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Holy Rule for Apr. 14

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Alex, mononucleosis and strep throat, prayers, too, for Eric, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, facing 8 mos. of chemo, then radiation, for
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 14, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Alex, mononucleosis and strep throat, prayers, too, for Eric, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, facing 8 mos. of chemo, then radiation, for Sheila, his fiance, and for her Mom, Fran, who has pneumonia. Prayers, please, for the safety and ministry of Fr. Stephen Maekawa, OP, gone to Afghanistan as a military chaplain. Continued prayers for Dunstan's eye and Michael's shingles. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      April 14, August 14, December 14
      Chapter 60: On Priests Who May Wish to Live in the Monastery

      If any ordained priest
      should ask to be received into the monastery,
      permission shall not be granted too readily.
      But if he is quite persistent in his request,
      let him know
      that he will have to observe the whole discipline of the Rule
      and that nothing will be relaxed in his favor,
      that it may be as it is written:
      "Friend, for what have you come (Matt. 26:50)?"

      It shall be granted him, however, to stand next after the Abbot
      and to give blessings and to celebrate Mass,
      but only by order of the Abbot.
      Without such order let him not make any exceptions for himself,
      knowing that he is subject to the discipline of the Rule;
      but rather let him give an example of humility to all.

      If there happens to be question of an appointment
      or of some business in the monastery,
      let him expect the rank due him
      according to the date of his entrance into the monastery,
      and not the place granted him
      out of reverence for the priesthood.

      If any clerics, moved by the same desire,
      should wish to join the monastery,
      let them be placed in a middle rank.
      But they too are to be admitted only if they promise
      observance of the Rule and stability.

      REFLECTION

      The quintessential question of the Holy Rule is that of
      Jesus: "Friend, for what have you come?" This question is not just
      for priests, but for each of us, for all Christians and all
      monastics. The only acceptable answer to the question is: "To seek
      God." That might be rephrased in any of a number of ways, but that's
      the main event, the only game in town, the end all and be all of
      Benedictine monastic life.

      It is very necessary, in stating that we seek God, to admit that we
      haven't altogether found Him yet, nor will we ever do so before
      death. Even in the beatific vision of heaven itself, we creatures
      will never, ever get to the root of our Creator, to the "ground zero"
      of God. Ain't gonna happen.

      Another way of saying this is that we need to come to the Holy Rule
      and to the Gospel and to Christ admitting how frighteningly little we
      DO know. If we think holy orders or an MDiv or an MD or a BS have
      corrected that problem, even slightly, well, maybe the sacrament or
      that degree is just about all we've gotten from the experience.

      For heaven's sake, after spending so many years of my life trying to
      become clever, or thinking I was, what a tremendous relief it is to
      be dumb: pluperfectly, fallibly, humanly, screamingly, shriekingly
      DUMB! Boy, I love it! Ignorance truly *IS* bliss, just like they told
      ya! Truly, with Socrates, we ought to know enough to know that we
      know nothing! Realizing that the very best of us has nothing but the
      barest tip of the iceberg is a great and tender mercy, indeed!

      In one sense, I heartily recommend it. It is the only position from
      which one may learn anything at all. Get too smart (or think you
      have!) and you will never listen, failing yet another Benedictine
      hallmark. You won't learn because all your energy will go into
      composing your rejoinder or response. Such people do not learn. They
      merely joust. Life is more than that, much more. Tons more.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Marialyce, eye surgery this morning at 10 AM EST, prayers, too, for Brenda, diabetic and losing vision in her right eye, with
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 14, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Marialyce, eye surgery this morning at 10 AM EST, prayers, too, for Brenda, diabetic and losing vision in her right eye, with bleeding and distortion. For Maria and her mother, Pauline, who is on dialysis and has gone blind, and for all their family. Goodness, three eye-related intentions today. Lord of Light, may we all be free of the blindnesses that afflict us and keep us from You, gives us all true Light! Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much! JL

        April 14, August 14, December 14
        Chapter 60: On Priests Who May Wish to Live in the Monastery

        If any ordained priest
        should ask to be received into the monastery,
        permission shall not be granted too readily.
        But if he is quite persistent in his request,
        let him know
        that he will have to observe the whole discipline of the Rule
        and that nothing will be relaxed in his favor,
        that it may be as it is written:
        "Friend, for what have you come (Matt. 26:50)?"

