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Holy Rule for Apr. 30

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Megan, for whom we prayed, is doing much better and has been discharged from the hospital. Deo gratias! She tanks all for their prayers. Prayers, please,
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 30, 2004
      +PAX

      Megan, for whom we prayed, is doing much better and has been discharged from the hospital. Deo gratias! She tanks all for their prayers. Prayers, please, for George and his Dad, who would have been 91 today. Eternal rest to a good father! Also, for George, his wife Ann and Anastasia, their 14 year-old daughter. Anastasia is hospitalized with a serious psychiatric crisis. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      April 30, August 30, December 30
      Chapter 72: On the Good Zeal Which They Ought to Have

      Just as there is an evil zeal of bitterness
      which separates from God and leads to hell,
      so there is a good zeal
      which separates from vices and leads to God
      and to life everlasting.
      This zeal, therefore, the sisters should practice
      with the most fervent love.
      Thus they should anticipate one another in honor (Rom. 12:10);
      most patiently endure one another's infirmities,
      whether of body or of character;
      vie in paying obedience one to another --
      no one following what she considers useful for herself,
      but rather what benefits another;
      tender the charity of sisterhood chastely;
      fear God in love;
      love their Abbess with a sincere and humble charity;
      prefer nothing whatever to Christ.
      And may He bring us all together to life everlasting!

      REFLECTION

      This chapter, full of self-evident and beautiful prose should serve
      as a short rule of life, a summary of all that has gone before it.
      Live this one, and you're all right: the details from the other
      chapters will take care of themselves. Little wonder then that its
      principal points are love, obedience and humility, practiced in the
      chastity of wholeness. (Chastity, it must be recalled, is proper to
      every state in life. It is the well-ordered, balanced and whole use
      of sexuality.) Even less wonder that, to call Scripture in to witness
      here, "the greatest of these is love." Merton's one-line Holy Rule
      summary also applies: "Love is the Rule."

      The beauty here is so great that we often do not spend enough time
      looking at its converse: "the evil zeal of bitterness." What a great
      turn of phrase! Like many of us, St. Benedict seems to have known
      some whose bitterness turned into an energetic zeal, a way of life, a
      broken power line in a windy world that could strike others or
      themselves without warning.

      And "zeal" is precisely the word! People can put such frighteningly
      zealous levels of effort into self-loathing bitterness. It becomes a
      full-time job, one which requires so much energy that it's a marvel
      that they continue. Bitter anger, self-hatred, unforgiving ill-will
      towards all or most, these are viciously involuted cycles. They turn
      on the self, malignantly. They injure and alienate others to make
      one's twisted world view remain correct. They never rest, the fist is
      always clenched, the hand never open.

      Someone years ago wrote a book about suicide titled "The Savage God."
      The premise was that the illness which caused suicide was like some
      pagan deity that destroyed its adherents, an apt enough assessment.
      But evil zeal is a savage god, too. Unlike suicide which leads to
      death, this one insists on a long and horrible end in prison.

      I have known two monks with this dreadful problem, both now long
      dead. Thank heavens, they both persevered to the end and one hopes
      that was enough, because, frankly, little else could be said for
      them. They both guaranteed that their own lives were hell and pretty
      much ensured smaller doses of hell for the rest of us living with
      them. (One was so mean- I am not making this up- that the Abbot asked
      his doctors NOT to discharge him from the hospital before Christmas,
      just to give the community a break. He had been in for a pacemaker,
      by the way, and it did extend his life. Now there's a REAL test of
      the Fifth Commandment! LOL!)

      When I was much younger and living with those embittered monks, it
      was hard to look at them with much pity or calm. It isn't, now, thank
      God, and I have spent considerable time praying for both of them, as
      well as for a few of their "runners-up"! While all things are
      possible with God, the terrible thing is that this self-hatred never
      gets fixed in some people. It is a life sentence. Then, prayer is the
      only answer.

