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Holy Rule for June 19

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX A blessed Feast of St. Romuald to all! Thanks be to God and to St. Romuald for all those Camaldolese monastics that enrich our lives!! Prayers, please,
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 19, 2004
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      +PAX

      A blessed Feast of St. Romuald to all! Thanks be to God and to St.
      Romuald for all those Camaldolese monastics that enrich our lives!!

      Prayers, please, for Steve, 54, who has died, and for his wife and daughter.

      God's will is best! All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much!
      JL

      February 18, June 19, October 19
      Chapter 15: At What Times "Alleluia" Is to Be Said

      From holy Easter until Pentecost without interruption
      let "Alleluia" be said
      both in the Psalms and in the responsories.
      From Pentecost to the beginning of Lent
      let it be said every night
      with the last six Psalms of the Night Office only.
      On every Sunday, however, outside of Lent,
      the canticles, the Morning Office, Prime, Terce, Sext and None
      shall be said with "Alleluia,"
      but Vespers with antiphons.

      The responsories are never to be said with "Alleluia"
      except from Easter to Pentecost.

      REFLECTION

      When I lived in the Byzantine rite for a very happy while, one of the
      things that surprised me was the fact that they still used Alleluia
      in Lent. That sounded strange to my Western ears, but not for long.
      In the West, Alleluia has become virtually nothing but a synonym
      for "Hooray!" In the East, not so. Our Western connection of Alleluia
      as primarily a word of rejoicing reserved for happy times is not
      quite on the mark, with all due apologies to St. Benedict and the
      rest of Western tradition.

      When was the last time you stopped to think that "Amen" really
      meant "So be it"? I do now and then, but usually just parrot the word
      out without a thought. So it is with most people saying
      Alleluia. "Oh, yeah, uh...alleluia...." Alleluia means "Praise the
      Lord." Focus on this and one can readily see why the East still says
      it during Lent.

      Of course, St. Benedict's prescriptions here are a perfect blend of
      change and variety for the Office. They "dress up" the most festive
      times of the years and provide a break from the ordinary. Probably
      what St. Benedict had in mind at the time was that our hearts should
      be so full at Paschaltide that no other words would do: only the
      ineffable stuttering out of "Alleluia!!" would convey our joy. He
      wasn't wrong about that, but saying Alleluia mindlessly misses the
      point.

      So, forgive me, does saying Alleluia only at joyous times. The
      charismatic movement in the 1970's made popular the English
      equivalent of Alleluia: "Praise the Lord!" It was an expression of
      joy and gratitude for whatever God had done for one. Ah, but then
      the "whatever" part of that phrase soon came to be evident! A very
      clever catch phrase evolved for those times when things WEREN'T so
      great, when one had difficulty appreciating what sometimes seems like
      God's decidedly strange sense of humor. On such occasions, they
      said: "Praise the Lord Anyhow!" Now that one is probably closer to
      the real sense of "Alleluia!"

      Our Office and Mass may change in Lent in the Western tradition, but
      our hearts must always and everywhere, in every circumstance,
      say "Alleluia!" and really mean it, really know it.

      Love and prayers and Alleluia!
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@...
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX A blessed feast of Saint Romuald to all our Camaldolese OSB friends. May your founder s prayers fill your own lives with grace and joy! Deo gratias for
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 19, 2005
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        +PAX

        A blessed feast of Saint Romuald to all our Camaldolese OSB friends. May your founder's prayers fill your own lives with grace and joy! Deo gratias for all the gifts their lives bring to the Church, to us all!

        Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for Art and Jean, celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary and for all their family. Many more years! Prayers for Debbie, facing a complicated hip replacement on Monday with a long recovery. Roles reverse and her husband and boys now have to take care of her. May the lessons of grace in that be readily learned by all. Prayers for Anne, tests for some GYN problems, waiting three weeks for final results and waiting is so hard, also for John, her husband. Prayers for Tom, embarking on a pastoral associate job in a very challenging parish, lots to do there! Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much! JL

        [While I did try for a while to add Alleluia to the end of every prayer post, even I got antsy about doing that in Lent. Too often I had to forward a post to people who would not know why I did it, so I shortened it to the very apt translation of "praise Him!"]

        February 18, June 19, October 19
        Chapter 15: At What Times "Alleluia" Is to Be Said

        From holy Easter until Pentecost without interruption
        let "Alleluia" be said
        both in the Psalms and in the responsories.
        From Pentecost to the beginning of Lent
        let it be said every night
        with the last six Psalms of the Night Office only.
        On every Sunday, however, outside of Lent,
        the canticles, the Morning Office, Prime, Terce, Sext and None
        shall be said with "Alleluia,"
        but Vespers with antiphons.

        The responsories are never to be said with "Alleluia"
        except from Easter to Pentecost.

