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Holy Rule for Apr. 24

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Anne Marie, still in ICU after her heart surgery, and for her appetite and continued recovery. Prayers, too, for her husband, Jim,
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 24, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Anne Marie, still in ICU after her heart surgery, and for her appetite and continued recovery. Prayers, too, for her husband, Jim, who must drive quite a distance to see her, then spend long hours in a waiting room between 10 minute visits.
      As Blessed Columba Marmion observed, the monastery may be the antechamber of heaven, but few like to spend time in waiting rooms! God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      April 24, August 24, December 24
      Chapter 66: On the Porter of the Monastery

      At the gate of the monastery
      let there be placed a wise old woman,
      who knows how to receive and to give a message,
      and whose maturity will prevent her from straying about.
      This porter should have a room near the gate,
      so that those who come may always find someone at hand
      to attend to their business.
      And as soon as anyone knocks or a poor person hails her,
      let her answer "Thanks be to God" or "A blessing!"
      Then let her attend to them promptly,
      with all the meekness inspired by the fear of God
      and with the warmth of charity.

      Should the porter need help,
      let her have one of the younger sisters.

      If it can be done,
      the monastery should be so established
      that all the necessary things,
      such as water, mill, garden and various workshops,
      may be within the enclosure,
      so that there is no necessity
      for the sisters to go about outside of it,
      since that is not at all profitable for their souls.

      We desire that this Rule be read often in the community,
      so that none of the sisters may excuse herself
      on the ground of ignorance.

      REFLECTION

      Modern monasteries in our Order rarely have gatehouses, let alone
      porters waiting at them. In one way, that's too bad, because one
      often sees visitors come to a monastery without a clue as to where to
      go first, or how to contact someone. On the other hand, it would
      wasteful to employ one person full-time at such an endeavor in our
      smaller communities of today, since whole days may go by in many
      places with few or none needing assistance.

      What we have today is the phone, and phone manners are how this best
      translates into modern life for both Oblates and professed. I have
      certainly known monks who have answered the phone with an attitude
      that clearly said: "You've got some nerve putting me out like this,
      disturbing me, etc." with no knowledge of the person on the other end
      of the line.

      One certainly wouldn't want to call such a monastery twice. If one
      had never called one before, it is unlikely that one would want to
      try another, to go for 2 out of 3, just in case. See the great
      responsibility we have?

      When a phone or doorbell rings, whether in a great Benedictine abbey
      or an urban Benedictine apartment, we have the opportunity to
      practice the hospitable grace that the Holy Rule requires of all.
      Dorothy Day's friend and mentor, Father Hugo, used to say that we
      love God as much as the one we love the least. That would readily
      translate here. I LOVE to see certain guests arrive, look forward to
      it as soon as I hear they are coming. Those are not the receptions on
      which I should judge my hospitality. The difficult ones are.

      The point here is that we ARE Benedictines, whether our answering
      style makes that evident or not. I might not like to think so, but
      the anonymity of just saying "Hello," without my name or title does
      not entitle me to be harsh or gruff or rude. All of us are bound by
      something Benedictine within us to be kind and gracious to all who
      call or visit.

      Someone who calls the guesthouse- or an Oblate's home- for the first
      time can be driven away or attracted by the way they are dealt with
      on the phone. To risk alienating someone because of our own moods
      might mean that we cheat someone out of a spiritual friendship they
      sorely need. I can't tell you how many people who just called us out
      of nowhere in the last seven years have become real members of our
      family, greatly beneficial to themselves and to us. Anyone of those
      first experiences could have been irreparably soured by a cranky
      phone manner. Look at what all of us would have lost had that
      happened.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Tis the feast of St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, patron of my late Abbot Fidelis Dunlap of St. Leo, who was also my novicemaster. Say a prayer for him,
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 24, 2005
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        +PAX

        'Tis the feast of St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, patron of my late Abbot Fidelis Dunlap of St. Leo, who was also my novicemaster. Say a prayer for him, please. Much of what I can give to you came to me through him!

