Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Holy Rule for Apr. 19

Expand Messages
  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Celine. She has lost her husband, two in-laws and her twin sister to death, all in just a few months. God s will is best. All is
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 19, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Celine. She has lost her husband, two in-laws and her twin sister to death, all in just a few months. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      April 19, August 19, December 19
      Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community
      The juniors, therefore, should honor their seniors,
      and the seniors love their juniors.

      In the very manner of address,
      let no one call another by the mere name;
      but let the seniors call their juniors Brothers,
      and the juniors call their seniors Fathers,
      by which is conveyed the reverence due to a father.
      But the Abbot,
      since he is believed to represent Christ,
      shall be called Lord and Abbot,
      not for any pretensions of his own
      but out of honor and love for Christ.
      Let the Abbot himself reflect on this,
      and show himself worthy of such an honor.

      And wherever the brethren meet one another
      the junior shall ask the senior for his blessing.
      When a senior passes by,
      a junior shall rise and give him a place to sit,
      nor shall the junior presume to sit with him
      unless his senior bid him,
      that it may be as was written,
      "In honor anticipating one another."

      Boys, both small and adolescent,
      shall keep strictly to their rank in oratory and at table.
      But outside of that, wherever they may be,
      let them be under supervision and discipline,
      until they come to the age of discretion.

      REFLECTION

      Abbot Fidelis, my late novicemaster, used to always say that
      Benedictines were "gentlemen monks." At that time, the phrase annoyed
      me a good bit, though I never said so. It seemed to have a ring of
      faint middle-class respectability about it, not a little bourgeois,
      as if we were monks who were "the right sort of people."

      It would still annoy me today if, one meant by that phrase nothing
      more than all those rather hollow social niceties. Not that there's
      anything wrong as such with social niceties, just that I have grown
      up in a country where courtesy, "civil" religion and the like had
      precious little to do with faith itself. Such things, though
      indubitably polite, always seemed to me to be the basically
      disconnected veneer of an often mediocre faith.

      Living among monastics will teach one (hopefully!) by osmosis that
      many of the common courtesies which have become decidedly UNcommon in
      the world are the order of the day here. We get so immersed in that
      that often it is hard to even think of what they are, we just do
      them. The best example I can come up with right now is that there is
      FAR more restraint here against interrupting another's conversation
      here than in the world at large. We do it sometimes, I do it too
      much, but basically we do NOT "butt in."

      There are many other little things, rising when a superior enters,
      not sitting until the superior does in chapter, etc. These in
      themselves may seem empty at first, but when linked to the charity of
      Christ and His Divine Mercy, they become very real gestures of love.
      The fact that we don't think of them much after a while in no way
      diminishes the Treasure that motivates them, Christ Himself.

      So, yes, my dear Abbot Fidelis, we ARE gentlemen monks (and gentle
      monastics period!) No, we are not like some terribly well-off and
      proper alumni mixer at Yale, or Cambridge, or Harvard or Oxford. But
      we ARE gentle and we are so because of Him Whom we seek and have come
      to love.

      Love and prayers,

      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Julie, ready to deliver her baby any day now, for her baby, her Dad, Grandad Paul, and all their family. For Tommy, a fireman who
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 19, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Julie, ready to deliver her baby any day now, for her baby, her Dad, Grandad Paul, and all their family. For Tommy, a fireman who fell off a crumbling fire escape and was seriously injured, including a collapsed lung, for his sister, Josie and all his family. Prayers for George, hoping to do his best as union steward on a job. Continued prayers for the Holy Spirit to guide the Cardinal electors. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 19, August 19, December 19
        Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community
        The juniors, therefore, should honor their seniors,
        and the seniors love their juniors.

        In the very manner of address,
        let no one call another by the mere name;
        but let the seniors call their juniors Brothers,
        and the juniors call their seniors Fathers,
        by which is conveyed the reverence due to a father.
        But the Abbot,
        since he is believed to represent Christ,
        shall be called Lord and Abbot,
        not for any pretensions of his own
        but out of honor and love for Christ.
        Let the Abbot himself reflect on this,
        and show himself worthy of such an honor.

        And wherever the brethren meet one another
        the junior shall ask the senior for his blessing.
        When a senior passes by,
        a junior shall rise and give him a place to sit,
        nor shall the junior presume to sit with him
        unless his senior bid him,
        that it may be as was written,
        "In honor anticipating one another."

        Boys, both small and adolescent,
        shall keep strictly to their rank in oratory and at table.
        But outside of that, wherever they may be,
        let them be under supervision and discipline,
        until they come to the age of discretion.

