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Holy Rule for June 15

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Kate, eye ulcer with possible complications, for Bernie, carotid artery surgery for blockage, for Mike, who awaits a bladder biopsy
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 15, 2004
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Kate, eye ulcer with possible complications, for Bernie, carotid artery surgery for blockage, for Mike, who awaits a bladder biopsy result, and for his wife, Carol. The the eternal rest of Mr. Bennasar, father of Sr. Meg, and for her and all their family, also for the eternal rest of Sr. Susanna, OSB, of Our Lady of Peace Monastery, Missouri. Prayers, too, for the job searches of Lisa and Heather. Last of all, say one for me. It is the anniversary of my profession. Thanks so much! God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, nope NEVER! JL

      February 14, June 15, October 15
      Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

      The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
      recited straight through without an antiphon.
      After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
      then Psalms 117 and 62,
      the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
      148-150);
      then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
      the responsory, the verse,
      the canticle from the Gospel book,
      the litany and so the end.

      REFLECTION

      Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances to the kids WON'T
      slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
      things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
      generally make it through the hoop!

      St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
      and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
      that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
      monastics may have time to gather.

      Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
      late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
      or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
      delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
      two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
      make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
      are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
      and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

      Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
      conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
      is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
      standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
      failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

      St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
      shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
      about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
      or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
      should pass it on!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Fr. Steve Petrica, on the tenth anniversary of his ordination yesterday and for me, on the thirteenth anniversary of my vows today.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 15, 2005
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Fr. Steve Petrica, on the tenth anniversary of his ordination yesterday and for me, on the thirteenth anniversary of my vows today. Deo gratias for our vocations and for all he has given us in these years!

        Andy, for whom we have been praying, died yesterday morning. Prayers for his eternal rest and for wife, family and friends. Prayers, for Karla, 40, a cancer nurse having surgery for what is believed to be ovarian cancer on Thursday. Prayers for Eddie, mourning the loss of his beloved dog that he had for 13 years. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 14, June 15, October 15
        Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

        The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
        recited straight through without an antiphon.
        After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
        then Psalms 117 and 62,
        the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
        148-150);
        then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
        the responsory, the verse,
        the canticle from the Gospel book,
        the litany and so the end.

        REFLECTION

        Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances to the kids WON'T
        slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
        things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
        generally make it through the hoop!

        St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
        and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
        that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
        monastics may have time to gather.

        Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
        late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
        or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
        delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
        two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
        make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
        are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
        and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

        Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
        conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
        is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
        standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
        failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

        Take a self-inventory and check to see if there is anyone you dislike so
        intensely that they cannot be right, no matter what they do. If there are any such
        folks, it's time for you to change, not them! I recall, alas, one pastor who
        annoyed me so much that even when he used incense (something I ordinarily
        love,) I carped to myself that he didn't do it right. With me, he just could NOT
        win. Sigh... When things get that bad, it's ourselves who need the overhaul,
        not the presumed "offender."

        St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
        shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
        about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
        or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
        should pass it on!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Prayers for Fr. Steve, on the 11th anniversary of his ordination yesterday, for Brian s Mom, on her birthday, and for Brian, dealing with her failing
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 15, 2006
          +PAX

          Prayers for Fr. Steve, on the 11th anniversary of his ordination yesterday, for Brian's Mom, on her birthday, and for Brian, dealing with her failing mental capacities. Prayers for Tom, going for an epidural for back pain today. Frank, for whom we have prayed, now has some serious cardiac problems and will need a pacemaker, he is depressed and also has painful cellulitis on his legs and feet. Prayers, too, for Diane, his daughter, and all his family. Prayers for the docs and caretakers that treat all our prayer folk. For a special intention for Peggy. For Adrian, whose badly needed hip operation was delayed yet again, on the very morning of surgery. For Steve, whom we prayed for around Christmas, recurrent cancer and for his brother, Mike and all his family. Also for the many folks hit by an unusual rain in the Washington state, NW US. Cherry crop nearly all ruined, and this affect very poor farm workers, as well as the orchard owners. Prayers for me, on the 14th anniversary of my first vows as a diocesan hermit. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. ALl is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          February 14, June 15, October 15
          Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

          The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
          recited straight through without an antiphon.
          After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
          then Psalms 117 and 62,
          the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
          148-150);
          then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
          the responsory, the verse,
          the canticle from the Gospel book,
          the litany and so the end.

          REFLECTION

          Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances to the kids WON'T
          slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
          things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
          generally make it through the hoop!

          St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
          and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
          that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
          monastics may have time to gather.

          Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
          late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
          or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
          delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
          two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
          make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
          are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
          and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

          Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
          conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
          is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
          standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
          failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

          Take a self-inventory and check to see if there is anyone you dislike so
          intensely that they cannot be right, no matter what they do. If there are any
          such folks, it's time for you to change, not them! I recall, alas, one pastor who
          annoyed me so much that even when he used incense (something I ordinarily
          love,) I carped to myself that he didn't do it right. With me, he just could NOT
          win. Sigh... When things get that bad, it's ourselves who need the overhaul,
          not the presumed "offender."

