church, now dying of cancer. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. ALl is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL



          March 18, July 18, November 17
          Chapter 39: On the Measure of Food

          We think it sufficient for the daily dinner,
          whether at the sixth or the ninth hour,
          that every table have two cooked dishes
          on account of individual infirmities,
          so that he who for some reason cannot eat of the one
          may make his meal of the other
          Therefore let two cooked dishes suffice for all the brethren;
          and if any fruit or fresh vegetables are available,
          let a third dish be added.


          Let a good pound weight of bread suffice for the day,
          whether there be only one meal or both dinner and supper.
          If they are to have supper, the cellarer shall reserve a third of that pound,
          to be given them at supper.


          But if it happens that the work was heavier,
          it shall lie within the Abbot's discretion and power,
          should it be expedient, to add something to the fare.
          Above all things, however, over-indulgence must be avoided
          and a monk must never be overtaken by indigestion;
          for there is nothing so opposed to the Christian character
          as over-indulgence according to Our Lord's words,
          "See to it that your hearts be not burdened
          with over-indulgence" (Luke 21:34).


          Young boys shall not receive the same amount of food as their elders,
          but less; and frugality shall be observed in all circumstances.


          Except the sick who are very weak,
          let all abstain entirely from eating the flesh of four-footed animals.

          REFLECTION

          If you are the only Oblate in the family, do NOT try to introduce
          your non-Benedictine children or spouse to the full rigors of this
          chapter. Don't go there... Very bad idea! However, there are all
          kinds of creative ways that you can "monasticize" your diet while
          leaving the family happy!

          If you work outside the home, or most of your family is at work or
          school and you stay home, look at your lunch, or whatever meal you
          eat on your own. That's the place to make changes. You can change the
          amount you eat, maybe even make the time a bit later. Most
          workplaces, struggling to cover all the slots at lunch hour, might be
          glad if you wanted to eat lunch when the others had finished. Check
          it out.

          If you pack and carry your own lunch, you can often find a GREAT
          monastic discipline in making it plain and less often varied. Try
          peanut butter and jelly for a while. Great source of protein and
          antioxidants. Try taking just fruit. Three of the nurses I've worked
          with- and none of them for monastic reasons- ate the same lunch every
          single day. Two of them used to always eat saltines and peanut
          butter, the other ALWAYS ate one can of sardines with crackers.
          Always. Nobody died, but the lounge used to smell awful after Rosa
          dined on her sardines in that small room!

          Rosa's sardine idea might not be fine daily for you, but what about once
          a week, on Fridays, say. One can of sardines and some fat-free saltines.
          Lunch for under a dollar. Great source of fish oil, omega-3 and all that. Also,
          these days, about the only fish one can afford is canned. Sigh... Docs
          recommend three servings a week for cardiac health. That might be a
          lunch idea you can live with!

          What ever you do (and peanut butter and jelly, alas, is not a high
          scorer in this field,) try to make changes in your own diet with an
          eye to health and the ecology. If you are careful not to make a big
          deal of it and to serve really good-tasting food, you can even employ
          these principles to some degree with your family, if you are the
          cook! Lots of meat-stretching dishes over noodles or rice will never
          be thought of as penitential. Some really good beans as a side dish
          are great fiber, great protein, possibly fat-free and CHEAP! Red
          beans (or black beans,) over rice are traditionally ethnic and
          wonderful.

          Try to add healthy elements that will go unnoticed, too. A Franciscan
          hermit who made a retreat here turned me onto a great idea: soy
          powder. She used it for milk shakes, which never quite caught on with
          me. The taste was not great (to me, at least,) and I HATE to clean a
          blender every day. On the other hand, there is about 24 grams of protein
          in 1/3 cup of that stuff, about 33% of your daily requirement. Dump a half
          cup into a bread pudding and it will never be noticed. Surely there are
          other things you can find to sneak it into as well!

          I'll just use bread pudding as an example, but you can have a lot of
          fun experimenting with other stuff, too. When I make bread pudding, I
          substitute orange juice for some of the milk. Less fat, more vitamin C,
          and the soy powder more than makes up for the bit of protein lost. Tons
          of fat-free things that don't taste fat- free at all can be made with apple
          sauce. Trust me, I HATE things that taste fat-free, so if I like them, your
          kids will never know.