        REFLECTION

        When I lived in the Byzantine rite for a very happy while, one of the
        things that surprised me was the fact that they still used Alleluia
        in Lent. That sounded strange to my Western ears, but not for long.
        In the West, Alleluia has become virtually nothing but a synonym
        for "Hooray!" In the East, not so. Our Western connection of Alleluia
        as primarily a word of rejoicing reserved for happy times is not
        quite on the mark, with all due apologies to St. Benedict and the
        rest of Western tradition.

        When was the last time you stopped to think that "Amen" really
        meant "So be it"? I do now and then, but usually just parrot the word
        out without a thought. So it is with most people saying
        Alleluia. "Oh, yeah, uh...alleluia...." Alleluia means "Praise the
        Lord." Focus on this and one can readily see why the East still says
        it during Lent.

        Of course, St. Benedict's prescriptions here are a perfect blend of
        change and variety for the Office. They "dress up" the most festive
        times of the years and provide a break from the ordinary. Probably
        what St. Benedict had in mind at the time was that our hearts should
        be so full at Paschaltide that no other words would do: only the
        ineffable stuttering out of "Alleluia!!" would convey our joy. He
        wasn't wrong about that, but saying Alleluia mindlessly misses the
        point.

        So, forgive me, does saying Alleluia only at joyous times. The
        charismatic movement in the 1970's made popular the English
        equivalent of Alleluia: "Praise the Lord!" It was an expression of
        joy and gratitude for whatever God had done for one. Ah, but then
        the "whatever" part of that phrase soon came to be evident! A very
        clever catch phrase evolved for those times when things WEREN'T so
        great, when one had difficulty appreciating what sometimes seems like
        God's decidedly strange sense of humor. On such occasions, they
        said: "Praise the Lord Anyhow!" Now that one is probably closer to
        the real sense of "Alleluia!"

        Our Office and Mass may change in Lent in the Western tradition, but
        our hearts must always and everywhere, in every circumstance,
        say "Alleluia!" and really mean it, really know it.

        Love and prayers and Alleluia!
        Jerome, OSB
        jeromeleo@...
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX A blessed feast of Saint Romuald to all our Camaldolese OSB friends. May your founder s prayers fill your own lives with grace and joy! Deo gratias for
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 19, 2006
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          +PAX

          A blessed feast of Saint Romuald to all our Camaldolese OSB friends. May your
          founder's prayers fill your own lives with grace and joy! Deo gratias for all
          the gifts their lives bring to the Church, to us all!

          Prayers for Brian, still suffering after-effects from war experiences years later and for his family. Prayers for Tamie, whose Mom is days away from death and for Tamie, her brother and her fiance, who are caring for her 24/7. Prayers for D., PTSD and alcoholism, in a residential treatment program for some time now, with apparent improvements, Deo gratias! Prayers for Scott, 42, colon resection, years of heavy opiates for back pain are making post-op pain management a problem. Prayers for our prayer folks' families and healthcare professionals treating all those for we pray. Prayers for a very brave high school teacher with only today and tomorrow left of the school year and for another teacher who is retiring at the end of this month. Prayers for Carol's Mom. severe arthritis and osteoporosis pain and prayers of thanksgiving for Carol's daughter, whose job search was successful. Prayers for Br. Finbar, whose birthday was yesterday. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! JL

          [While I did try for a while to add Alleluia to the end of every prayer post,
          even I got antsy about doing that in Lent. Too often I had to forward a post to
          people who would not know why I did it, so I shortened it to the very apt
          translation of "praise Him!"]

          February 18, June 19, October 19
          Chapter 15: At What Times "Alleluia" Is to Be Said

          From holy Easter until Pentecost without interruption
          let "Alleluia" be said
          both in the Psalms and in the responsories.
          From Pentecost to the beginning of Lent
          let it be said every night
          with the last six Psalms of the Night Office only.
          On every Sunday, however, outside of Lent,
          the canticles, the Morning Office, Prime, Terce, Sext and None
          shall be said with "Alleluia,"
          but Vespers with antiphons.

          The responsories are never to be said with "Alleluia"
          except from Easter to Pentecost.

          REFLECTION

          When I lived in the Byzantine rite for a very happy while, one of the
          things that surprised me was the fact that they still used Alleluia
          in Lent. That sounded strange to my Western ears, but not for long.
          In the West, Alleluia has become virtually nothing but a synonym
          for "Hooray!" In the East, not so. Our Western connection of Alleluia
          as primarily a word of rejoicing reserved for happy times is not
          quite on the mark, with all due apologies to St. Benedict and the
          rest of Western tradition.

