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Holy Rule for May 27

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for whoever infected me with HIV. I don t know who did, but it is a safe bet he has predeceased me. So much would never have been granted
    Message 1 of 4 , May 27, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for whoever infected me with HIV. I don't know who did, but it is a safe bet he has predeceased me. So much would never have been granted me had I not been infected and I am truly grateful for all of that! For one thing, I'd probably STILL be putting off monastic life, had I not been pushed a bit by the virus... God's will is best. ALL is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      January 26, May 27, September 26
      Chapter 7: On Humility

      The first degree of humility, then,
      is that a person keep the fear of God before his eyes
      and beware of ever forgetting it.
      Let him be ever mindful of all that God has commanded;
      let his thoughts constantly recur
      to the hell-fire which will burn for their sins
      those who despise God,
      and to the life everlasting which is prepared
      for those who fear Him.
      Let him keep himself at every moment from sins and vices,
      whether of the mind, the tongue, the hands, the feet,
      or the self-will,
      and check also the desires of the flesh.

      REFLECTION

      Not just the ascent to humility, but every aspect of the spiritual
      journey may be improved by meditating on the ends to which our
      actions will lead us. How many times does a parent tell a child who
      is discouraged and about to quit that the child must think of the
      reward (bike, whatever,) at the end of the efforts. "How nice it will
      be to have that!" Precisely! It is not just children whose flagging
      spirits can be bolstered by recalling the achievement to come!

      A great deal of the monastic struggle is just plain distastefully
      hard and unpleasant. Fail to lighten the load a bit by recalling the
      joys to come and you heighten the chances of failure. Heaven is real
      or our lives mean nothing at all. Trust it's reality, think about
      that reality, remind yourself of the wonders at hand.

      I write the following as one who has come as close as
      possible to believing that absolutely everyone is in heaven as the
      limits of Roman Catholic orthodoxy allow. We must believe hell
      exists. It is real, it may be empty and we must (out of charity,)
      hope to find it so, but hey, we COULD be wrong. Wouldn't be very
      nice, but it is just slightly possible that the spheres and wheels of
      eternal reward do not spin on the axis of our opinion! Nothing says
      things have to be the way we personally think they will be. Nor do
      the many visions of hell seen by saints seem to bear out this hope.
      They saw people there, alas.

      Hell is as real as heaven. Choices as real as those which lead to
      heaven can lead to hell. No one can WIN their own salvation, that has
      been done once for all by Christ, but anyone at all can LOSE their
      salvation. Choose something really dumb which would lead to hell and
      it is not a wise practice to assume one will have time to repent.
      Maybe. Maybe not. A well-timed 18 wheeler truck may just have your
      name on its front fender. We never know.

      I'll bet all of us have done things we would NOT want to do within
      seconds of death and facing God. That's what these meditations on
      hell and heaven are about. They point out forcefully to us that we
      ought not to do things that would put us in that sort of bind. It's
      not at all about figuring out whether or not hell exists, it does.
      The issue is not who is or isn't frying therein, we have no way of
      knowing. All those ideas are railroad sidings which lead to nowhere.
      Don't park your train in a dead end. It's a waste of precious time.

      Think on heaven and think on hell. If either one (and it's usually
      hell,) makes you crazy, balance your thinking. One of the surest
      signs of the devil's hands in the mud of our thoughts is loss of
      serenity. Truly divine things, even when unspeakably hard, do not
      produce the same haunting, panicky feeling that Satan can bring out
      of the tiniest things. Another key is discouragement. If your
      obsessed focus is discouraging, that's bad news.

      It is, however, crucially important to think on our ends. Ever get
      lost and remind yourself: "Well, at least I am going in the general
      direction." ? What helps there is the remembrance of the goal. "I may
      not be certain that this is the right road, but I AM going west, and
      I DO want to get to West Stockbridge, so how bad could it be?"


      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@... St. Mary's Monastery
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX A blessed feast of Saint Augustine of Canterbury, OSB, Apostle of England to all! May he bless his adopted land with abundant graces from God and may all
      Message 2 of 4 , May 27, 2005
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        +PAX

        A blessed feast of Saint Augustine of Canterbury, OSB, Apostle of England to all! May he bless his adopted land with abundant graces from God and may all the sainted Benedictines who followed him watch over and intercede for England.