          Always remember, the best penances are those we do not choose. For
          many of us, that could be as simple as following one's doctor's
          orders on diet carefully. So many things are diet-related and those
          habits are so hard to break. Let you doctor be your abbess in this
          respect and you will not only get healthier in body, but in spirit as
          well!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, and for all their families and all who mourn them: Glenn, died in a boating accident while
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 17, 2007
            +PAX

            Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, and for all their families and all who mourn them:

            Glenn, died in a boating accident while on vacation, also for his wife and son and for the companion in the boat who was rescued and did not die.

            Molly, for whom we prayed. She did not get to die at home as she'd hoped, but her daughter was with her in the hospital till the last moment.

            Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, and for their families and all who treat or care for them:

            Greg, grieving and hopeless after a relationship broke up.

            Jackson, at death's door a year ago when we first prayed for him, and now still with us! Continued prayers and Deo gratias for his health, please.

            Melissa, badly needing to get into Alanon recovery.

            D. lost both parents to death in less than a year in very traumatic circumstances, then was brutally attacked and may lose sight in one eye, now homebound, depressed, terrified and neither seeking nor accepting any help.

            Peggy's husband, perhaps nearing the end of his road with lung cancer, and for Peggy, struggling to care for him at home, since much of his pension and benefits has been lost.

            Baby Ethan, for whom we have prayed, is in ICU, in a drug-induced coma, numerous serious complications. The only good news is that they may be signs that the stem cells from his Dad are working.

            Tony, cardiac problems, numerous stents and one ischemic area in his stress test.

            Deo gratias and continued prayers for Christian, showing more progress, though diagnosed as autistic. His family, especially his grandmother are very grateful for the prayers.

            Skip, multiple clots after bypass surgery and his kidneys are beginning to fail.

            Judy, stage 3 ovarian cancer, optimistic, but seeking prayers.

            Lou, chronic side effects from botched prostate cancer treatment a few years ago.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            March 18, July 18, November 17
            Chapter 39: On the Measure of Food

            We think it sufficient for the daily dinner,
            whether at the sixth or the ninth hour,
            that every table have two cooked dishes
            on account of individual infirmities,
            so that he who for some reason cannot eat of the one
            may make his meal of the other
            Therefore let two cooked dishes suffice for all the brethren;
            and if any fruit or fresh vegetables are available,
            let a third dish be added.


            Let a good pound weight of bread suffice for the day,
            whether there be only one meal or both dinner and supper.
            If they are to have supper, the cellarer shall reserve a third of that pound,
            to be given them at supper.


            But if it happens that the work was heavier,
            it shall lie within the Abbot's discretion and power,
            should it be expedient, to add something to the fare.
            Above all things, however, over-indulgence must be avoided
            and a monk must never be overtaken by indigestion;
            for there is nothing so opposed to the Christian character
            as over-indulgence according to Our Lord's words,
            "See to it that your hearts be not burdened
            with over-indulgence" (Luke 21:34).


            Young boys shall not receive the same amount of food as their elders,
            but less; and frugality shall be observed in all circumstances.


            Except the sick who are very weak,
            let all abstain entirely from eating the flesh of four-footed animals.

            REFLECTION

            If you are the only Oblate in the family, do NOT try to introduce
            your non-Benedictine children or spouse to the full rigors of this
            chapter. Don't go there... Very bad idea! However, there are all
            kinds of creative ways that you can "monasticize" your diet while
            leaving the family happy!

            If you work outside the home, or most of your family is at work or
            school and you stay home, look at your lunch, or whatever meal you
            eat on your own. That's the place to make changes. You can change the
            amount you eat, maybe even make the time a bit later. Most
            workplaces, struggling to cover all the slots at lunch hour, might be
            glad if you wanted to eat lunch when the others had finished. Check
            it out.

