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Holy Rule for June 10

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Gary and his wife, she is terribly over-stressed at work, for Denise, tons of hassle selling her house and moving, and for Martha, a
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 10, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Gary and his wife, she is terribly over-stressed at work, for Denise, tons of hassle selling her house and moving, and for Martha, a nomad this summer in the midst of all that confusion. Prayers, too, for Bailey, young grandson of Mike. Bailey broke his leg in two places while playing. Prayers for him AND his worried grandad. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much. JL

      [This portion seems to beg for division into two parts, so I have
      done
      that in the reflection.]

      February 9, June 10, October 10
      Chapter 7: On Humility

      The twelfth degree of humility
      is that a monk not only have humility in his heart
      but also by his very appearance make it always manifest
      to those who see him.
      That is to say that whether he is at the Work of God,
      in the oratory, in the monastery, in the garden, on the road,
      in the fields or anywhere else,
      and whether sitting, walking or standing,
      he should always have his head bowed
      and his eyes toward the ground.
      Feeling the guilt of his sins at every moment,
      he should consider himself already present at the dread Judgment
      and constantly say in his heart
      what the publican in the Gospel said
      with his eyes fixed on the earth:
      "Lord, I am a sinner and not worthy to lift up my eyes to heaven"
      (Luke 18:13; Matt. 8:8);
      and again with the Prophet:
      "I am bowed down and humbled everywhere" (Ps. 37:7,9; 118:107).

      REFLECTION

      Alcoholics Anonymous jokes about what they call "Two-steppers," that
      is, people who decide to jump right from Step 1, acknowledging their
      problem, to Step 12, carrying the message to others, with nothing in
      between! Wrong! Doesn't work that way...

      Benedictines often see a similar mistake in novices and humility.
      Bingo, they go right to the twelfth degree with nothing to build
      their external humility on but the images of Hollywood. Such
      individuals are usually well-intentioned enough, but one look at
      their demeanor will tell one that there is probably a very badly worn
      tape of "The Nun's Story" among the things they left at home! (I'm
      not knocking the film, I loved it, too! But it WAS Hollywood and it
      is not real life! Close runners-up of the same ilk would be "In This
      House of Brede" and "The Song of Bernadette" and "Come to the
      Stable.")

      Monastic life will do a lot of things but sorry, it will never make
      you Audrey Hepburn, Jennifer Jones, Diana Rigg or Loretta Young!
      People who learn that have a chance to stay, people who don't often
      leave because no monastery fits the Hollywood model, though they
      often keep looking for one that does!

      Second Section of the Reading:

      Having climbed all these steps of humility, therefore,
      the monk will presently come to that perfect love of God
      which casts out fear.
      And all those precepts
      which formerly he had not observed without fear,
      he will now begin to keep by reason of that love,
      without any effort,
      as though naturally and by habit.
      No longer will his motive be the fear of hell,
      but rather the love of Christ,
      good habit
      and delight in the virtues
      which the Lord will deign to show forth by the Holy Spirit
      in His servant now cleansed from vice and sin.

      This crucially important second part is why none of those Hollywood
      roles quite make it AND why the first section is spared from
      Jansenism. (Jansenism, you may recall, was a heresy which held that
      we could NEVER be worthy, NEVER do enough penance and so forth. In
      its sad extremes, it harked to a sort of Pelagian attitude, implying
      that we might be able to do something if we did enough harsh stuff!
      But, of course, even that would never be enough. It was a rather mean
      idea of God.)

      Humility is NOT affected, not presupposing, hence efforts to LOOK
      humble when one is not so will fall woefully short of the mark. No
      Academy Awards for this one! When they call for the envelope, it will
      be empty! Genuine humility is the most unself-conscious thing in the
      world. It produces the external demeanor without any further ado,
      because the person actually (and usually unwittingly!) BECOMES the
      truth they are striving to live. Humility shows up in the face, in
      everything, just as years of bitterness or years of love often do.
      You couldn't hide humility if you wanted to, but you don't need to,
      because the true humility is rarely even noticed and those who are
      less humble tend to discount the really humble as nobodies. In one
      sense, they are quite right! Both would agree on that!

      If one never gets to the joy and love of the end of this passage,
      there will be no reason not to look artificially rather glum over
      sins that one probably doesn't believe at heart are great anyhow.
      This is where some monastics miss the mark. They can stop at the
      perpetual gloom and dread point, without realizing the contemplative
      joy and love beyond that.