          When was the last time you stopped to think that "Amen" really
          meant "So be it"? I do now and then, but usually just parrot the word
          out without a thought. So it is with most people saying
          Alleluia. "Oh, yeah, uh...alleluia...." Alleluia means "Praise the
          Lord." Focus on this and one can readily see why the East still says
          it during Lent.

          Of course, St. Benedict's prescriptions here are a perfect blend of
          change and variety for the Office. They "dress up" the most festive
          times of the years and provide a break from the ordinary. Probably
          what St. Benedict had in mind at the time was that our hearts should
          be so full at Paschaltide that no other words would do: only the
          ineffable stammering out of "Alleluia!!" would convey our joy. He
          wasn't wrong about that, but saying Alleluia mindlessly misses the
          point.

          So, forgive me, does saying Alleluia only at joyous times. The
          charismatic movement in the 1970's made popular the English
          equivalent of Alleluia: "Praise the Lord!" It was an expression of
          joy and gratitude for whatever God had done for one. Ah, but then
          the "whatever" part of that phrase soon came to be evident! A very
          clever catch phrase evolved for those times when things WEREN'T so
          great, when one had difficulty appreciating what sometimes seems like
          God's decidedly strange sense of humor. On such occasions, they
          said: "Praise the Lord Anyhow!" Now that one is probably closer to
          the real sense of "Alleluia!"

          Our Office and Mass may change in Lent in the Western tradition, but
          our hearts must always and everywhere, in every circumstance,
          say "Alleluia!" and really mean it, really know it.

          Love and prayers and Alleluia!
          Jerome, OSB
          jeromeleo@...
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX A blessed Feast of Saint Romuald to all our Camaldolese Benedictine brothers and sisters. May he bless his spiritual descendants with his intercession for
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 18, 2007
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            +PAX

            A blessed Feast of Saint Romuald to all our Camaldolese Benedictine brothers and sisters. May he bless his spiritual descendants with his intercession for many graces and great holiness for them all!

            Prayers, please, for Clare and Cintra, both recovering from falls, slowly but surely. Prayers, too, for the happy death and eternal rest of Mary, for her daughter Louise and all their family, and all who mourn her. Prayers for a safe journey home for Sr. Lany Jo. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            February 18, June 19, October 19
            Chapter 15: At What Times "Alleluia" Is to Be Said

            From holy Easter until Pentecost without interruption
            let "Alleluia" be said
            both in the Psalms and in the responsories.
            From Pentecost to the beginning of Lent
            let it be said every night
            with the last six Psalms of the Night Office only.
            On every Sunday, however, outside of Lent,
            the canticles, the Morning Office, Prime, Terce, Sext and None
            shall be said with "Alleluia,"
            but Vespers with antiphons.

            The responsories are never to be said with "Alleluia"
            except from Easter to Pentecost.

            REFLECTION

            When I lived in the Byzantine rite for a very happy while, one of the
            things that surprised me was the fact that they still used Alleluia
            in Lent. That sounded strange to my Western ears, but not for long.
            In the West, Alleluia has become virtually nothing but a synonym
            for "Hooray!" In the East, not so. Our Western connection of Alleluia
            as primarily a word of rejoicing reserved for happy times is not
            quite on the mark, with all due apologies to St. Benedict and the
            rest of Western tradition.

            When was the last time you stopped to think that "Amen" really
            meant "So be it"? I do now and then, but usually just parrot the word
            out without a thought. So it is with most people saying
            Alleluia. "Oh, yeah, uh...alleluia...." Alleluia means "Praise the
            Lord." Focus on this and one can readily see why the East still says
            it during Lent.

            Of course, St. Benedict's prescriptions here are a perfect blend of
            change and variety for the Office. They "dress up" the most festive
            times of the years and provide a break from the ordinary. Probably
            what St. Benedict had in mind at the time was that our hearts should
            be so full at Paschaltide that no other words would do: only the
            ineffable stammering out of "Alleluia!!" would convey our joy. He
            wasn't wrong about that, but saying Alleluia mindlessly misses the
            point.

            So, forgive me, does saying Alleluia only at joyous times. The
            charismatic movement in the 1970's made popular the English
            equivalent of Alleluia: "Praise the Lord!" It was an expression of
            joy and gratitude for whatever God had done for one. Ah, but then
            the "whatever" part of that phrase soon came to be evident! A very
            clever catch phrase evolved for those times when things WEREN'T so
            great, when one had difficulty appreciating what sometimes seems like
            God's decidedly strange sense of humor. On such occasions, they
            said: "Praise the Lord Anyhow!" Now that one is probably closer to
            the real sense of "Alleluia!"

            Our Office and Mass may change in Lent in the Western tradition, but
            our hearts must always and everywhere, in every circumstance,
            say "Alleluia!" and really mean it, really know it.

            Love and prayers and Alleluia!
            Jerome, OSB
            jeromeleo@...
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA



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