      In any situation, but perhaps worse when the sufferer is one's spouse
      or parent or child, this bitterness is a terrible cross, for both the
      sufferer and those around her. It might seem cold comfort to say that
      it can make all involved saints, but it truly is not cold comfort at
      all. Being saints is the only thing, ultimately, that matters. I hope
      by now some of my crosses of the past are praying for me, protecting
      me, by their prayers, from what once ailed them!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for the repose of George s Dad, who would have been 92 today, and for George, as he continues trying to be a good union steward on his
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 30, 2005
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for the repose of George's Dad, who would have been 92 today, and for George, as he continues trying to be a good union steward on his job. Prayers for Stephen and Thuy, badly wanting to have their first child, they recently suffered a miscarriage and a lot of hope and healing is needed for them as they continue trying. Prayers for Will, for whom we prayed about his upcoming hip replacement; he now has severe anemia and some kidney failure long before his scheduled surgery. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him. Thanks so much. JL

        April 30, August 30, December 30
        Chapter 72: On the Good Zeal Which They Ought to Have

        Just as there is an evil zeal of bitterness
        which separates from God and leads to hell,
        so there is a good zeal
        which separates from vices and leads to God
        and to life everlasting.
        This zeal, therefore, the sisters should practice
        with the most fervent love.
        Thus they should anticipate one another in honor (Rom. 12:10);
        most patiently endure one another's infirmities,
        whether of body or of character;
        vie in paying obedience one to another --
        no one following what she considers useful for herself,
        but rather what benefits another;
        tender the charity of sisterhood chastely;
        fear God in love;
        love their Abbess with a sincere and humble charity;
        prefer nothing whatever to Christ.
        And may He bring us all together to life everlasting!

        REFLECTION

        This chapter, full of self-evident and beautiful prose should serve
        as a short rule of life, a summary of all that has gone before it.
        Live this one, and you're all right: the details from the other
        chapters will take care of themselves. Little wonder then that its
        principal points are love, obedience and humility, practiced in the
        chastity of wholeness. (Chastity, it must be recalled, is proper to
        every state in life. It is the well-ordered, balanced and whole use
        of sexuality.) Even less wonder that, to call Scripture in to witness
        here, "the greatest of these is love." Merton's one-line Holy Rule
        summary also applies: "Love is the Rule."

        The beauty here is so great that we often do not spend enough time
        looking at its converse: "the evil zeal of bitterness." What a great
        turn of phrase! Like many of us, St. Benedict seems to have known
        some whose bitterness turned into an energetic zeal, a way of life, a
        broken power line in a windy world that could strike others or
        themselves without warning.

        And "zeal" is precisely the word! People can put such frighteningly
        zealous levels of effort into self-loathing bitterness. It becomes a
        full-time job, one which requires so much energy that it's a marvel
        that they continue. Bitter anger, self-hatred, unforgiving ill-will
        towards all or most, these are viciously involuted cycles. They turn
        on the self, malignantly. They injure and alienate others to make
        one's twisted world view remain correct. They never rest, the fist is
        always clenched, the hand never open.

        Someone years ago wrote a book about suicide titled "The Savage God."
        The premise was that the illness which caused suicide was like some
        pagan deity that destroyed its adherents, an apt enough assessment.
        But evil zeal is a savage god, too. Unlike suicide which leads to
        death, this one insists on a long and horrible end in prison.

        I have known two monks with this dreadful problem, both now long
        dead. Thank heavens, they both persevered to the end and one hopes
        that was enough, because, frankly, little else could be said for
        them. They both guaranteed that their own lives were hell and pretty
        much ensured smaller doses of hell for the rest of us living with
        them. (One was so mean- I am not making this up- that the Abbot asked
        his doctors NOT to discharge him from the hospital before Christmas,
        just to give the community a break. He had been in for a pacemaker,
        by the way, and it did extend his life. Now there's a REAL test of
        the Fifth Commandment! LOL!)

        When I was much younger and living with those embittered monks, it
        was hard to look at them with much pity or calm. It isn't, now, thank
        God, and I have spent considerable time praying for both of them, as
        well as for a few of their "runners-up"! While all things are
        possible with God, the terrible thing is that this self-hatred never
        gets fixed in some people. It is a life sentence. Then, prayer is the
        only answer.