        REFLECTION

        Abbot Fidelis, my late novicemaster, used to always say that
        Benedictines were "gentlemen monks." At that time, the phrase annoyed
        me a good bit, though I never said so. It seemed to have a ring of
        faint middle-class respectability about it, not a little bourgeois,
        as if we were monks who were "the right sort of people."

        It would still annoy me today if, one meant by that phrase nothing
        more than all those rather hollow social niceties. Not that there's
        anything wrong as such with social niceties, just that I have grown
        up in a country where courtesy, "civil" religion and the like had
        precious little to do with faith itself. Such things, though
        indubitably polite, always seemed to me to be the basically
        disconnected veneer of an often mediocre faith.

        Living among monastics will teach one (hopefully!) by osmosis that
        many of the common courtesies which have become decidedly UNcommon in
        the world are the order of the day here. We get so immersed in that
        that often it is hard to even think of what they are, we just do
        them. The best example I can come up with right now is that there is
        FAR more restraint here against interrupting another's conversation
        here than in the world at large. We do it sometimes, I do it too
        much, but basically we do NOT "butt in."

        There are many other little things, rising when a superior enters,
        not sitting until the superior does in chapter, etc. These in
        themselves may seem empty at first, but when linked to the charity of
        Christ and His Divine Mercy, they become very real gestures of love.
        The fact that we don't think of them much after a while in no way
        diminishes the Treasure that motivates them, Christ Himself.

        So, yes, my dear Abbot Fidelis, we ARE gentlemen monks (and gentle
        monastics period!) No, we are not like some terribly well-off and
        properly stuffy social elite. But we ARE gentle and we are so because of
        Him Whom we seek and have come to love more and more as we better
        see His ineffable mercy.

        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Prayers, please, for Matt, trying to discern where and how God wants Him to serve Him, for Chris, newly diagnosed with HIV and for Philip, also HIV+, [not
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 19, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for Matt, trying to discern where and how God wants Him to serve Him, for Chris, newly diagnosed with HIV and for Philip, also HIV+, [not praying for myself here, even though it is my baptismal name, this is another Philip.] Prayers for newborn twins, Autumn and Charlize, for their parents and their life as a family, for God's grace and will for them all! Prayers for J., newly diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal memory of Paul, who went to God yesterday morning, for his wife, his daughter, Norma Jean, his godson, Fr. Robert and all who mourn him.

          Prayers for Pat, emphysema, and for Tony, on waiting list for a school he really wants to attend. Prayers for the happy death of Purvis and Quadrevion, the missing young boys we prayed for, they were found dead, apparently accidental drowning. Prayer for their families and all who mourn them. Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Harold, and for his sister, Ruth, who cannot make it to his funeral, and all his family and those who mourn him. Prayers for Anastasia, court date soon, and for her Mom and Dad, who have been through so much with her.

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Sal, 60, who died after a 12 year illness and a lot of suffering, for his wife, Sheila, who predeceased him and for their son and daughter Shawn and Lisa, and all who mourn them. Prayers for Rev. Judith's Mom, who suffered a mild stroke. Prayers for Lisa, a practicing Wiccan, who just had a conversion experience to Catholicism. May it last and strengthen!! She is likely to be heavily assailed by the Evil One, so ardent prayers, especially to Sts. Michael Benedict, who are strong defenders against Satan. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 19, August 19, December 19
          Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community
          The juniors, therefore, should honor their seniors,
          and the seniors love their juniors.

          In the very manner of address,
          let no one call another by the mere name;
          but let the seniors call their juniors Brothers,
          and the juniors call their seniors Fathers,
          by which is conveyed the reverence due to a father.
          But the Abbot,
          since he is believed to represent Christ,
          shall be called Lord and Abbot,
          not for any pretensions of his own
          but out of honor and love for Christ.
          Let the Abbot himself reflect on this,
          and show himself worthy of such an honor.

          And wherever the brethren meet one another
          the junior shall ask the senior for his blessing.
          When a senior passes by,
          a junior shall rise and give him a place to sit,
          nor shall the junior presume to sit with him
          unless his senior bid him,
          that it may be as was written,
          "In honor anticipating one another."

          Boys, both small and adolescent,
          shall keep strictly to their rank in oratory and at table.
          But outside of that, wherever they may be,
          let them be under supervision and discipline,
          until they come to the age of discretion.

          REFLECTION

          Abbot Fidelis, my late novicemaster, used to always say that
          Benedictines were "gentlemen monks." At that time, the phrase annoyed
          me a good bit, though I never said so. It seemed to have a ring of
          faint middle-class respectability about it, not a little bourgeois,
          as if we were monks who were "the right sort of people."