        Prayers of thanksgiving and Deo gratias for Julie and her newborn son, all went well, and for Paul, her Dad, and all their family. Prayers for Cheryl, severe back pain, and for another Julie, a grandmother who apparently snapped and robbed her hairdresser at gunpoint, then shot out the rear window of the woman's car. She has no criminal history and a mental health evaluation is underway. Prayers, too, for her children and grandchildren, as well as for the startled woman (who knew her well,) whom she robbed. A very strange mess all around. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him. Thanks so much. JL

        April 24, August 24, December 24
        Chapter 66: On the Porter of the Monastery

        At the gate of the monastery
        let there be placed a wise old woman,
        who knows how to receive and to give a message,
        and whose maturity will prevent her from straying about.
        This porter should have a room near the gate,
        so that those who come may always find someone at hand
        to attend to their business.
        And as soon as anyone knocks or a poor person hails her,
        let her answer "Thanks be to God" or "A blessing!"
        Then let her attend to them promptly,
        with all the meekness inspired by the fear of God
        and with the warmth of charity.

        Should the porter need help,
        let her have one of the younger sisters.

        If it can be done,
        the monastery should be so established
        that all the necessary things,
        such as water, mill, garden and various workshops,
        may be within the enclosure,
        so that there is no necessity
        for the sisters to go about outside of it,
        since that is not at all profitable for their souls.

        We desire that this Rule be read often in the community,
        so that none of the sisters may excuse herself
        on the ground of ignorance.

        REFLECTION

        Modern monasteries in our Order rarely have gatehouses, let alone
        porters waiting at them. In one way, that's too bad, because one
        often sees visitors come to a monastery without a clue as to where to
        go first, or how to contact someone. On the other hand, it would
        wasteful to employ one person full-time at such an endeavor in our
        smaller communities of today, since whole days may go by in many
        places with few or none needing assistance.

        What we have today is the phone, and phone manners are how this best
        translates into modern life for both Oblates and professed. I have
        certainly known monks who have answered the phone with an attitude
        that clearly said: "You've got some nerve putting me out like this,
        disturbing me, etc." with no knowledge of the person on the other end
        of the line.

        One certainly wouldn't want to call such a monastery twice. If one
        had never called one before, it is unlikely that one would want to
        try another, to go for 2 out of 3, just in case. See the great
        responsibility we have?

        When a phone or doorbell rings, whether in a great Benedictine abbey
        or an urban Benedictine apartment, we have the opportunity to
        practice the hospitable grace that the Holy Rule requires of all.
        Dorothy Day's friend and mentor, Father Hugo, used to say that we
        love God as much as the one we love the least. That would readily
        translate here. I LOVE to see certain guests arrive, look forward to
        it as soon as I hear they are coming. Those are not the receptions on
        which I should judge my hospitality. The difficult ones are.

        The point here is that we ARE Benedictines, whether our answering
        style makes that evident or not. I might not like to think so, but
        the anonymity of just saying "Hello," without my name or title does
        not entitle me to be harsh or gruff or rude. All of us are bound by
        something Benedictine within us to be kind and gracious to all who
        call or visit.

        Someone who calls the guesthouse- or an Oblate's home- for the first
        time can be driven away or attracted by the way they are dealt with
        on the phone. To risk alienating someone because of our own moods
        might mean that we cheat someone out of a spiritual friendship they
        sorely need. I can't tell you how many people who just called us out
        of nowhere in the last eight years have become real members of our
        family, greatly beneficial to themselves and to us. Anyone of those
        first experiences could have been irreparably soured by a cranky
        phone manner. Look at what all of us would have lost had that
        happened.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Tis the feast of St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, patron of my late Abbot Fidelis Dunlap of St. Leo, who was also my novicemaster. Say a prayer for him,
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 24, 2006
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          +PAX

          'Tis the feast of St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, patron of my late Abbot Fidelis
          Dunlap of St. Leo, who was also my novicemaster. Say a prayer for him, please.
          Much of what I can give to you came to me through him!