        In any situation, but perhaps worse when the sufferer is one's spouse
        or parent or child, this bitterness is a terrible cross, for both the
        sufferer and those around her. It might seem cold comfort to say that
        it can make all involved saints, but it truly is not cold comfort at
        all. Being saints is the only thing, ultimately, that matters. I hope
        by now some of my crosses of the past are praying for me, protecting
        me, by their prayers, from what once ailed them!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Remarkable Providence, given today s reflection, that we have three separate prayer intentions, each connected to its own form of self-destructive evil
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 30, 2006
          +PAX

          Remarkable Providence, given today's reflection, that we have three separate prayer intentions, each connected to its own form of self-destructive evil zeal. God has a way of doing such things!

          Prayers for a parent separated from spouse and children, living alone, mentally ill and not taking meds or going to therapy, acting out violently. Prayers, too, for one arrested for a drug sale which occurred sometime in the past, before recent efforts to to get life in order, return to school, and stay clean from drugs. The prospect of a prison term may well be having effects to scare this individual back onto the right path. Prayers for the worried families of both these folks, especially the parents, spouse and children.

          Now, the best wine for last! HUGE Deo gratias: Virginia, also mentally ill and gone missing in another area of the country, has been found and graciously accepted her family's help and is now hospitalized and getting the treatment she needed. Her family expresses their profound gratitude for our prayers. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL


          April 30, August 30, December 30
          Chapter 72: On the Good Zeal Which They Ought to Have

          Just as there is an evil zeal of bitterness
          which separates from God and leads to hell,
          so there is a good zeal
          which separates from vices and leads to God
          and to life everlasting.
          This zeal, therefore, the sisters should practice
          with the most fervent love.
          Thus they should anticipate one another in honor (Rom. 12:10);
          most patiently endure one another's infirmities,
          whether of body or of character;
          vie in paying obedience one to another --
          no one following what she considers useful for herself,
          but rather what benefits another;
          tender the charity of sisterhood chastely;
          fear God in love;
          love their Abbess with a sincere and humble charity;
          prefer nothing whatever to Christ.
          And may He bring us all together to life everlasting!

          REFLECTION

          This chapter, full of self-evident and beautiful prose should serve
          as a short rule of life, a summary of all that has gone before it.
          Live this one, and you're all right: the details from the other
          chapters will take care of themselves. Little wonder then that its
          principal points are love, obedience and humility, practiced in the
          chastity of wholeness. (Chastity, it must be recalled, is proper to
          every state in life. It is the well-ordered, balanced and whole use
          of sexuality.) Even less wonder that, to call Scripture in to witness
          here, "the greatest of these is love." Merton's one-line Holy Rule
          summary also applies: "Love is the Rule."

          The beauty here is so great that we often do not spend enough time
          looking at its converse: "the evil zeal of bitterness." What a great
          turn of phrase! Like many of us, St. Benedict seems to have known
          some whose bitterness turned into an energetic zeal, a way of life, a
          broken power line in a windy world that could strike others or
          themselves without warning.

          And "zeal" is precisely the word! People can put such frighteningly
          zealous levels of effort into self-loathing bitterness. It becomes a
          full-time job, one which requires so much energy that it's a marvel
          that they continue. Bitter anger, self-hatred, unforgiving ill-will
          towards all or most, these are viciously involuted cycles. They turn
          on the self, malignantly. They injure and alienate others to make
          one's twisted world view remain correct. They never rest, the fist is
          always clenched, the hand never open.

          Someone years ago wrote a book about suicide titled "The Savage God."
          The premise was that the illness which caused suicide was like some
          pagan deity that destroyed its adherents, an apt enough assessment.
          But evil zeal is a savage god, too. Unlike suicide which leads to
          death, this one insists on a long and horrible end in prison.

          I have known two monks with this dreadful problem, both now long
          dead. Thank heavens, they persevered to the end and one hopes
          that was enough. One hopes that the tortured lives they endured were more
          than enough to save them. They both guaranteed that their own lives were
          hell and pretty much ensured smaller doses of hell for the rest of us living with
          them. As often happens, I made the foolish mistake of thinking myself and those
          they afflicted more worthy of pity than the sufferers themselves. What tragic lives
          they had, how wrong I was in my assessment!