        It shall be granted him, however, to stand next after the Abbot
        and to give blessings and to celebrate Mass,
        but only by order of the Abbot.
        Without such order let him not make any exceptions for himself,
        knowing that he is subject to the discipline of the Rule;
        but rather let him give an example of humility to all.

        If there happens to be question of an appointment
        or of some business in the monastery,
        let him expect the rank due him
        according to the date of his entrance into the monastery,
        and not the place granted him
        out of reverence for the priesthood.

        If any clerics, moved by the same desire,
        should wish to join the monastery,
        let them be placed in a middle rank.
        But they too are to be admitted only if they promise
        observance of the Rule and stability.

        REFLECTION

        One of the quintessential questions of the Holy Rule is that of
        Jesus: "Friend, for what have you come?" This question is not just
        for priests, but for each of us, for all Christians and all monastics.
        The only acceptable answer to the question is: "To seek
        God." That might be rephrased in any of a number of ways, but that's
        the main event, the only game in town, the end all and be all of
        Benedictine monastic life.

        It is very necessary, in stating that we seek God, to admit that we
        haven't altogether found Him yet, nor will we ever do so before
        death. Even in the beatific vision of heaven itself, we creatures
        will never, ever get to the root of our Creator, to the "ground zero"
        of God. Ain't gonna happen. We will just keep going deeper and
        loving more for eternity. The more we know, the more we will love,
        but we shall never know all!

        Another way of saying this is that we need to come to the Holy Rule
        and to the Gospel and to Christ admitting how frighteningly little we
        DO know. If we think holy orders or an MDiv or an MD or a BS have
        corrected that problem, even slightly, well, maybe the sacrament or
        that degree is just about all we've gotten from the experience.

        For heaven's sake, after spending so many years of my life trying to
        become clever, or thinking I was, what a tremendous relief it is to
        be dumb: pluperfectly, fallibly, humanly, screamingly, shriekingly
        DUMB! Boy, I love it! Ignorance truly *IS* bliss, just like they told
        ya! Truly, with Socrates, we ought to know enough to know that we
        know nothing! Realizing that the very best of us has nothing but the
        barest tip of the iceberg is a great and tender mercy, indeed!

        In one sense, I heartily recommend it. It is the only position from
        which one may learn anything at all. Get too smart (or think you
        have!) and you will never listen, failing yet another Benedictine
        hallmark. You won't learn because all your energy will go into
        composing your rejoinder or response. Such people do not learn. They
        merely joust. Life is more than that, much more. Tons more.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX May all of us have a Good Friday filled with prayer, reflection and deep gratitude to our Lord, who became obedient unto death for us, even to death on a
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 14, 2006
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          +PAX

          May all of us have a Good Friday filled with prayer, reflection and deep gratitude to our Lord, who "became obedient unto death for us, even to death on a Cross." If at all possible, please try to get to the Passion Service today, it is one of the most awesome, solemn and moving liturgies of the year.

          A reminder that the Divine Mercy novena of Chaplets begins today. One says the Chaplet each day till Saturday of Easter Week. If you are making the novena, please place vocations to our Petersham communities among your intentions. We would all appreciate that so much. For any first-timers, directions for saying the Chaplet may be found at :

          http://www.marian.org/divinemercy/chaplet.html

          Prayers, please for Margaret, no energy, dizziness, slow pulse and really nervous and irritable. Tests forthcoming, she may need a pacemaker, for her daughter, Mary and all her family, also for the doctors treating her, and those who treat all of our prayer intention folks. God guide their hands and minds! Continued prayers for Mr. Lentz and his family. He is now at home with hospice nursing, but could go at any time. For his happy death and for all his family at this painful and trying time.