        Particularly appropriate today is a request for the Hallam Diocese Cursillo being held this weekend, in Sheffield, England. Prayers, too, for John, one of our readers, a Cursillisto himself, who will be helping some folks get there. Prayers, too, that two children may be found. Dylan is 9 and Shasta is 8, their mother, her boyfriend and their older brother were all murdered and these two are missing. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        January 26, May 27, September 26
        Chapter 7: On Humility

        The first degree of humility, then,
        is that a person keep the fear of God before his eyes
        and beware of ever forgetting it.
        Let him be ever mindful of all that God has commanded;
        let his thoughts constantly recur
        to the hell-fire which will burn for their sins
        those who despise God,
        and to the life everlasting which is prepared
        for those who fear Him.
        Let him keep himself at every moment from sins and vices,
        whether of the mind, the tongue, the hands, the feet,
        or the self-will,
        and check also the desires of the flesh.

        REFLECTION

        Not just the ascent to humility, but every aspect of the spiritual
        journey may be improved by meditating on the ends to which our
        actions will lead us. How many times does a parent tell a child who
        is discouraged and about to quit that the child must think of the
        reward (bike, whatever,) at the end of the efforts. "How nice it will
        be to have that!" Precisely! It is not just children whose flagging
        spirits can be bolstered by recalling the achievement to come!

        A great deal of the monastic struggle is just plain distastefully
        hard and unpleasant. Fail to lighten the load a bit by recalling the
        joys to come and you heighten the chances of failure. Heaven is real
        or our lives mean nothing at all. Trust it's reality, think about
        that reality, remind yourself of the wonders at hand.

        I write the following as one who has come as close as
        possible to believing that absolutely everyone is in heaven as the
        limits of Roman Catholic orthodoxy allow. We must believe hell
        exists. It is real, it may be empty and we must (out of charity,)
        hope to find it so, but hey, we COULD be wrong. Wouldn't be very
        nice, but it is just slightly possible that the spheres and wheels of
        eternal reward do not spin on the axis of our opinion! Nothing says
        things have to be the way we personally think they will be. Nor do
        the many visions of hell seen by saints seem to bear out this hope.
        They saw people there, alas.

        Hell is as real as heaven. Choices as real as those which lead to
        heaven can lead to hell. No one can WIN their own salvation, that has
        been done once for all by Christ, but anyone at all can LOSE their
        salvation. Choose something really dumb which would lead to hell and
        it is not a wise practice to assume one will have time to repent.
        Maybe. Maybe not. A well-timed 18 wheeler truck may just have your
        name on its front fender. We never know.

        I'll bet all of us have done things we would NOT want to do within
        seconds of death and facing God. That's what these meditations on
        hell and heaven are about. They point out forcefully to us that we
        ought not to do things that would put us in that sort of bind. It's
        not at all about figuring out whether or not hell exists, it does.
        The issue is not who is or isn't frying therein, we have no way of
        knowing. All those ideas are railroad sidings which lead to nowhere.
        Don't park your train in a dead end. It's a waste of precious time.

        Think on heaven and think on hell. If either one (and it's usually
        hell,) makes you crazy, balance your thinking. One of the surest
        signs of the devil's hands in the mud of our thoughts is loss of
        serenity. Truly divine things, even when unspeakably hard, do not
        produce the same haunting, panicky feeling that Satan can bring out
        of the tiniest things. Another key is discouragement. If your
        obsessed focus is discouraging, that's bad news.

        It is, however, crucially important to think on our ends. Don't freak out
        on the road to heaven, because Jesus said: "I am the Way." As such,
        all the road to heaven is heaven (as St. Catherine of Siena said,)
        even when it seems otherwise, because Jesus IS that Way. On the
        other hand, rightly and wisely freak out like crazy on any path of action that
        leads away from heaven, away from Christ. That is a scary road, indeed!


        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        St. Mary's Monastery
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX A blessed feast of Saint Augustine of Canterbury, OSB, Apostle of England to all! Special prayers for Fr. Augustine of Pluscarden his patronal feast. May
        Message 3 of 4 , May 27, 2006
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          +PAX

          A blessed feast of Saint Augustine of Canterbury, OSB, Apostle of England to
          all! Special prayers for Fr. Augustine of Pluscarden his patronal feast. May
          St. Augustine bless his adopted land with abundant graces from God and may all the
          sainted Benedictines who followed him watch over and intercede for England!