          When I was much younger and living with those embittered monks, it
          was hard to look at them with much pity or calm, because I saw them as
          simply hateful or mean. It isn't, now, thank God. Both were disturbed and I
          was blind to the fact that their mental illness made their behavior far less a
          matter in their own control. I have spent considerable time praying for both
          of them, as well as for a few of their "runners-up"!

          While all things are possible with God, the terrible thing is that this self-hatred
          sometimes seems to never gets fixed in some people. It is a life sentence. Then,
          prayer is the only answer, but prayer can win a happy death, when no more activity
          or change is evident to us. The souls and God have their own timetable, their
          own relations which our eyes may not see, nor our ears hear.

          In any situation, but perhaps worse when the sufferer is one's spouse
          or parent or child, this bitterness is a terrible cross, for both the
          sufferer and those around her. It might seem cold comfort to say that
          it can make all involved saints, but it truly is not cold comfort at
          all. Being saints is the only thing, ultimately, that matters. I hope
          by now some of my crosses of the past are praying for me, protecting
          me, by their prayers, from what once ailed them!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Prayers, please, for a Mom worried about two of her children falling away from their Faith. Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Sr. Nancy
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 29, 2007
            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for a Mom worried about two of her children falling away
            from their Faith. Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Sr. Nancy
            Jean, who went to God after a battle with cancer, and for her family and all who
            mourn her. Prayers for God's will in a special intention matter. Continued
            prayers for baby Ethan, that a transplant donor be found, if God wills it.
            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
            grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 30, August 30, December 30
            Chapter 72: On the Good Zeal Which They Ought to Have

            Just as there is an evil zeal of bitterness
            which separates from God and leads to hell,
            so there is a good zeal
            which separates from vices and leads to God
            and to life everlasting.
            This zeal, therefore, the sisters should practice
            with the most fervent love.
            Thus they should anticipate one another in honor (Rom. 12:10);
            most patiently endure one another's infirmities,
            whether of body or of character;
            vie in paying obedience one to another --
            no one following what she considers useful for herself,
            but rather what benefits another;
            tender the charity of sisterhood chastely;
            fear God in love;
            love their Abbess with a sincere and humble charity;
            prefer nothing whatever to Christ.
            And may He bring us all together to life everlasting!

            REFLECTION

            This chapter, full of self-evident and beautiful prose should serve
            as a short rule of life, a summary of all that has gone before it.
            Live this one, and you're all right: the details from the other
            chapters will take care of themselves. Little wonder then that its
            principal points are love, obedience and humility, practiced in the
            chastity of wholeness. (Chastity, it must be recalled, is proper to
            every state in life. It is the well-ordered, balanced and whole use
            of sexuality.) Even less wonder that, to call Scripture in to witness
            here, "the greatest of these is love." Merton's one-line Holy Rule
            summary also applies: "Love is the Rule."

            The beauty here is so great that we often do not spend enough time
            looking at its converse: "the evil zeal of bitterness." What a great
            turn of phrase! Like many of us, St. Benedict seems to have known
            some whose bitterness turned into an energetic zeal, a way of life, a
            broken power line in a windy world that could strike others or
            themselves without warning.

            And "zeal" is precisely the word! People can put such frighteningly
            zealous levels of effort into self-loathing bitterness. It becomes a
            full-time job, one which requires so much energy that it's a marvel
            that they continue. Bitter anger, self-hatred, unforgiving ill-will
            towards all or most, these are viciously involuted cycles. They turn
            on the self, malignantly. They injure and alienate others to make
            one's twisted world view remain correct. They never rest, the fist is
            always clenched, the hand never open.

            Someone years ago wrote a book about suicide titled "The Savage God."
            The premise was that the illness which caused suicide was like some
            pagan deity that destroyed its adherents, an apt enough assessment.
            But evil zeal is a savage god, too. Unlike suicide which leads to
            death, this one insists on a long and horrible end in prison.