          St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
          shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
          about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
          or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
          should pass it on!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Belated birthday prayers for Jim L., whose birthday was June 14th. Graces galore and many more, ad multos annos! Linda K., for whom we prayed, has died in
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 14, 2016

            +PAX

            Belated birthday prayers for Jim L., whose birthday was June 14th. Graces galore and many more, ad multos annos!

            Linda K., for whom we prayed, has died in Manila. Prayers for her eternal rest and fro her family and friends and all who mourn her, especially Mary.

            Prayers for Fr. Nadeem, on his birthday, graces galore and many more, ad multos annos!

            Thanks be to God for Mark and Christian, for whom we have prayed after a serious accident involving a fall and electrocution. Mark remains in hospital for burns over 50% of his body but is doing very well. Christian had minor burns on his hands and is credited with saving Mark’s life holding on to him for three hours until help arrived. He is also doing well. Continued prayers for both and for their families.

            Please pray for Heather’s family. They are thankful for a short term solution to a financial crisis and now need permanent solution to move on with their lives.

            Prayers for Nicetas, preparing to make Final Oblation in a few days.

            Prayers for Rose, recurrent cancer and most recent, osteoporosis. Prayers also for her husband who works two jobs to pay medical bills, all the time remaining patient and loving.

            Prayers for Ben, special intention.

            Continued prayers for JS, to complete tough projects and discernment as to what to do next.

            Prayers for Bev, special intention. continued prayers for discernment on a number of issues.

            Deo gratias for prayers answered in the past.

            Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving for the young man who needed the kidney transplant. His brother was a good match and the operation successful. Both are doing well. Continued prayers for their recovery.

            Prayers for Sallie, the mainstay of her parish St. Vincent de Paul conference. She is having a severe flare up with her several types of rheumatoid arthritis. The medicine dosage needed to be reduced and her body is not taking it kindly. Severe pain and impairment of mobility.

            Prayers that the doctors can help Joshua with his knee problems and that he can meet all the responsibilities he has taken on recently.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
            grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            February 14, June 15, October 15
            Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

            The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
            recited straight through without an antiphon.
            After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
            then Psalms 117 and 62,
            the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
            148-150);
            then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
            the responsory, the verse,
            the canticle from the Gospel book,
            the litany and so the end.

            REFLECTION

            Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances so the kids WON'T
            slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
            things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
            generally make it through the hoop!

            St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
            and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
            that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
            monastics may have time to gather.

            Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
            late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
            or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
            delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
            two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
            make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
            are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
            and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

            Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
            conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
            is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
            standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
            failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

            Take a self-inventory and check to see if there is anyone you dislike so
            intensely that they cannot be right, no matter what they do. If there are any
            such folks, it's time for you to change, not them! I recall, alas, one pastor
            who annoyed me so much that even when he used incense (something I ordinarily
            love,) I carped to myself that he didn't do it right. With me, he just could NOT
            win. Sigh... When things get that bad, it's ourselves who need the overhaul,
            not the presumed "offender."

            St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
            shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
            about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
            or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
            should pass it on!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA

             

          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of those killed in shootings in San Francisco, California and Alexandria, Virginia. Prayers for all the injured and for their
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 14

              +PAX

               

              Prayers for the eternal rest of those killed in shootings in San Francisco, California and Alexandria, Virginia. Prayers for all the injured and for their recovery. Prayers for that the shooters may have repented before they died and prayers for the families of all.

               

              Prayers for Fr. Jamie and 43 others going on pilgrimage to the Holy Land, may they have a safe, holy and grace-filled pilgrimage and come back refreshed in body and soul.

               

              Lorene’s puppy, Kona, is doing much better, continued prayers for his recovery. Lorene thanks all for their prayers.

               

              Prayers that Brenda may be more obedient to the Holy Rule and work on being punctual, cheerful and hopeful.

               

              Prayers that people may think twice before posting unkind or harsh remarks on line, that they may be loving and merciful to others.

               

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
              grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              February 14, June 15, October 15
              Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

              The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
              recited straight through without an antiphon.
              After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
              then Psalms 117 and 62,
              the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
              148-150);
              then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
              the responsory, the verse,
              the canticle from the Gospel book,
              the litany and so the end.

              REFLECTION

              Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances so the kids WON'T
              slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
              things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
              generally make it through the hoop!

              St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
              and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
              that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
              monastics may have time to gather.

              Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
              late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
              or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
              delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
              two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
              make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
              are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
              and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

              Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
              conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
              is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
              standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
              failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

              Take a self-inventory and check to see if there is anyone you dislike so
              intensely that they cannot be right, no matter what they do. If there are any
              such folks, it's time for you to change, not them! I recall, alas, one pastor
              who annoyed me so much that even when he used incense (something I ordinarily
              love,) I carped to myself that he didn't do it right. With me, he just could NOT
              win. Sigh... When things get that bad, it's ourselves who need the overhaul,
              not the presumed "offender."

              St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
              shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
              about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
              or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
              should pass it on!

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA

               

               

               

               

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