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Holy Rule for June 9

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Nikki, beginning her new life as an Associate of the New Monastery, with the name Sr. Mary Elizabeth. Deo gratias! Prayers, too, for
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 9, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Nikki, beginning her new life as an Associate of the New Monastery, with the name Sr. Mary Elizabeth. Deo gratias! Prayers, too, for Marlene, single Mom of four young children, who has cancer spreading from her lungs and now possibly in her kidney. She has had severe family crises in the past year and now has this to deal with. Ardent prayers here! Prayers for a woman undergoing chemo in a town where she has no family and few friends. One of those few faithful friends is one of our readers, Judith, who is trying to help. Prayers for them both! God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      February 8, June 9, October 9
      Chapter 7: On Humility

      The eleventh degree of humility
      is that when a monk speaks
      he do so gently and without laughter,
      humbly and seriously,
      in few and sensible words,
      and that he be not noisy in his speech.
      It is written,
      "A wise man is known by the fewness of his words"(Sextus,
      Enchidirion, 134 or 145).

      REFLECTION

      OK, writing as one who is 40% deaf, let me try to throw some light on
      what this step is NOT. Remember that Benedictines espouse balance and
      that balance should avoid both falsity and extremes. Benedictines are
      also human and, without the help of good formation, or maybe even
      with the encouragement of bad formation, they can fall prey to
      affectation as easily as anyone else.

      I have always been hard of hearing, so I have long noted a tendency
      by some to interpret "not noisy" as barely audible. I hardly think
      that's the case. Even talking on the phone to other OSB houses I
      sometimes pick this up: the whispered inflections that one commonly
      only hears in funeral parlors. Needless to say, that can set a very
      funereal tone, whether it meant to or not!! Just as we should not
      roar or yell when it is uncalled for, neither should we tiptoe about
      whispering when there is no need.

      There's a further problem here. This whispering can be and often is
      learned as a purely social grace, nothing more. In other words, it
      can reflect a popular behavior that has nothing to do with holiness.
      Just as it is easy to feign the symptoms of illness, it is easy to
      feign those of holiness or humility, too, with little or no reference
      at all to the condition of goodness that ought to be their root.
      Affected behavior is not humility, because it is not true. No wonder
      affectation can annoy others!

      So, for the last of my soapbox today, we don't yell, but we don't
      whisper, either, unless such adjusted speech is truly necessary.
      (Who, after all, would whisper "Fire," or "Shark,"?) We seek the
      Golden Mean of carefully weighed speech that others can hear.

      For the worst possible example of OSB sotto voce, try listening to
      one hopelessly addicted to such modulation do a reading at Mass.
      This, of all things, points to its silliness. At the very time when
      one truly OUGHT to be heard, a fake whisper robs the Liturgy of one
      of its strongest aspects, the proclamation of the Word of God. Not
      only the deaf lose out, everyone beyond a yard of so of the reader is
      clueless.

      Not what St. Benedict had in mind, folks! He made that
      clear when he insisted that only those who can edify the hearers
      should read, but we sometimes forget that.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@...
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Sr. Mary Boniface, of our Nuns dependent house in Tickfaw, Louisiana, who died yesterday, full of years and surrounded by her
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 9, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Sr. Mary Boniface, of our Nuns' dependent house in Tickfaw, Louisiana, who died yesterday, full of years and surrounded by her praying Community. Deo gratias for a good monastic end and prayers for her eternal rest.

        Thanks for your prayers for Michelle. She has died; prayers, please, for her eternal rest and for her husband and children as they mourn her. Deo gratias! Catherine had a good result on her first MRI and now awaits a second one on her brain stem, continued prayers, please. Prayers for Carol, a stubborn throat infection has affected her voice and she is a pastor who has to preach- in season and out of season, as the saying goes. She is also leading a group to Mexico, where she will have to interpret in addition to her other vocal duties, so prayers that she is able to do God's will. Prayers for Shirley, terrible knee pain and for the strength to offer her pain as prayer for others. Prayers for a couple trying to adopt, awaiting one more obstacle's removal. Prayers for Linda, a bit homesick in a new home in another state, kids grown and her husband must travel a good bit with his job. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        [When I re-read reflection this from last year, I almost didn't run it again. I thought there was a lot of anger and self in it. I thought maybe I'd edit it a bit. Then, I decided not to do that at all. Here is an excellent example of Jerome being the very kind of cranky monastic flop he often writes about: peeved and miffed that the world has briefly forgotten it revolves around him. I offer it as a counterweight to MUCH of the undeserved praise I receive. I am no less a plodder than anyone, in fact, I am more so! There is a kernel of truth in this reflection, but it gets buried under a LOT of Jerome. Sigh....]