            I have known two monks with this dreadful problem, both now long
            dead. Thank heavens, they persevered to the end and one hopes
            that was enough. One hopes that the tortured lives they endured were more
            than enough to save them. They both guaranteed that their own lives were
            hell and pretty much ensured smaller doses of hell for the rest of us living
            with them. As often happens, I made the foolish mistake of thinking myself
            and those
            they afflicted more worthy of pity than the sufferers themselves. What tragic
            lives those bitter souls had and how wrong I was in my assessment!

            When I was much younger and living with those embittered monks, it
            was hard to look at them with much pity or calm, because I saw them as
            simply hateful or mean. It isn't so hard now, thank God. Both were disturbed
            and I
            was blind to the fact that their mental illness made their behavior far less
            a
            matter in their own control. I have spent considerable time praying for both
            of them, as well as for a few of their "runners-up"!

            While all things are possible with God, the terrible thing is that this
            self-hatred sometimes seems to never gets fixed in some people. It is a life
            sentence.
            Then, prayer is the only answer, but prayer can win a happy death, when no
            more
            activity or change is evident to us. The souls and God have their own
            timetable, their
            own relations which our eyes may not see, nor our ears hear.

            In any situation, but perhaps worse when the sufferer is one's spouse
            or parent or child, this bitterness is a terrible cross, for both the
            sufferer and those around her. It might seem cold comfort to say that
            it can make all involved saints, but it truly is not cold comfort at
            all. Being saints is the only thing, ultimately, that matters. I hope
            by now some of my crosses of the past are praying for me, protecting
            me, by their prayers, from what once ailed them!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA





            ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX George, for whom we prayed, has died, so prayers for his happy death, ternal rest and for all who mourn him. Prayers for the spiritual, mental and
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 29, 2008
              +PAX

              George, for whom we prayed, has died, so prayers for his happy death, ternal rest and for all who mourn him.

              Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical well-being of the following and for all who take care of them:

              John, rushed to hospital with a
              pacemaker malfunction.

              Lainie, an abusive work situation with a lot of injustice.

              Chuck had a 10 foot fall from a ladder on to concrete this morning. Lay there a long time before found. Facial fractures, arm, wrist, fear of brain injury. Rhonda is his wife, beside herself with worry.

              Bill, mesothelioma, his CT scan shows that his
              remission is over and the cancer is on the move again. He and his wife
              Peggy have to decide what course of action to take.

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
              grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              April 30, August 30, December 30
              Chapter 72: On the Good Zeal Which They Ought to Have

              Just as there is an evil zeal of bitterness
              which separates from God and leads to hell,
              so there is a good zeal
              which separates from vices and leads to God
              and to life everlasting.
              This zeal, therefore, the sisters should practice
              with the most fervent love.
              Thus they should anticipate one another in honor (Rom. 12:10);
              most patiently endure one another's infirmities,
              whether of body or of character;
              vie in paying obedience one to another --
              no one following what she considers useful for herself,
              but rather what benefits another;
              tender the charity of sisterhood chastely;
              fear God in love;
              love their Abbess with a sincere and humble charity;
              prefer nothing whatever to Christ.
              And may He bring us all together to life everlasting!

              REFLECTION

              This chapter, full of self-evident and beautiful prose should serve
              as a short rule of life, a summary of all that has gone before it.
              Live this one, and you're all right: the details from the other
              chapters will take care of themselves. Little wonder then that its
              principal points are love, obedience and humility, practiced in the
              chastity of wholeness. (Chastity, it must be recalled, is proper to
              every state in life. It is the well-ordered, balanced and whole use
              of sexuality.) Even less wonder that, to call Scripture in to witness
              here, "the greatest of these is love." Merton's one-line Holy Rule
              summary also applies: "Love is the Rule."

              The beauty here is so great that we often do not spend enough time
              looking at its converse: "the evil zeal of bitterness." What a great
              turn of phrase! Like many of us, St. Benedict seems to have known
              some whose bitterness turned into an energetic zeal, a way of life, a
              broken power line in a windy world that could strike others or
              themselves without warning.