          It would still annoy me today if, one meant by that phrase nothing
          more than all those rather hollow social niceties. Not that there's
          anything wrong as such with social niceties, just that I have grown
          up in a country where courtesy, "civil" religion and the like often had
          precious little to do with faith itself. Such things, though
          indubitably polite, always seemed to me to be the basically
          disconnected veneer of an often mediocre faith. They can be the
          exercise of a genuine charity and animated faith, but sometimes
          they are not.

          Living among monastics will teach one (hopefully!) by osmosis that
          many of the common courtesies which have become decidedly UNcommon in
          the world are the order of the day here. We get so immersed in that
          that often it is hard to even think of what they are, we just do
          them. The best example I can come up with right now is that there is
          FAR more restraint here against interrupting another's conversation
          here than in the world at large. We do it sometimes, I do it too
          much, but basically we do NOT "butt in."

          There are many other little things, rising when a superior enters,
          not sitting until the superior does in chapter, etc. These in
          themselves may seem empty at first, but when linked to the charity of
          Christ and His Divine Mercy, they become very real gestures of love.
          The fact that we don't think of them much after a while in no way
          diminishes the Treasure that motivates them, Christ Himself.

          So, yes, my dear Abbot Fidelis, we ARE gentlemen monks (and gentle
          monastics period!) No, we are not like some terribly well-off and
          properly stuffy social elite. But we ARE gentle and we are so because of
          Him Whom we seek and have come to love more and more as we better
          see His ineffable mercy.

          Love and prayers,

          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Sr. Mary Paula says that Kyle would love to receive messages of congratulations from those who prayed for his exam success. I especially ask some of you
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 18, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            +PAX

            Sr. Mary Paula says that Kyle would love to receive messages of
            congratulations from those who prayed for his exam success. I especially ask some of you
            overseas to drop him a line, he will be so thrilled to know people all over
            the world were praying. His e mail is (without the spaces that AOL annoying
            puts before and after...) _glkwenzel@..._
            (mailto:glkwenzel@...)

            Prayers for Ann's Mom, on her 83rd birthday. Deo gratias and ad multos
            annos, many years! Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Audrey Santos,
            who had been in a coma for about 18 years, gone to God a few days ago at 23,
            also for her family and all who mourn her. She was a well-known figure in our
            Diocese of Worcester, MA. Prayers, please, for Mayor Iccho Ito of Nagasaki,
            Japan. He was assassinated by a Japanese gangster, and was a wonderful, peace
            loving man. For his happy death and eternal rest and for his family and all
            who mourn him, as well as for his assassin.

            Both Bob, our liver transplant and Caitlyn, the child we have been praying
            for, have been discharged from the hospital. Deo gratias and continued prayers,
            especially for a deep faith for Bob and Petrina, his wife.Deo gratias, for
            Leah, 10, our other liver transplant, she had her last tube removed and has
            gone to Disneyland, doing very, very well! Her family is so grateful for our
            prayers.

            Prayers, please, for Jual, 29, just diagnosed with breast cancer, she is
            also 20 weeks pregnant. Jual has a very very difficult time ahead of her so
            prayers for Jual, her husband, Alex, their children, and her sister, Lynn. Lord,
            help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
            God si never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 19, August 19, December 19
            Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community
            The juniors, therefore, should honor their seniors,
            and the seniors love their juniors.

            In the very manner of address,
            let no one call another by the mere name;
            but let the seniors call their juniors Brothers,
            and the juniors call their seniors Fathers,
            by which is conveyed the reverence due to a father.
            But the Abbot,
            since he is believed to represent Christ,
            shall be called Lord and Abbot,
            not for any pretensions of his own
            but out of honor and love for Christ.
            Let the Abbot himself reflect on this,
            and show himself worthy of such an honor.

            And wherever the brethren meet one another
            the junior shall ask the senior for his blessing.
            When a senior passes by,
            a junior shall rise and give him a place to sit,
            nor shall the junior presume to sit with him
            unless his senior bid him,
            that it may be as was written,
            "In honor anticipating one another."

            Boys, both small and adolescent,
            shall keep strictly to their rank in oratory and at table.
            But outside of that, wherever they may be,
            let them be under supervision and discipline,
            until they come to the age of discretion.

            REFLECTION

            Abbot Fidelis, my late novicemaster, used to always say that
            Benedictines were "gentlemen monks." At that time, the phrase annoyed
            me a good bit, though I never said so. It seemed to have a ring of
            faint middle-class respectability about it, not a little bourgeois,
            as if we were monks who were "the right sort of people."