        February 8, June 9, October 9
        Chapter 7: On Humility

        The eleventh degree of humility
        is that when a monk speaks
        he do so gently and without laughter,
        humbly and seriously,
        in few and sensible words,
        and that he be not noisy in his speech.
        It is written,
        "A wise man is known by the fewness of his words"(Sextus,
        Enchidirion, 134 or 145).

        REFLECTION

        OK, writing as one who is 40% deaf, let me try to throw some light on
        what this step is NOT. Remember that Benedictines espouse balance and
        that balance should avoid both falsity and extremes. Benedictines are
        also human and, without the help of good formation, or maybe even
        with the encouragement of bad formation, they can fall prey to
        affectation as easily as anyone else.

        I have always been hard of hearing, so I have long noted a tendency
        by some to interpret "not noisy" as barely audible. I hardly think
        that's the case. Even talking on the phone to other OSB houses I
        sometimes pick this up: the whispered inflections that one commonly
        only hears in funeral parlors. Needless to say, that can set a very
        funereal tone, whether it meant to or not!! Just as we should not
        roar or yell when it is uncalled for, neither should we tiptoe about
        whispering when there is no need.

        There's a further problem here. This whispering can be and often is
        learned as a purely social grace, nothing more. In other words, it
        can reflect a popular behavior that has nothing to do with holiness.
        Just as it is easy to feign the symptoms of illness, it is easy to
        feign those of holiness or humility, too, with little or no reference
        at all to the condition of goodness that ought to be their root.
        Affected behavior is not humility, because it is not true. No wonder
        affectation can annoy others!

        So, for the last of my soapbox today, we don't yell, but we don't
        whisper, either, unless such adjusted speech is truly necessary.
        (Who, after all, would whisper "Fire," or "Shark,"?) We seek the
        Golden Mean of carefully weighed speech that others can hear.

        For the worst possible example of OSB sotto voce, try listening to
        one hopelessly addicted to such modulation do a reading at Mass.
        This, of all things, points to its silliness. At the very time when
        one truly OUGHT to be heard, a fake whisper robs the Liturgy of one
        of its strongest aspects, the proclamation of the Word of God. Not
        only the deaf lose out, everyone beyond a yard of so of the reader is
        clueless.

        Not what St. Benedict had in mind, folks! He made that
        clear when he insisted that only those who can edify the hearers
        should read, but we sometimes forget that.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        jeromeleo@...
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Deo gratias, Frank, for whose heart surgery we prayed, is doing much better and so continued prayers and for his nurses and all those caring for him.
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 9, 2006
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          +PAX

          Deo gratias, Frank, for whose heart surgery we prayed, is doing much better and so continued prayers and for his nurses and all those caring for him. Prayers for Matthew, unfairly forced into a difficult role in a very tense family situation. Prayers for the safety of all travelling to the Episcopal Church USA General Convention, 1500 folks converging on Euclid, Ohio, for the event, and that the Holy Spirit may guide them in all their proceedings. Prayers for Frances, needing to go on oxygen and badly needing strength to quit smoking. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          [When I re-read reflection, I almost didn't run it again. I thought there
          was a lot of anger and self in it. I thought maybe I'd edit it a bit. Then,
          I decided to leave it pretty much as is.

          Here is an excellent example of Jerome being the very kind of cranky
          monastic flop he often writes about: peeved and miffed that the world has
          briefly forgotten it revolves around him. I offer it as a counterweight to all the
          undeserved praise I receive. I am no less a plodder than anyone, in fact, I
          am more so!

          There is a kernel of truth in this reflection, but it gets buried
          under a LOT of Jerome. When will I learn that those who irritate me, even
          those who wrong me are doing me great favors? They are offering me the
          trials that are the food of humility and growth. How little I use those foods!
          Sigh....]

          February 8, June 9, October 9
          Chapter 7: On Humility

          The eleventh degree of humility
          is that when a monk speaks
          he do so gently and without laughter,
          humbly and seriously,
          in few and sensible words,
          and that he be not noisy in his speech.
          It is written,
          "A wise man is known by the fewness of his words"(Sextus,
          Enchidirion, 134 or 145).

          REFLECTION

          OK, writing as one who is 40% deaf, let me try to throw some light on
          what this step is NOT. Remember that Benedictines espouse balance and
          that balance should avoid both falsity and extremes. Benedictines are
          also human and, without the help of good formation, or maybe even
          with the encouragement of bad formation, they can fall prey to
          affectation as easily as anyone else.