              And "zeal" is precisely the word! People can put such frighteningly
              zealous levels of effort into self-loathing bitterness. It becomes a
              full-time job, one which requires so much energy that it's a marvel
              that they continue. Bitter anger, self-hatred, unforgiving ill-will
              towards all or most, these are viciously involuted cycles. They turn
              on the self, malignantly. They injure and alienate others to make
              one's twisted world view remain correct. They never rest, the fist is
              always clenched, the hand never open.

              Someone years ago wrote a book about suicide titled "The Savage God."
              The premise was that the illness which caused suicide was like some
              pagan deity that destroyed its adherents, an apt enough assessment.
              But evil zeal is a savage god, too. Unlike suicide which leads to
              death, this one insists on a long and horrible end in prison.

              I have known two monks with this dreadful problem, both now long
              dead. Thank heavens, they persevered to the end and one hopes
              that was enough. One hopes that the tortured lives they endured were more
              than enough to save them. They both guaranteed that their own lives were
              hell and pretty much ensured smaller doses of hell for the rest of us living
              with them. As often happens, I made the foolish mistake of thinking myself
              and those
              they afflicted more worthy of pity than the sufferers themselves. What tragic
              lives those bitter souls had and how wrong I was in my assessment!

              When I was much younger and living with those embittered monks, it
              was hard to look at them with much pity or calm, because I saw them as
              simply hateful or mean. It isn't so hard now, thank God. Both were disturbed
              and I
              was blind to the fact that their mental illness made their behavior far less
              a
              matter in their own control. I have spent considerable time praying for both
              of them, as well as for a few of their "runners-up"!

              While all things are possible with God, the terrible thing is that this
              self-hatred sometimes seems to never gets fixed in some people. It is a life
              sentence.
              Then, prayer is the only answer, but prayer can win a happy death, when no
              more
              activity or change is evident to us. The souls and God have their own
              timetable, their
              own relations which our eyes may not see, nor our ears hear.

              In any situation, but perhaps worse when the sufferer is one's spouse
              or parent or child, this bitterness is a terrible cross, for both the
              sufferer and those around her. It might seem cold comfort to say that
              it can make all involved saints, but it truly is not cold comfort at
              all. Being saints is the only thing, ultimately, that matters. I hope
              by now some of my crosses of the past are praying for me, protecting
              me, by their prayers, from what once ailed them!

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Br. Jerome Leo
              +PAX HUGE Deo gratias for us at Petersham, three great joys: Sr. Maria Isabel made her First profession today and Sisters Mary Paula and Mary Emmanuel are home
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 29, 2016
                +PAX



                HUGE Deo gratias for us at Petersham, three great joys: Sr. Maria Isabel
                made her First profession today and Sisters Mary Paula and Mary Emmanuel are
                home again with us at last. Prayers for us all, and especially our three
                Sisters. Prayers for safe travels home for Sr. Maria Isabel's family, for
                continued healing and recovery for Sr. Mary Paula, and for Sr. M. Emmanuel's
                Dad and sister and family, and for her Mom's eternal rest.



                Prayers for the eternal rest of Emmett, 20, who died of a heroin overdose,
                and for his stunned parents and family and all who mourn him.



                Edmond D's cataract surgery, for the success of which prayers were
                requested, could not take place as scheduled because the wrong lens was
                supplied to the surgeon and only discovered just before the procedure.
                Prayers, please, that this can be rescheduled as soon as possible while all
                his students are on break, so that he does not lose what little income he
                makes teaching music privately.

                Prayers for Eric-- age 30, finally willing to admit to his 10 year addiction
                to alcohol and drugs. He was just admitted to the hospital and from there
                will go into rehab. His elder brother, Edward, has been storming heaven for
                Eric's acknowledgement of his problem and for his conversion, as well as the
                conversion of his entire family.

                Prayers for Shannon, who was just diagnosed with breast cancer, and will
                undergo a lumpectomy on Wednesday, and then a round of radiation therapy.

                Prayers that Maria N, who just announced her engagement to a divorced
                non-Catholic, will seek marriage in the Church-- she has claimed until now
                to be a practicing Catholic, but was silent about her wedding plans when
                sharing the tidings with her parents. Prayers that she actually does marry
                in the Church.