            It would still annoy me today if, one meant by that phrase nothing
            more than all those rather hollow social niceties. Not that there's
            anything wrong as such with social niceties, just that I have grown
            up in a country where courtesy, "civil" religion and the like often had
            precious little to do with faith itself. Such things, though
            indubitably polite, always seemed to me to be the basically
            disconnected veneer of an often mediocre faith. They can be the
            exercise of a genuine charity and animated faith, but sometimes
            they are not.

            Living among monastics will teach one (hopefully!) by osmosis that
            many of the common courtesies which have become decidedly UNcommon in
            the world are the order of the day here. We get so immersed in that
            that often it is hard to even think of what they are, we just do
            them. The best example I can come up with right now is that there is
            FAR more restraint here against interrupting another's conversation
            here than in the world at large. We do it sometimes, I do it too
            much, but basically we do NOT "butt in."

            There are many other little things, rising when a superior enters,
            not sitting until the superior does in chapter, etc. These in
            themselves may seem empty at first, but when linked to the charity of
            Christ and His Divine Mercy, they become very real gestures of love.
            The fact that we don't think of them much after a while in no way
            diminishes the Treasure that motivates them, Christ Himself.

            So, yes, my dear Abbot Fidelis, we ARE gentlemen monks (and gentle
            monastics period!) No, we are not like some terribly well-off and
            properly stuffy social elite. But we ARE gentle and we are so because of
            Him Whom we seek and have come to love more and more as we better
            see His ineffable mercy.

            Love and prayers,

            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA






            ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • jeromeleo@stmarysmonastery.org
            +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of Paul, admitted to a mental health ward with severe panic and depression, and for M., his
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 18, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              +PAX

              Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of Paul, admitted to a mental health ward with severe panic and depression, and for M., his wife and especially for his Mother. A serious family mess is complicating his mental health issues, so prayers for that, too.

              Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for John and Anne, on their 30th wedding anniversary, and also for safe travel and good weather for their trip to Norway to celebrate.

              Lord,
              help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
              God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              April 19, August 19, December 19
              Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community
              The juniors, therefore, should honor their seniors,
              and the seniors love their juniors.

              In the very manner of address,
              let no one call another by the mere name;
              but let the seniors call their juniors Brothers,
              and the juniors call their seniors Fathers,
              by which is conveyed the reverence due to a father.
              But the Abbot,
              since he is believed to represent Christ,
              shall be called Lord and Abbot,
              not for any pretensions of his own
              but out of honor and love for Christ.
              Let the Abbot himself reflect on this,
              and show himself worthy of such an honor.

              And wherever the brethren meet one another
              the junior shall ask the senior for his blessing.
              When a senior passes by,
              a junior shall rise and give him a place to sit,
              nor shall the junior presume to sit with him
              unless his senior bid him,
              that it may be as was written,
              "In honor anticipating one another."

              Boys, both small and adolescent,
              shall keep strictly to their rank in oratory and at table.
              But outside of that, wherever they may be,
              let them be under supervision and discipline,
              until they come to the age of discretion.

              REFLECTION

              Abbot Fidelis, my late novicemaster, used to always say that
              Benedictines were "gentlemen monks." At that time, the phrase annoyed
              me a good bit, though I never said so. It seemed to have a ring of
              faint middle-class respectability about it, not a little bourgeois,
              as if we were monks who were "the right sort of people."

              It would still annoy me today if, one meant by that phrase nothing
              more than all those rather hollow social niceties. Not that there's
              anything wrong as such with social niceties, just that I have grown
              up in a country where courtesy, "civil" religion and the like often had
              precious little to do with faith itself. Such things, though
              indubitably polite, always seemed to me to be the basically
              disconnected veneer of an often mediocre faith. They can be the
              exercise of a genuine charity and animated faith, but sometimes
              they are not.

              Living among monastics will teach one (hopefully!) by osmosis that
              many of the common courtesies which have become decidedly UNcommon in
              the world are the order of the day here. We get so immersed in that
              that often it is hard to even think of what they are, we just do
              them. The best example I can come up with right now is that there is
              FAR more restraint here against interrupting another's conversation
              here than in the world at large. We do it sometimes, I do it too
              much, but basically we do NOT "butt in."

              There are many other little things, rising when a superior enters,
              not sitting until the superior does in chapter, etc. These in
              themselves may seem empty at first, but when linked to the charity of
              Christ and His Divine Mercy, they become very real gestures of love.
              The fact that we don't think of them much after a while in no way
              diminishes the Treasure that motivates them, Christ Himself.

              So, yes, my dear Abbot Fidelis, we ARE gentlemen monks (and gentle
              monastics period!) No, we are not like some terribly well-off and
              properly stuffy social elite. But we ARE gentle and we are so because of
              Him Whom we seek and have come to love more and more as we better
              see His ineffable mercy.

              Love and prayers,

              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.