            If you pack and carry your own lunch, you can often find a GREAT
            monastic discipline in making it plain and less often varied. Try
            peanut butter and jelly for a while. Great source of protein and
            antioxidants. Try taking just fruit. Three of the nurses I've worked
            with- and none of them for monastic reasons- ate the same lunch every
            single day. Two of them used to always eat saltines and peanut
            butter, the other ALWAYS ate one can of sardines with crackers.
            Always. Nobody died, but the lounge used to smell awful after Rosa
            dined on her sardines in that small room!

            Rosa's sardine idea might not be fine daily for you, but what about once
            a week, on Fridays, say. One can of sardines and some fat-free saltines.
            Lunch for under a dollar. Great source of fish oil, omega-3 and all that. Also,
            these days, about the only fish one can afford is canned. Sigh... Docs
            recommend three servings a week for cardiac health. That might be a
            lunch idea you can live with!

            What ever you do (and peanut butter and jelly, alas, is not a high
            scorer in this field,) try to make changes in your own diet with an
            eye to health and the ecology. If you are careful not to make a big
            deal of it and to serve really good-tasting food, you can even employ
            these principles to some degree with your family, if you are the
            cook! Lots of meat-stretching dishes over noodles or rice will never
            be thought of as penitential. Some really good beans as a side dish
            are great fiber, great protein, possibly fat-free and CHEAP! Red
            beans (or black beans,) over rice are traditionally ethnic and
            wonderful.

            Try to add healthy elements that will go unnoticed, too. A Franciscan
            hermit who made a retreat here turned me onto a great idea: soy
            powder. She used it for milk shakes, which never quite caught on with
            me. The taste was not great (to me, at least,) and I HATE to clean a
            blender every day. On the other hand, there is about 24 grams of protein
            in 1/3 cup of that stuff, about 33% of your daily requirement. Dump a half
            cup into a bread pudding and it will never be noticed. Surely there are
            other things you can find to sneak it into as well!

            I'll just use bread pudding as an example, but you can have a lot of
            fun experimenting with other stuff, too. When I make bread pudding, I
            substitute orange juice for some of the milk. Less fat, more vitamin C,
            and the soy powder more than makes up for the bit of protein lost. Tons
            of fat-free things that don't taste fat- free at all can be made with apple
            sauce. Trust me, I HATE things that taste fat-free, so if I like them, your
            kids will never know.

            Always remember, the best penances are those we do not choose. For
            many of us, that could be as simple as following one's doctor's
            orders on diet carefully. So many things are diet-related and those
            habits are so hard to break. Let you doctor be your abbess in this
            respect and you will not only get healthier in body, but in spirit as
            well!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            jeromeleo@...
            Petersham, MA



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of the three police officers shot in Baton Rouge, for the others wounded and for the families of all, as well as for the
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 17, 2016
              +PAX



              Prayers for the eternal rest of the three police officers shot in Baton
              Rouge, for the others wounded and for the families of all, as well as for
              the repentance of the suspects, one of whom is dead. Prayers for all
              involved in this awful tragedy and for the safety of police officers
              everywhere.



              Prayers for Fr. Luke, OSB, of Valyermo, California, ill and in pain, he
              will be having surgery. Prayers for his health and speedy recovery.



              Prayers for Vince, on his birthday, which was yesterday. Graces galore and
              many more, ad multos annos.



              Prayers for Joe, 93, in ICU after a heart attack, but probably going to
              hospice. Ardent prayers that he reconcile with his son and one of his
              daughters, whom he will not see. Prayers for the other daughter, Patty, who
              is trying to take care of him. Prayers that he gets all the Sacraments and
              has a happy death, should God call him.



              Prayers for the eternal rest of John, 46, who took his own life, and for his
              wife and small kids and all their family and all who mourn him.

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
              mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              March 18, July 18, November 17
              Chapter 39: On the Measure of Food

              We think it sufficient for the daily dinner,
              whether at the sixth or the ninth hour,
              that every table have two cooked dishes
              on account of individual infirmities,
              so that he who for some reason cannot eat of the one
              may make his meal of the other
              Therefore let two cooked dishes suffice for all the brethren;
              and if any fruit or fresh vegetables are available,
              let a third dish be added.


              Let a good pound weight of bread suffice for the day,
              whether there be only one meal or both dinner and supper.
              If they are to have supper,
              the cellarer shall reserve a third of that pound,
              to be given them at supper.