                Prayers for Kerrie, who an appointment with Hematology/Oncology for the 13th
                in the afternoon. Praying for God's will.



                Prayers for Joy W., who has kidney cancer which has spread to her bones,
                legs and skull. She has borne all this bravely at age 77 on her own and now
                feels she wishes for God to take her home swiftly. Please pray she has a
                pain free and happy death and know she is loved.



                Prayers for Lucy, who is in intensive care after sustaining severe head
                injuries falling off her cycle. She has brain damage, mainly to her eyes,
                but is able to move a little. There is hope but it will be six months before
                they know the full extent of the damage.



                Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
                grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                April 30, August 30, December 30
                Chapter 72: On the Good Zeal Which They Ought to Have

                Just as there is an evil zeal of bitterness
                which separates from God and leads to hell,
                so there is a good zeal
                which separates from vices and leads to God
                and to life everlasting.
                This zeal, therefore, the sisters should practice
                with the most fervent love.
                Thus they should anticipate one another in honor (Rom. 12:10);
                most patiently endure one another's infirmities,
                whether of body or of character;
                vie in paying obedience one to another --
                no one following what she considers useful for herself,
                but rather what benefits another;
                tender the charity of sisterhood chastely;
                fear God in love;
                love their Abbess with a sincere and humble charity;
                prefer nothing whatever to Christ.
                And may He bring us all together to life everlasting!

                REFLECTION

                This chapter, full of self-evident and beautiful prose should serve
                as a short rule of life, a summary of all that has gone before it.
                Live this one, and you're all right: the details from the other
                chapters will take care of themselves. Little wonder then that its
                principal points are love, obedience and humility, practiced in the
                chastity of wholeness. (Chastity, it must be recalled, is proper to
                every state in life. It is the well-ordered, balanced and holy use
                of sexuality.) Even less wonder that, to call Scripture in to witness
                here, "the greatest of these is love." As Merton wrote, "Love is the Rule."

                The beauty here is so great that we often do not spend enough time
                looking at its converse: "the evil zeal of bitterness." What a great
                turn of phrase! Like many of us, St. Benedict seems to have known
                some whose bitterness turned into an energetic zeal, a way of life, a
                broken power line in a windy world that could strike others or
                themselves without warning.

                And "zeal" is precisely the word! People can put such frighteningly
                zealous levels of effort into self-loathing bitterness. It becomes a
                full-time job, one which requires so much energy that it's a marvel
                that they continue. Bitter anger, self-hatred, unforgiving ill-will
                towards many, these are viciously involuted cycles. They turn
                on the self, malignantly. They injure and alienate others to make
                one's twisted world view remain correct. They never rest, the fist is
                always clenched, the hand never open.

                While all things are possible with God, the terrible thing is that this
                self-hatred sometimes seems to never gets fixed in some people. It is a life
                sentence. Then, prayer is the only answer, but prayer can still win a happy
                death,
                when no more activity or change is evident to us. The souls and God have
                their own
                timetable, their own relations which our eyes may not see, nor our ears
                hear.

                In any situation, but perhaps worse when the sufferer is one's spouse
                or parent or child, this bitterness is a terrible cross, for both the
                sufferer and those around her. It might seem cold comfort to say that
                it can make all involved saints, but it truly is not cold comfort at
                all. Being saints is the only thing, ultimately, that matters. I hope
                by now some of my crosses of the past are praying for me in heaven,
                protecting
                me, by their prayers, from what once ailed them!

                Love and prayers,
                Jerome, OSB
                http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                Petersham, MA





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • russophile2002
                +PAX Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias that all were safe during the Pope’s trip to Egypt. Prayers to the Holy Spirit for Benet Hill Monastery, Colorado
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 29

                  +PAX

                   

                  Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias that all were safe during the Pope’s trip to Egypt.

                   

                  Prayers to the Holy Spirit for Benet Hill Monastery, Colorado Springs, they are electing a new Prioress.

                   

                  Prayers for Barbara P., she has Crohn’s disease.