          Prayers, please, for Harry, hoping the job that seems to be opening for him is God's will. Deo gratias and prayers of thanks: the young husband and father who abandoned his family for points unknown to start a whole new life somewhere else has returned home, safe and sound. Prayers for A., who in a very light-hearted sense of humour (a promising sign!) has given her cancer a name. Her surgery is delayed until some other medical problems can be tweaked and corrected. Prayers for her strength and grace and courage and continued good humour!! Prayers for one who has abandoned Christianity and converted to Islam. May she find her way home to Christ. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          January 26, May 27, September 26
          Chapter 7: On Humility

          The first degree of humility, then,
          is that a person keep the fear of God before his eyes
          and beware of ever forgetting it.
          Let him be ever mindful of all that God has commanded;
          let his thoughts constantly recur
          to the hell-fire which will burn for their sins
          those who despise God,
          and to the life everlasting which is prepared
          for those who fear Him.
          Let him keep himself at every moment from sins and vices,
          whether of the mind, the tongue, the hands, the feet,
          or the self-will,
          and check also the desires of the flesh.

          REFLECTION

          Not just the ascent to humility, but every aspect of the spiritual
          journey may be improved by meditating on the ends to which our
          actions will lead us. How many times does a parent tell a child who
          is discouraged and about to quit that the child must think of the
          reward (bike, whatever,) at the end of the efforts. "How nice it will
          be to have that!" Precisely! It is not just children whose flagging
          spirits can be bolstered by recalling the achievement to come!

          A great deal of the monastic struggle is just plain distastefully
          hard and unpleasant. Fail to lighten the load a bit by recalling the
          joys to come and you heighten the chances of failure. Heaven is real
          or our lives mean nothing at all. Trust it's reality, think about
          that reality, remind yourself of the wonders at hand.

          I write the following as one who has come as close as
          possible to believing that absolutely everyone is in heaven as the
          limits of Roman Catholic orthodoxy allow. We must believe hell
          exists. It is real, it may be empty and we must (out of charity,)
          hope to find it so, but hey, we COULD be wrong. Wouldn't be very
          nice, but it is just slightly possible that the spheres and wheels of
          eternal reward do not spin on the axis of our opinion! Nothing says
          things have to be the way we personally think they will be. Nor do
          the many visions of hell seen by saints seem to bear out this hope.
          They saw people there, alas.

          Hell is as real as heaven. Choices as real as those which lead to
          heaven can lead to hell. No one can WIN their own salvation, that has
          been done once for all by Christ, but anyone at all can LOSE their
          salvation. Choose something really dumb which would lead to hell and
          it is not a wise practice to assume one will have leisure to repent.
          Maybe. Maybe not. A well-timed 18-wheeler truck may just have your
          name on its front fender before lunch today. We never know.

          [But even in the event of that 18-wheeler, we never know what happens between
          God and the soul in the last moments, when we can no longer perceive any
          activity or change. Pray and fondly hope that all may be saved in the
          mystery of that hidden time!]

          I'll bet all of us have done things we would NOT want to do within
          seconds of death and facing God. That's what these meditations on
          hell and heaven are about. They point out forcefully to us that we
          ought not to do things that would put us in that sort of bind.

          It's not at all about figuring out whether or not hell exists, it does.
          The issue is not who is or isn't frying therein, we have no way of
          knowing. All those ideas are railroad sidings which lead to nowhere.
          Don't park your train in a dead end. It's a waste of precious time.

          Think on heaven and think on hell. If either one (and it's usually
          hell,) makes you crazy, balance your thinking. One of the surest
          signs of the devil's hands in the mud of our thoughts is loss of
          serenity. Truly divine things, even when unspeakably hard, do not
          produce the same haunting, panicky feeling that Satan can bring out
          of even the tiniest things. Another key is discouragement. If your
          obsessed focus is discouraging, that's bad news.

          It is, however, crucially important to think on our ends. Don't freak out
          on the road to heaven, because Jesus said: "I am the Way." As such,
          all the road to heaven is heaven (as St. Catherine of Siena said,)
          even when it seems otherwise, because Jesus IS that Way. On the
          other hand, rightly and wisely freak out like crazy on any path of action that
          leads away from heaven, away from Christ. That is a scary road, indeed!


          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          St. Mary's Monastery
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX A blessed Pentecost to all! Happy Birthday, dear Church! Just think, if there were no Church, none of us would ever have known one another. We have much
          Message 4 of 4 , May 26, 2007
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            +PAX

            A blessed Pentecost to all! Happy Birthday, dear Church! Just think, if there were no Church, none of us would ever have known one another. We have much to be grateful for! Prayers for Fr. Augustine of Pluscarden on his feastday and for all our Augustines! Graces and blessings in abundance!!