              But if it happens that the work was heavier,
              it shall lie within the Abbot's discretion and power,
              should it be expedient,
              to add something to the fare.
              Above all things, however,
              over-indulgence must be avoided
              and a monk must never be overtaken by indigestion;
              for there is nothing so opposed to the Christian character
              as over-indulgence
              according to Our Lord's words,
              "See to it that your hearts be not burdened
              with over-indulgence" (Luke 21:34).


              Young boys
              shall not receive the same amount of food as their elders,
              but less;
              and frugality shall be observed in all circumstances.


              Except the sick who are very weak,
              let all abstain entirely
              from eating the flesh of four-footed animals.

              REFLECTION

              The Benedictine golden mean is that of the Lord Himself: we avoid
              over-indulgence because it burdens our hearts. This is true of any
              over-indulgence: food, drink, property. Our hearts are truly burdened
              by our excess, weighed down, kept from flight. Our hearts lag and
              fall with the awful results of having ourselves in charge of them!

              For those in the developed countries, this chapter on food can be a
              very good starting point of surrender. The Western nations in general
              and the U.S. in particular are spoiled rotten with food. Our notoriously
              poor
              diet choices are to blame for many health risks and I confess that I am
              just as guilty as anyone, even if I am trying to do a little better. Might
              not food be one of the healthiest and most logical places for ascetic
              striving
              to begin?

              The questions of diet raised here were looked at in purely monastic
              terms, as self-denial and penitential living. No one knew about
              cholesterol or fiber or many of the illnesses associated today with
              eating habits.. Wasn't in their vocabulary.

              Today we know that the
              eating habits encouraged here are worth a lot more than simple
              asceticism, they are healthy. Given that, something a lot more
              binding than the Holy Rule bids us look more closely: the 5th
              commandment, which insists that we not kill ourselves, either, that
              we guard our health.

              Granted, the times of meals stated here do not fit very well into a
              40 hour week of work and school. Not to worry. Our call here is to
              adapt. The content of monastic meals can be a big boon to health.
              Less meat, more beans, less beef, more chicken, buy decent bread and
              eat more of it. Or make your own! (Remember that bread machine that
              hardly got used after Christmas?) These are things one can gradually
              introduce to a family, too, provided one is a good cook. An extra
              meatless day or two a week is hardly noticed if you serve really good
              fare. Try dishes from the peasant cuisines of the world that stretch
              a very little meat a very long way.

              This Benedictine-inspired diet will not only be better for you and
              your family, it will benefit the planet, too. Grain-fed beef makes a
              horrible dent in the ecology and economy of the world, to say nothing
              of throwing effort and harvests into cattle that could feed starving
              human beings.

              Remember that earlier injunction about treating the goods of the
              monastery as sacred vessels of the altar? Well, the greatest goods
              any monastery or family has are its members and the planet that
              supports them. To own that fact is the beginning of a Benedictine
              ecology. Our diets are excellent places to make choices healthy for
              us and all the planet. We need to find the balance- and that is often hard.
              But, with God's help and mercy, we can do all!

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • russophile2002
              +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Fr. Basil Yender, OSB, 74, of Marmion Abbey, and for his Community, family, and all who mourn him. Prayers for Vince. M.,
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 17

                +PAX

                 

                Prayers for the eternal rest of Fr. Basil Yender, OSB, 74, of Marmion Abbey, and for his Community, family, and all who mourn him.

                 

                Prayers for Vince. M., on his birthday, graces galore and many more. Ad multos annos!

                 

                Prayers for the eternal rest of 28 killed in a prison riot in Acapulco, Mexico, there may have been occult ritual connections, and prayers for their families and all who mourn them. Prayers for the repentance of the killers.

                 

                Prayers for John who took his life yesterday and his family.

                 

                Prayers for Barbara, Tom’s Mom, she has pneumonia, prayers that she recovers quickly.

                 

                Prayers for Allison, 18 months, she has been sick since birth and now has been sent home, there may be nothing more they can do for her.

                 

                Prayers for Teresita M., for fast recovery  and strength and for the grace of the Lord be with her and for her family .