                   

                  Prayers for John P.’s mum, 85, going downhill with dementia that has taken a turn for the worse.

                   

                  Prayers for John, undergoing surgery for colon cancer this Monday, 5/1, that the surgery be successful and any future cancer treatments arrest further spread of the disease.

                   

                  Prayers for Fr. Dunstan’s brother-in-law, Mike, recovering from surgery, and for Georgiana, Fr.’s sister, and for all their family.

                   

                  Prayers for the eternal rest of Katie, who died in drug rehab, and for her mother, Bonnie and all their family and for all who mourn her.

                   

                  Prayers for Alan, on his birthday, graces galore and many more, ad multos annos!

                   

                  Prayers for Daniel, that an argument at work will not grow into anything worse, that apologies will be accepted.

                   

                  Urgent healing prayers please for Kent, who has autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and uncontrolled diabetes. The family has been supporting him because he cannot hold down a job. They are afraid that he will die for lack of care because he already shows signs of ketoacidosis.

                   

                  Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
                  grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                  April 30, August 30, December 30
                  Chapter 72: On the Good Zeal Which They Ought to Have

                  Just as there is an evil zeal of bitterness
                  which separates from God and leads to hell,
                  so there is a good zeal
                  which separates from vices and leads to God
                  and to life everlasting.
                  This zeal, therefore, the sisters should practice
                  with the most fervent love.
                  Thus they should anticipate one another in honor (Rom. 12:10);
                  most patiently endure one another's infirmities,
                  whether of body or of character;
                  vie in paying obedience one to another --
                  no one following what she considers useful for herself,
                  but rather what benefits another;
                  tender the charity of sisterhood chastely;
                  fear God in love;
                  love their Abbess with a sincere and humble charity;
                  prefer nothing whatever to Christ.
                  And may He bring us all together to life everlasting!

                  REFLECTION

                  This chapter, full of self-evident and beautiful prose should serve
                  as a short rule of life, a summary of all that has gone before it.
                  Live this one, and you're all right: the details from the other
                  chapters will take care of themselves. Little wonder then that its
                  principal points are love, obedience and humility, practiced in the
                  chastity of wholeness. (Chastity, it must be recalled, is proper to
                  every state in life. It is the well-ordered, balanced and holy use
                  of sexuality.) Even less wonder that, to call Scripture in to witness
                  here, "the greatest of these is love." As Merton wrote, "Love is the Rule."

                  The beauty here is so great that we often do not spend enough time
                  looking at its converse: "the evil zeal of bitterness." What a great
                  turn of phrase! Like many of us, St. Benedict seems to have known
                  some whose bitterness turned into an energetic zeal, a way of life, a
                  broken power line in a windy world that could strike others or
                  themselves without warning.

                  And "zeal" is precisely the word! People can put such frighteningly
                  zealous levels of effort into self-loathing bitterness. It becomes a
                  full-time job, one which requires so much energy that it's a marvel
                  that they continue. Bitter anger, self-hatred, unforgiving ill-will
                  towards many, these are viciously involuted cycles. They turn
                  on the self, malignantly. They injure and alienate others to make
                  one's twisted world view remain correct. They never rest, the fist is
                  always clenched, the hand never open.

                  While all things are possible with God, the terrible thing is that this
                  self-hatred sometimes seems to never gets fixed in some people. It is a life
                  sentence. Then, prayer is the only answer, but prayer can still win a happy
                  death, when no more activity or change is evident to us. The souls and God have
                  their own timetable, their own relations which our eyes may not see, nor our ears
                  hear.

                  In any situation, but perhaps worse when the sufferer is one's spouse
                  or parent or child, this bitterness is a terrible cross, for both the
                  sufferer and those around her. It might seem cold comfort to say that
                  it can make all involved saints, but it truly is not cold comfort at
                  all. Being saints is the only thing, ultimately, that matters. I hope
                  by now some of my crosses of the past are praying for me in heaven,
                  protecting me, by their prayers, from what once ailed them!

                  Love and prayers,
                  Jerome, OSB
                  http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                  Petersham, MA

                   

                   


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