      Monasticism is true, but the Gospel is more so. Neither Jansenism nor
      perpetual gloom would play very well with Matthew, Mark, Luke or
      John. That means they wouldn't play well with St. Benedict, either,
      as his second portion surely guarantees. Love and joy and humility
      are an inseparable trio! When fear is cast out, gloom goes right
      along with it!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@... St. Mary's Monastery
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Susan, seeing a doctor to find out is she needs mitral valve surgery, a pacemaker, or new meds, and for her Mom, too. Prayers, too,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 10, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Susan, seeing a doctor to find out is she needs mitral valve surgery, a pacemaker, or new meds, and for her Mom, too. Prayers, too, for Freya, a small forehead skin lesion may need to be biopsied, her doctor referred her to a specialist to find out. Prayers for Marlene, a stroke and heart attack in the past year. Prayers for a wonderful, loving Pastor who is exploring promising new ways to relate to the flock God has given, like all flocks, sometimes a bit unruly. Prayers for all in the PanMass Challenge cycling event, which raises money for cancer research. Courage and Deo gratias for them all! Prayers for a parent agonizing over a daughter's decision to marry civilly, not in Church, for enlightenment and the will of God. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. ALl is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        [This portion seems to beg for division into two parts, so I have done
        that in the reflection.]

        February 9, June 10, October 10
        Chapter 7: On Humility

        The twelfth degree of humility
        is that a monk not only have humility in his heart
        but also by his very appearance make it always manifest
        to those who see him.
        That is to say that whether he is at the Work of God,
        in the oratory, in the monastery, in the garden, on the road,
        in the fields or anywhere else,
        and whether sitting, walking or standing,
        he should always have his head bowed
        and his eyes toward the ground.
        Feeling the guilt of his sins at every moment,
        he should consider himself already present at the dread Judgment
        and constantly say in his heart
        what the publican in the Gospel said
        with his eyes fixed on the earth:
        "Lord, I am a sinner and not worthy to lift up my eyes to heaven"
        (Luke 18:13; Matt. 8:8);
        and again with the Prophet:
        "I am bowed down and humbled everywhere" (Ps. 37:7,9; 118:107).

        REFLECTION

        Alcoholics Anonymous jokes about what they call "Two-steppers," that
        is, people who decide to jump right from Step 1, acknowledging their
        problem, to Step 12, carrying the message to others, with nothing in
        between! Wrong! Doesn't work that way...

        Benedictines often see a similar mistake in novices and humility.
        Bingo, they go right to the twelfth degree with nothing to build
        their external humility on but the images of Hollywood. Such
        individuals are usually well-intentioned enough, but one look at
        their demeanor will tell one that there is probably a very badly worn
        tape of "The Nun's Story" among the things they left at home!

        (I'm not knocking the film, I loved it, too! But it WAS Hollywood and it
        is not real life! Close runners-up of the same ilk would be "In This
        House of Brede" and "The Song of Bernadette" and "Come to the
        Stable." I loved them, too, so please don't be upset. The CLOSEST
        of the lot to truth was still not right on the mark.)

        Monastic life will do a lot of things but sorry, it will never make
        you Audrey Hepburn, Jennifer Jones, Diana Rigg or Loretta Young!
        People who learn that have a chance to stay, people who don't often
        leave because no monastery fits the Hollywood model, though they
        often keep looking for one that does!

        Second Section of the Reading:

        Having climbed all these steps of humility, therefore,
        the monk will presently come to that perfect love of God
        which casts out fear.
        And all those precepts
        which formerly he had not observed without fear,
        he will now begin to keep by reason of that love,
        without any effort,
        as though naturally and by habit.
        No longer will his motive be the fear of hell,
        but rather the love of Christ,
        good habit
        and delight in the virtues
        which the Lord will deign to show forth by the Holy Spirit
        in His servant now cleansed from vice and sin.

        This crucially important second part is why none of those Hollywood
        roles quite make it AND why the first section is spared from
        Jansenism. (Jansenism, you may recall, was a heresy which held that
        we could NEVER be worthy, NEVER do enough penance and so forth. In
        its sad extremes, it harked to a sort of Pelagian attitude, implying
        that we might be able to do something if we did enough harsh stuff!
        But, of course, even that would never be enough. It was a rather mean
        idea of God.)