          Deo gratias! Aidan, for whom we prayed in February has had a wonderful course of recovery from his surgery and thanks all for their prayers, prayer for his continued healing, please! Deo gratias, and prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Helen, who has gone to God, for Mother Claudia, her daughter, and for all her family and those who mourn her. Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Fr. Paul Edwards, for his family and all who mourn him. Prayers for Bill, badly in need of a kidney transplant, but suspected infection and adhesions in his abdomen are holding off that surgery, prayers for him and his very worried family. Prayers for one who is depressed and feeling listless during convalescence. Prayers for two priests on chemotherapy. Prayers for someone with cancer that may have spread. Prayers for Virginia, 80's, lump on her breast, she survived breast cancer some years earlier, but she is frail, and for all her worried family. Prayers for all the doctors who treat us: may God guide their hands and hearts.Prayers for Shirl, he has another malignancy and faces a third surgery with 6 weeks of chemo, for his wife, Marlyn, and all his family. Lord, help us as you know and will God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him. Thanks so much! JL

          April 24, August 24, December 24
          Chapter 66: On the Porter of the Monastery

          At the gate of the monastery
          let there be placed a wise old woman,
          who knows how to receive and to give a message,
          and whose maturity will prevent her from straying about.
          This porter should have a room near the gate,
          so that those who come may always find someone at hand
          to attend to their business.
          And as soon as anyone knocks or a poor person hails her,
          let her answer "Thanks be to God" or "A blessing!"
          Then let her attend to them promptly,
          with all the meekness inspired by the fear of God
          and with the warmth of charity.

          Should the porter need help,
          let her have one of the younger sisters.

          If it can be done,
          the monastery should be so established
          that all the necessary things,
          such as water, mill, garden and various workshops,
          may be within the enclosure,
          so that there is no necessity
          for the sisters to go about outside of it,
          since that is not at all profitable for their souls.

          We desire that this Rule be read often in the community,
          so that none of the sisters may excuse herself
          on the ground of ignorance.

          REFLECTION

          Modern monasteries in our Order rarely have gatehouses, let alone
          porters waiting at them. In one way, that's too bad, because one
          often sees visitors come to a monastery without a clue as to where to
          go first, or how to contact someone. On the other hand, it would
          wasteful to employ one person full-time at such an endeavor in our
          smaller communities of today, since whole days may go by in many
          places with few or none needing assistance.

          What we have today is the phone, and phone manners are how this best
          translates into modern life for both Oblates and professed. It is a terrible
          thing whenever monks have answered the phone with an attitude
          that clearly said: "You've got some nerve putting me out like this,
          disturbing me, etc." with little concern for the person on the other end
          of the line.

          One certainly wouldn't want to call such a monastery twice. If one
          had never called one before, it is unlikely that one would want to
          try another, to go for 2 out of 3, just in case. See the great
          responsibility we have?

          When a phone or doorbell rings, whether in a great Benedictine abbey
          or an urban Benedictine apartment, we have the opportunity to
          practice the hospitable grace that the Holy Rule requires of all.
          Dorothy Day's friend and mentor, Father Hugo, used to say that we
          love God as much as the one we love the least. That would readily
          translate here. I LOVE to see certain guests arrive, look forward to
          it as soon as I hear they are coming. Those are not the receptions on
          which I should judge my hospitality. The difficult ones are.

          The point here is that we ARE Benedictines, whether our answering
          style makes that evident or not. I might not like to think so, but
          the anonymity of just saying "Hello," without my name or title does
          not entitle me to be harsh or gruff or rude. All of us are bound by
          something Benedictine within us to be kind and gracious to all who
          call or visit.

          Someone who calls the guesthouse- or an Oblate's home- for the first
          time can be driven away or attracted by the way they are dealt with
          on the phone. To risk alienating someone because of our own moods
          might mean that we cheat someone out of a spiritual friendship they
          sorely need. I can't tell you how many people who just called us out
          of nowhere in the last nine years have become real members of our
          family, greatly beneficial to themselves and to us. Anyone of those
          first experiences could have been irreparably soured by a cranky
          phone manner. Look at what all of us would have lost had that
          happened.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Abbot Fidelis of St. Leo (+1992) Today is his patron s feast day, St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen. He taught me
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 23, 2007
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            +PAX

            Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Abbot Fidelis of St. Leo
            (+1992) Today is his patron's feast day, St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen. He taught
            me much of what I pass on to you. May he rest in peace!

            Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Peter, on his anniversary of
            death, and for his son, Tom and all his family. Prayers for a woman in ICU,
            critically ill with lungs deteriorating and on a ventilator, also for Jose,
            her distraught husband, and all their family. Prayers for Maria, on her
            birthday.

            Prayers, please, for Fr. Virgil, seriously ill from an infection and in
            intensive care. He is responding to the medication they're giving him but has a
            long way to go to recover. Prayers, please, for Alex and Ian and their son ,
            Tyson, born 12th April. He has already been hospitalized once for jaundice
            and is now losing weight with the threat of being hospitalized a second time.
            Please pray for the anxious parents and the health and well-being of their
            little one, and the anxious grandparents who are unable to be with them until
            May 6th. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
            mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 24, August 24, December 24
            Chapter 66: On the Porter of the Monastery

            At the gate of the monastery
            let there be placed a wise old woman,
            who knows how to receive and to give a message,
            and whose maturity will prevent her from straying about.
            This porter should have a room near the gate,
            so that those who come may always find someone at hand
            to attend to their business.
            And as soon as anyone knocks or a poor person hails her,
            let her answer "Thanks be to God" or "A blessing!"
            Then let her attend to them promptly,
            with all the meekness inspired by the fear of God
            and with the warmth of charity.

            Should the porter need help,
            let her have one of the younger sisters.

            If it can be done,
            the monastery should be so established
            that all the necessary things,
            such as water, mill, garden and various workshops,
            may be within the enclosure,
            so that there is no necessity
            for the sisters to go about outside of it,
            since that is not at all profitable for their souls.

            We desire that this Rule be read often in the community,
            so that none of the sisters may excuse herself
            on the ground of ignorance.

            REFLECTION

            Modern monasteries in our Order rarely have gatehouses, let alone
            porters waiting at them. In one way, that's too bad, because one
            often sees visitors come to a monastery without a clue as to where to
            go first, or how to contact someone. On the other hand, it would
            wasteful to employ one person full-time at such an endeavor in our
            smaller communities of today, since whole days may go by in many
            places with few or none needing assistance.

            What we have today is the phone, and phone manners are how this best
            translates into modern life for both Oblates and professed. It is a terrible
            thing whenever monks have answered the phone with an attitude
            that clearly said: "You've got some nerve putting me out like this,
            disturbing me, etc." with little concern for the person on the other end
            of the line.

            One certainly wouldn't want to call such a monastery twice. If one
            had never called one before, it is unlikely that one would want to
            try another, to go for 2 out of 3, just in case. See the great
            responsibility we have?

            When a phone or doorbell rings, whether in a great Benedictine abbey
            or an urban Benedictine apartment, we have the opportunity to
            practice the hospitable grace that the Holy Rule requires of all.
            Dorothy Day's friend and mentor, Father Hugo, used to say that we
            love God as much as the one we love the least. That would readily
            translate here. I LOVE to see certain guests arrive, look forward to
            it as soon as I hear they are coming. Those are not the receptions on
            which I should judge my hospitality. The difficult ones are.

            The point here is that we ARE Benedictines, whether our answering
            style makes that evident or not. I might not like to think so, but
            the anonymity of just saying "Hello," without my name or title does
            not entitle me to be harsh or gruff or rude. All of us are bound by
            something Benedictine within us to be kind and gracious to all who
            call or visit.

            Someone who calls the guesthouse- or an Oblate's home- for the first
            time can be driven away or attracted by the way they are dealt with
            on the phone. To risk alienating someone because of our own moods
            might mean that we cheat someone out of a spiritual friendship they
            sorely need. I can't tell you how many people who just called us out
            of nowhere in the last nine years have become real members of our
            family, greatly beneficial to themselves and to us. Anyone of those
            first experiences could have been irreparably soured by a cranky
            phone manner. Look at what all of us would have lost had that
            happened.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA






            ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Abbot Fidelis of St. Leo (+1992) Today is his patron s feast day, St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen. He taught me
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 23, 2008
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              +PAX

              Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Abbot Fidelis of St. Leo
              (+1992) Today is his patron's feast day, St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen. He taught
              me much of what I pass on to you. May he rest in peace!

              Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physcial well-being of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

              Suzie, traumatic brain injury 5 years ago, not uncontrollable seizures meds can't help.

              Clarice and her grandson, Benjamin, 20, thrown out of the house by his father.

              Terry, apparently an allergic reaction to a blood tranfusion after dialysis, but docs uncertain and for his worried wife.

              Jerry, whose bone marrow transplant we prayed for has been discharged. Deo gratias!

              Lee, very near death, 55, baptized Catholic but has no faith and never practiced. For a miracle of a happy death accepting Jesus and His Divine Mercy.

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
              mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              April 24, August 24, December 24
              Chapter 66: On the Porter of the Monastery

              At the gate of the monastery
              let there be placed a wise old woman,
              who knows how to receive and to give a message,
              and whose maturity will prevent her from straying about.
              This porter should have a room near the gate,
              so that those who come may always find someone at hand
              to attend to their business.
              And as soon as anyone knocks or a poor person hails her,
              let her answer "Thanks be to God" or "A blessing!"
              Then let her attend to them promptly,
              with all the meekness inspired by the fear of God
              and with the warmth of charity.

              Should the porter need help,
              let her have one of the younger sisters.

              If it can be done,
              the monastery should be so established
              that all the necessary things,
              such as water, mill, garden and various workshops,
              may be within the enclosure,
              so that there is no necessity
              for the sisters to go about outside of it,
              since that is not at all profitable for their souls.

              We desire that this Rule be read often in the community,
              so that none of the sisters may excuse herself
              on the ground of ignorance.

              REFLECTION

              Modern monasteries in our Order rarely have gatehouses, let alone
              porters waiting at them. In one way, that's too bad, because one
              often sees visitors come to a monastery without a clue as to where to
              go first, or how to contact someone. On the other hand, it would
              wasteful to employ one person full-time at such an endeavor in our
              smaller communities of today, since whole days may go by in many
              places with few or none needing assistance.

              What we have today is the phone, and phone manners are how this best
              translates into modern life for both Oblates and professed. It is a terrible
              thing whenever monks have answered the phone with an attitude
              that clearly said: "You've got some nerve putting me out like this,
              disturbing me, etc." with little concern for the person on the other end
              of the line.

              One certainly wouldn't want to call such a monastery twice. If one
              had never called one before, it is unlikely that one would want to
              try another, to go for 2 out of 3, just in case. See the great
              responsibility we have?

              When a phone or doorbell rings, whether in a great Benedictine abbey
              or an urban Benedictine apartment, we have the opportunity to
              practice the hospitable grace that the Holy Rule requires of all.
              Dorothy Day's friend and mentor, Father Hugo, used to say that we
              love God as much as the one we love the least. That would readily
              translate here. I LOVE to see certain guests arrive, look forward to
              it as soon as I hear they are coming. Those are not the receptions on
              which I should judge my hospitality. The difficult ones are.

              The point here is that we ARE Benedictines, whether our answering
              style makes that evident or not. I might not like to think so, but
              the anonymity of just saying "Hello," without my name or title does
              not entitle me to be harsh or gruff or rude. All of us are bound by
              something Benedictine within us to be kind and gracious to all who
              call or visit.

              Someone who calls the guesthouse- or an Oblate's home- for the first
              time can be driven away or attracted by the way they are dealt with
              on the phone. To risk alienating someone because of our own moods
              might mean that we cheat someone out of a spiritual friendship they
              sorely need. I can't tell you how many people who just called us out
              of nowhere in the last nine years have become real members of our
              family, greatly beneficial to themselves and to us. Anyone of those
              first experiences could have been irreparably soured by a cranky
              phone manner. Look at what all of us would have lost had that
              happened.

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA








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