                 

                Prayers for Terell, who had his tonsils removed only to find they were malignant. He must have a PET scan this week and is getting a second opinion as to courses of treatment that will be open to him.

                Prayers for Nicole, that she returns to the Faith and Sacraments.

                 

                Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
                mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                March 18, July 18, November 17
                Chapter 39: On the Measure of Food

                We think it sufficient for the daily dinner,
                whether at the sixth or the ninth hour,
                that every table have two cooked dishes
                on account of individual infirmities,
                so that he who for some reason cannot eat of the one
                may make his meal of the other
                Therefore let two cooked dishes suffice for all the brethren;
                and if any fruit or fresh vegetables are available,
                let a third dish be added.


                Let a good pound weight of bread suffice for the day,
                whether there be only one meal or both dinner and supper.
                If they are to have supper,
                the cellarer shall reserve a third of that pound,
                to be given them at supper.


                But if it happens that the work was heavier,
                it shall lie within the Abbot's discretion and power,
                should it be expedient,
                to add something to the fare.
                Above all things, however,
                over-indulgence must be avoided
                and a monk must never be overtaken by indigestion;
                for there is nothing so opposed to the Christian character
                as over-indulgence
                according to Our Lord's words,
                "See to it that your hearts be not burdened
                with over-indulgence" (Luke 21:34).


                Young boys
                shall not receive the same amount of food as their elders,
                but less;
                and frugality shall be observed in all circumstances.


                Except the sick who are very weak,
                let all abstain entirely
                from eating the flesh of four-footed animals.

                REFLECTION

                The Benedictine golden mean is that of the Lord Himself: we avoid
                over-indulgence because it burdens our hearts. This is true of any
                over-indulgence: food, drink, property. Our hearts are truly burdened
                by our excess, weighed down, kept from flight. Our hearts lag and
                fall with the awful results of having ourselves in charge of them!

                For those in the developed countries, this chapter on food can be a
                very good starting point of surrender. The Western nations in general
                and the U.S. in particular are spoiled rotten with food. Our notoriously
                poor diet choices are to blame for many health risks and I confess that

                I am just as guilty as anyone, even if I am trying to do a little better. Might
                not food be one of the healthiest and most logical places for ascetic
                striving to begin?

                The questions of diet raised here were looked at in purely monastic
                terms, as self-denial and penitential living. No one knew about
                cholesterol or fiber or many of the illnesses associated today with
                eating habits.. Wasn't in their vocabulary.

                Today we know that the eating habits encouraged here are worth a

                lot more than simple asceticism, they are healthy. Given that, something

                a lot more binding than the Holy Rule bids us look more closely: the 5th
                commandment, which insists that we not kill ourselves, either, that
                we guard our health.

                Granted, the times of meals stated here do not fit very well into a
                40 hour week of work and school. Not to worry. Our call here is to
                adapt. The content of monastic meals can be a big boon to health.
                Less meat, more beans, less beef, more chicken, buy decent bread and
                eat more of it. Or make your own! (Remember that bread machine that
                hardly got used after Christmas?) These are things one can gradually
                introduce to a family, too, provided one is a good cook. An extra
                meatless day or two a week is hardly noticed if you serve really good
                fare. Try dishes from the peasant cuisines of the world that stretch
                a very little meat a very long way.

                This Benedictine-inspired diet will not only be better for you and
                your family, it will benefit the planet, too. Grain-fed beef makes a
                horrible dent in the ecology and economy of the world, to say nothing
                of throwing effort and harvests into cattle that could feed starving
                human beings.

                Remember that earlier injunction about treating the goods of the
                monastery as sacred vessels of the altar? Well, the greatest goods
                any monastery or family has are its members and the planet that
                supports them. To own that fact is the beginning of a Benedictine
                ecology. Our diets are excellent places to make choices healthy for
                us and all the planet. We need to find the balance- and that is often hard.
                But, with God's help and mercy, we can do all!

                PS: I know that some, for health reasons, must eat a lot of meat and protein.

                I didn’t mean to include them in pleas for eating les meat!


                Love and prayers,
                Jerome, OSB
                http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                Petersham, MA

                 


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