        Humility is NOT affected, not presupposing, hence efforts to LOOK
        humble when one is not so will fall woefully short of the mark. No
        Academy Awards for this one! When they call for the envelope, it will
        be empty!

        Genuine humility is the most unself-conscious thing in the
        world. It produces the external demeanor without any further ado,
        because the person actually (and usually unwittingly!) BECOMES the
        truth they are striving to live. Humility shows up in the face, in
        everything, just as years of bitterness or years of love often do.

        You couldn't hide humility if you wanted to, but you don't need to,
        because the true humility is rarely even noticed and those who are
        less humble tend to discount the really humble as nobodies. In one
        sense, they are quite right! Both would agree on that!

        If one never gets to the joy and love of the end of this passage,
        there will be no reason not to look artificially rather glum over
        sins that one probably doesn't believe at heart are great anyhow.
        This is where some monastics miss the mark. They can stop at the
        perpetual gloom and dread point, without realizing the contemplative
        joy and love beyond that.

        Monasticism is true, but the Gospel is more so. Neither Jansenism nor
        perpetual gloom would play very well with Matthew, Mark, Luke or
        John. That means they wouldn't play well with St. Benedict, either,
        as his second portion surely guarantees. Love and joy and humility
        are an inseparable trio! When fear is cast out, gloom goes right
        along with it!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        jeromeleo@... St. Mary's Monastery
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Prayers for the success of our Oblate Day today, many graces for all converging on Petersham and safe journeys for them all. Prayers of Deo gratias and
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 10, 2006
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          +PAX

          Prayers for the success of our Oblate Day today, many graces for all converging on Petersham and safe journeys for them all.
          Prayers of Deo gratias and thanks for Mrs. Wynn, Sr. Mary Frances' mother, who is recovering very well from her stroke.

          Prayers, please, for Alex, 16, post-op from surgery for cancer in glands near his liver, they think they got it all, but now begins the long waiting, for his Mom and all his family, for the doctors treating him and those who treat all our folks. Prayers for Joanne, tendonitis surgery on Monday. Prayers for Ann, a chest infection which must be overcome before much needed surgery on June 26. Freddie, for whose brain tumor surgery we prayed, remains blind and can only stand with help. He is going into rehab. Continued prayers for him, his wife, Linda, and all their family. Prayers for Judith, faced with giving up a dearly loved dog who apparently turned vicious. Prayers for Shirley, still a lot of pain at the site of her lower arm fracture and in her shoulder. Prayers for Justin, grappling with identity issues, and for a troubled Christian woman who converted to Islam.

          A particularly sad prayer request for those involved in a terrible freak accident yesterday in New Hampshire. A car or SUV swerved to avoid hitting another, rolled over and in the roll-overs, struck seven members of a motorcycle club on their way to a rally. Three were killed, one of them, Steve, 40, leaves a wife and two children under 10. His cousin, Kasey, is the wife of one of our readers, Tom. Prayers for Mike, Steve's brother, who was unhurt but looked back and saw his brother and the other fatalities and injuries in the roadway. he is, understandably, shattered. Prayers for all the family of Steve and Mike, especially their Mom and Steve's wife and children. Prayers for the happy deaths and eternal rest of all the deceased. Prayers for those injured, too, conditions unknown, and for their families. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          This portion seems to beg for division into two parts, so I have done
          that in the reflection.]

          February 9, June 10, October 10
          Chapter 7: On Humility

          The twelfth degree of humility
          is that a monk not only have humility in his heart
          but also by his very appearance make it always manifest
          to those who see him.
          That is to say that whether he is at the Work of God,
          in the oratory, in the monastery, in the garden, on the road,
          in the fields or anywhere else,
          and whether sitting, walking or standing,
          he should always have his head bowed
          and his eyes toward the ground.
          Feeling the guilt of his sins at every moment,
          he should consider himself already present at the dread Judgment
          and constantly say in his heart
          what the publican in the Gospel said
          with his eyes fixed on the earth:
          "Lord, I am a sinner and not worthy to lift up my eyes to heaven"
          (Luke 18:13; Matt. 8:8);
          and again with the Prophet:
          "I am bowed down and humbled everywhere" (Ps. 37:7,9; 118:107).