          I have always been hard of hearing, so I have long noted a tendency
          by some to interpret "not noisy" as barely audible. I hardly think
          that's the case. Even talking on the phone to other OSB houses I
          sometimes pick this up: the whispered inflections that one commonly
          only hears in funeral parlors. Needless to say, that can set a very
          funereal tone, whether it meant to or not!! Just as we should not
          roar or yell when it is uncalled for, neither should we tiptoe about
          whispering when there is no need.

          There's a further problem here. This whispering can be and often is
          learned as a purely social grace, nothing more. In other words, it
          can reflect a popular behavior that has nothing to do with holiness.
          Just as it is easy to feign the symptoms of illness, it is easy to
          feign those of holiness or humility, too, with little or no reference
          at all to the condition of goodness that ought to be their root.
          Affected behavior is not humility, because it is not true. No wonder
          affectation can annoy others!

          So, for the last of my soapbox today, we don't yell, but we don't
          whisper, either, unless such adjusted speech is truly necessary.
          (Who, after all, would whisper "Fire," or "Shark,"?) We seek the
          Golden Mean of carefully weighed speech that others can hear.

          For the worst possible example of OSB sotto voce, try listening to
          one hopelessly addicted to such modulation do a reading at Mass.
          This, of all things, points to its silliness. At the very time when
          one truly OUGHT to be heard, the whisper robs the Liturgy of one
          of its strongest aspects, the proclamation of the Word of God. Not
          only the deaf lose out, everyone beyond a yard of so of the reader is
          clueless.

          Not what St. Benedict had in mind, folks! He made that
          clear when he insisted that only those who can edify the hearers
          should read, but we sometimes forget that.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          jeromeleo@...
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers, please, for Randall, hospitalized after a stroke, doing well, but more tests are needed, and for his daughter, Jane, and all their family. Deo
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 8, 2007
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            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for Randall, hospitalized after a stroke, doing well, but more tests are needed, and for his daughter, Jane, and all their family. Deo gratias, Cindy's surgery went quite well, doctors had to do less than they thought they would, but she still has a long recovery, so continued prayers, please.

            T., the diabetic we prayed for whose parents had been jailed is having a setback after her parents were denied bail. Continued prayers, please, for them and for her.
            Prayers for two people in a relationship under major transition stresses, lots of huge changes, financial and otherwise, which are also affecting their health. Prayers, please for Donna, looking for a new job. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            February 8, June 9, October 9
            Chapter 7: On Humility

            The eleventh degree of humility
            is that when a monk speaks
            he do so gently and without laughter,
            humbly and seriously,
            in few and sensible words,
            and that he be not noisy in his speech.
            It is written,
            "A wise man is known by the fewness of his words"(Sextus,
            Enchidirion, 134 or 145).

            REFLECTION

            OK, writing as one who is 40% deaf, let me try to throw some light on
            what this step is NOT. Remember that Benedictines espouse balance and
            that balance should avoid both falsity and extremes. Benedictines are
            also human and, without the help of good formation, or maybe even
            with the encouragement of bad formation, they can fall prey to
            affectation as easily as anyone else.

            I have always been hard of hearing, so I have long noted a tendency
            by some to interpret "not noisy" as barely audible. I hardly think
            that's the case. Even talking on the phone to other OSB houses I
            sometimes pick this up: the whispered inflections that one commonly
            only hears in funeral parlors. Needless to say, that can set a very
            funereal tone, whether it meant to or not!! Just as we should not
            roar or yell when it is uncalled for, neither should we tiptoe about
            whispering when there is no need.

            There's a further problem here. This whispering can be and often is
            learned as a purely social grace, nothing more. In other words, it
            can reflect a popular behavior that has nothing to do with holiness.
            Just as it is easy to feign the symptoms of illness, it is easy to
            feign those of holiness or humility, too, with little or no reference
            at all to the condition of goodness that ought to be their root.
            Affected behavior is not humility, because it is not true. No wonder
            affectation can annoy others!

            So, for the last of my soapbox today, we don't yell, but we don't
            whisper, either, unless such adjusted speech is truly necessary.
            (Who, after all, would whisper "Fire," or "Shark,"?) We seek the
            Golden Mean of carefully weighed speech that others can hear.

            For the worst possible example of OSB sotto voce, try listening to
            one hopelessly addicted to such modulation do a reading at Mass.
            This, of all things, points to its silliness. At the very time when
            one truly OUGHT to be heard, the whisper robs the Liturgy of one
            of its strongest aspects, the proclamation of the Word of God. Not
            only the deaf lose out, everyone beyond a yard of so of the reader is
            clueless.

            Not what St. Benedict had in mind, folks! He made that
            clear when he insisted that only those who can edify the hearers
            should read, but we sometimes forget that.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            jeromeleo@...
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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