            Prayers please for the conversion of Jan's sister (and her
            sister's unbaptized 4 1/2 year old daughter) and for Jan's husband.
            Please pray that Jan's husband find a job soon! Please pray for the the
            repose of the soul of Jan's good friend's grandmother, who just had a massive
            stroke, and may be dying anytime. Please pray that Divine Mercy will shine
            upon her since she did not practice her faith. Prayers, too, for Anthony, who
            took his own life, for his happy death and eternal rest. Lord, help us all as
            You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never
            absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            January 26, May 27, September 26
            Chapter 7: On Humility

            The first degree of humility, then,
            is that a person keep the fear of God before his eyes
            and beware of ever forgetting it.
            Let him be ever mindful of all that God has commanded;
            let his thoughts constantly recur
            to the hell-fire which will burn for their sins
            those who despise God,
            and to the life everlasting which is prepared
            for those who fear Him.
            Let him keep himself at every moment from sins and vices,
            whether of the mind, the tongue, the hands, the feet,
            or the self-will,
            and check also the desires of the flesh.

            REFLECTION

            Not just the ascent to humility, but every aspect of the spiritual
            journey may be improved by meditating on the ends to which our
            actions will lead us. How many times does a parent tell a child who
            is discouraged and about to quit that the child must think of the
            reward (bike, whatever,) at the end of the efforts. "How nice it will
            be to have that!" Precisely! It is not just children whose flagging
            spirits can be bolstered by recalling the achievement to come!

            A great deal of the monastic struggle is just plain distastefully
            hard and unpleasant. Fail to lighten the load a bit by recalling the
            joys to come and you heighten the chances of failure. Heaven is real
            or our lives mean nothing at all. Trust it's reality, think about
            that reality, remind yourself of the wonders at hand.

            I write the following as one who has come as close as
            possible to believing that absolutely everyone is in heaven as the
            limits of Roman Catholic orthodoxy allow. We must believe hell
            exists. It is real, it may be empty and we must (out of charity,)
            hope to find it so, but hey, we COULD be wrong. Wouldn't be very
            nice, but it is just slightly possible that the spheres and wheels of
            eternal reward do not spin on the axis of our opinion! Nothing says
            things have to be the way we personally think they will be. Nor do
            the many visions of hell seen by saints seem to bear out this hope.
            They saw people there, alas.

            Hell is as real as heaven. Choices as real as those which lead to
            heaven can lead to hell. No one can WIN their own salvation, that has
            been done once for all by Christ, but anyone at all can LOSE their
            salvation. Choose something really dumb which would lead to hell and
            it is not a wise practice to assume one will have leisure to repent.
            Maybe. Maybe not. A well-timed 18-wheeler truck may just have your
            name on its front fender before lunch today. We never know.

            [But even in the event of that 18-wheeler, we never know what happens between
            God and the soul in the last moments, when we can no longer perceive any
            activity or change. Pray and fondly hope that all may be saved in the
            mystery of that hidden time!]

            I'll bet all of us have done things we would NOT want to do within
            seconds of death and facing God. That's what these meditations on
            hell and heaven are about. They point out forcefully to us that we
            ought not to do things that would put us in that sort of bind.

            It's not at all about figuring out whether or not hell exists, it does.
            The issue is not who is or isn't frying therein, we have no way of
            knowing. All those ideas are railroad sidings which lead to nowhere.
            Don't park your train in a dead end. It's a waste of precious time.

            Think on heaven and think on hell. If either one (and it's usually
            hell,) makes you crazy, balance your thinking. One of the surest
            signs of the devil's hands in the mud of our thoughts is loss of
            serenity. Truly divine things, even when unspeakably hard, do not
            produce the same haunting, panicky feeling that Satan can bring out
            of even the tiniest things. Another key is discouragement. If your
            obsessed focus is discouraging, that's bad news.

            It is, however, crucially important to think on our ends. Don't freak out
            on the road to heaven, because Jesus said: "I am the Way." As such,
            all the road to heaven is heaven (as St. Catherine of Siena said,)
            even when it seems otherwise, because Jesus IS that Way. On the
            other hand, rightly and wisely freak out like crazy on any path of action that
            leads away from heaven, away from Christ. That is a scary road, indeed!


            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            jeromeleo@...
            St. Mary's Monastery
            Petersham, MA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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