          REFLECTION

          Alcoholics Anonymous jokes about what they call "Two-steppers," that
          is, people who decide to jump right from Step 1, acknowledging their
          problem, to Step 12, carrying the message to others, with nothing in
          between! Wrong! Doesn't work that way...

          Benedictines often see a similar mistake in novices and humility.
          Bingo, they go right to the twelfth degree with nothing to build
          their external humility on but the images of Hollywood. Such
          individuals are usually well-intentioned enough, but one look at
          their demeanor will tell one that there is probably a very badly worn
          tape of "The Nun's Story" among the things they left at home!

          (I'm not knocking the film, I loved it, too! But it WAS Hollywood and it
          is not real life! Close runners-up of the same ilk would be "In This
          House of Brede" and "The Song of Bernadette" and "Come to the
          Stable." I loved them, too, so please don't be upset. The CLOSEST
          of the lot to truth was still not right on the mark.)

          Monastic life will do a lot of things but sorry, it will never make
          you Audrey Hepburn, Jennifer Jones, Diana Rigg or Loretta Young!
          People who learn that have a chance to stay, people who don't often
          leave because no monastery fits the Hollywood model, though they
          often keep looking for one that does!

          Second Section of the Reading:

          Having climbed all these steps of humility, therefore,
          the monk will presently come to that perfect love of God
          which casts out fear.
          And all those precepts
          which formerly he had not observed without fear,
          he will now begin to keep by reason of that love,
          without any effort,
          as though naturally and by habit.
          No longer will his motive be the fear of hell,
          but rather the love of Christ,
          good habit
          and delight in the virtues
          which the Lord will deign to show forth by the Holy Spirit
          in His servant now cleansed from vice and sin.

          This crucially important second part is why none of those Hollywood
          roles quite make it AND why the first section is spared from
          Jansenism. (Jansenism, you may recall, was a heresy which held that
          we could NEVER be worthy, NEVER do enough penance and so forth. In
          its sad extremes, it harked to a sort of Pelagian attitude, implying
          that we might be able to do something if we did enough harsh stuff!
          But, of course, even that would never be enough. It was a rather mean
          idea of God.)

          Humility is NOT affected, not presupposing, hence efforts to LOOK
          humble when one is not so will fall woefully short of the mark. No
          Academy Awards for this one! When they call for the envelope, it will
          be empty!

          Genuine humility is the most unself-conscious thing in the
          world. It produces the external demeanor without any further ado,
          because the person actually (and usually unwittingly!) BECOMES the
          truth they are striving to live. Humility shows up in the face, in
          everything, just as years of bitterness or years of love often do.

          You couldn't hide humility if you wanted to, but you don't need to,
          because the true humility is rarely even noticed and those who are
          less humble tend to discount the really humble as nobodies. In one
          sense, they are quite right! Both would agree on that!

          If one never gets to the joy and love of the end of this passage,
          there will be no reason not to look artificially rather glum over
          sins that one probably doesn't believe at heart are great anyhow.
          This is where some monastics miss the mark. They can stop at the
          perpetual gloom and dread point, without realizing the contemplative
          joy and love beyond that.

          Monasticism is true, but the Gospel is more so. Neither Jansenism nor
          perpetual gloom would play very well with Matthew, Mark, Luke or
          John. That means they wouldn't play well with St. Benedict, either,
          as his second portion surely guarantees. Love and joy and humility
          are an inseparable trio! When fear is cast out, gloom goes right
          along with it!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          jeromeleo@... St. Mary's Monastery
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers and Deo gratias for Jeanette, received as an Oblate novice in her home. She is terminally ill, unless she can get a lung transplant, also for Fr.
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 9, 2007
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            +PAX

            Prayers and Deo gratias for Jeanette, received as an Oblate novice in her home. She is terminally ill, unless she can get a lung transplant, also for Fr. Rod, who received her, and for her husband and for her two sons, both in the military.

            Evalyn, whom we prayed ofr during her cancer surgery, has had to go back to the hosiptal due to clots and complications, prayers for her and her family, please. Prayers for a special intention for someone with serious family and financial problems. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            [This portion seems to beg for division into two parts, so I have done
            that in the reflection.]

            February 9, June 10, October 10
            Chapter 7: On Humility

            The twelfth degree of humility
            is that a monk not only have humility in his heart
            but also by his very appearance make it always manifest
            to those who see him.
            That is to say that whether he is at the Work of God,
            in the oratory, in the monastery, in the garden, on the road,
            in the fields or anywhere else,
            and whether sitting, walking or standing,
            he should always have his head bowed
            and his eyes toward the ground.
            Feeling the guilt of his sins at every moment,
            he should consider himself already present at the dread Judgment
            and constantly say in his heart
            what the publican in the Gospel said
            with his eyes fixed on the earth:
            "Lord, I am a sinner and not worthy to lift up my eyes to heaven"
            (Luke 18:13; Matt. 8:8);
            and again with the Prophet:
            "I am bowed down and humbled everywhere" (Ps. 37:7,9; 118:107).

            REFLECTION

            Alcoholics Anonymous jokes about what they call "Two-steppers," that
            is, people who decide to jump right from Step 1, acknowledging their
            problem, to Step 12, carrying the message to others, with nothing in
            between! Wrong! Doesn't work that way...

            Benedictines often see a similar mistake in novices and humility.
            Bingo, they go right to the twelfth degree with nothing to build
            their external humility on but the images of Hollywood. Such
            individuals are usually well-intentioned enough, but one look at
            their demeanor will tell one that there is probably a very badly worn
            tape of "The Nun's Story" among the things they left at home!

            (I'm not knocking the film, I loved it, too! But it WAS Hollywood and it
            is not real life! Close runners-up of the same ilk would be "In This
            House of Brede" and "The Song of Bernadette" and "Come to the
            Stable." I loved them, too, so please don't be upset. The CLOSEST
            of the lot to truth was still not right on the mark.)

            Monastic life will do a lot of things but sorry, it will never make
            you Audrey Hepburn, Jennifer Jones, Diana Rigg or Loretta Young!
            People who learn that have a chance to stay, people who don't often
            leave because no monastery fits the Hollywood model, though they
            often keep looking for one that does!

            Second Section of the Reading:

            Having climbed all these steps of humility, therefore,
            the monk will presently come to that perfect love of God
            which casts out fear.
            And all those precepts
            which formerly he had not observed without fear,
            he will now begin to keep by reason of that love,
            without any effort,
            as though naturally and by habit.
            No longer will his motive be the fear of hell,
            but rather the love of Christ,
            good habit
            and delight in the virtues
            which the Lord will deign to show forth by the Holy Spirit
            in His servant now cleansed from vice and sin.

            This crucially important second part is why none of those Hollywood
            roles quite make it AND why the first section is spared from
            Jansenism. (Jansenism, you may recall, was a heresy which held that
            we could NEVER be worthy, NEVER do enough penance and so forth. In
            its sad extremes, it harked to a sort of Pelagian attitude, implying
            that we might be able to do something if we did enough harsh stuff!
            But, of course, even that would never be enough. It was a rather mean
            idea of God.)

            Humility is NOT affected, not presupposing, hence efforts to LOOK
            humble when one is not so will fall woefully short of the mark. No
            Academy Awards for this one! When they call for the envelope, it will
            be empty!

            Genuine humility is the most unself-conscious thing in the
            world. It produces the external demeanor without any further ado,
            because the person actually (and usually unwittingly!) BECOMES the
            truth they are striving to live. Humility shows up in the face, in
            everything, just as years of bitterness or years of love often do.

            You couldn't hide humility if you wanted to, but you don't need to,
            because the true humility is rarely even noticed and those who are
            less humble tend to discount the really humble as nobodies. In one
            sense, they are quite right! Both would agree on that!

            If one never gets to the joy and love of the end of this passage,
            there will be no reason not to look artificially rather glum over
            sins that one probably doesn't believe at heart are great anyhow.
            This is where some monastics miss the mark. They can stop at the
            perpetual gloom and dread point, without realizing the contemplative
            joy and love beyond that.

            Monasticism is true, but the Gospel is more so. Neither Jansenism nor
            perpetual gloom would play very well with Matthew, Mark, Luke or
            John. That means they wouldn't play well with St. Benedict, either,
            as his second portion surely guarantees. Love and joy and humility
            are an inseparable trio! When fear is cast out, gloom goes right
            along with it!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            jeromeleo@...
            St. Mary's Monastery
            Petersham, MA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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