          Prayers for Andrew, being received into the Church at the Easter Vigil, for his proud Mom, Cathy, and all his family. Prayers, too, for his 17 month old son, who may be showing signs of autism. Prayers for Johanna, going through a difficult time, and for her Mom, bearing the burden with her. Prayers for Christine, having a mastectomy on Tuesday, and for Rebecca, rare genetic disorder causing constant pain, and few treatment options left for her. She also has a very young baby, so prayers for all her family. Prayers for Bronwyn, and for her Mom, on the anniversary of her Mom's death, and for Trisha and her Mom, Anna, who also died around this time. Eternal rest and happy deaths for the Moms, grace and healing and love for those they left behind.

          April 14, August 14, December 14
          Chapter 60: On Priests Who May Wish to Live in the Monastery

          If any ordained priest
          should ask to be received into the monastery,
          permission shall not be granted too readily.
          But if he is quite persistent in his request,
          let him know
          that he will have to observe the whole discipline of the Rule
          and that nothing will be relaxed in his favor,
          that it may be as it is written:
          "Friend, for what have you come (Matt. 26:50)?"

          It shall be granted him, however, to stand next after the Abbot
          and to give blessings and to celebrate Mass,
          but only by order of the Abbot.
          Without such order let him not make any exceptions for himself,
          knowing that he is subject to the discipline of the Rule;
          but rather let him give an example of humility to all.

          If there happens to be question of an appointment
          or of some business in the monastery,
          let him expect the rank due him
          according to the date of his entrance into the monastery,
          and not the place granted him
          out of reverence for the priesthood.

          If any clerics, moved by the same desire,
          should wish to join the monastery,
          let them be placed in a middle rank.
          But they too are to be admitted only if they promise
          observance of the Rule and stability.

          REFLECTION

          One of the quintessential questions of the Holy Rule is that of
          Jesus: "Friend, for what have you come?" This question is not just
          for priests, but for each of us, for all Christians and all monastics.
          The only acceptable answer to the question is: "To seek
          God." That might be rephrased in any of a number of ways, but that's
          the main event, the only game in town, the end all and be all of
          Benedictine monastic life.

          It is very necessary, in stating that we seek God, to admit that we
          haven't altogether found Him yet, nor will we ever do so before
          death. Even in the beatific vision of heaven itself, we creatures
          will never, ever get to the root of our Creator, to the "ground zero"
          of God. Ain't gonna happen. We will just keep going deeper and
          loving more for eternity. The more we know, the more we will love,
          but we shall never know all!

          Another way of saying this is that we need to come to the Holy Rule
          and to the Gospel and to Christ admitting how frighteningly little we
          DO know. If we think holy orders or an MDiv or an MD or a BS have
          corrected that problem, even slightly, well, maybe the sacrament or
          that degree is just about all we've gotten from the experience.

          For heaven's sake, after spending so many years of my life trying to
          become clever, or thinking I was, what a tremendous relief it is to
          be dumb: pluperfectly, fallibly, humanly, screamingly, shriekingly
          DUMB! Boy, I love it! Ignorance truly *IS* bliss, just like they told
          ya! Truly, with Socrates, we ought to know enough to know that we
          know nothing! Realizing that the very best of us has nothing but the
          barest tip of the iceberg is a great and tender mercy, indeed!

          In one sense, I heartily recommend it. It is the only position from
          which one may learn anything at all. Get too smart (or think you
          have!) and you will never listen, failing yet another Benedictine
          hallmark. You won't learn because all your energy will go into
          composing your rejoinder or response. Such people do not learn. They
          merely joust. Life is more than that, much more. Tons more.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death of Anthony Benkovic, who died of brain cancer that he has been battling for a couple of years. He leaves behind his
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 13, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for the happy death of Anthony Benkovic, who died of brain
            cancer that he has been battling for a couple of years. He leaves behind his
            wife Johnette Benkovic, the force behind "Living His Life Abundantly", on the
            Catholic TV network EWTN. Please pray for the repose of his soul and
            consolation for Johnette who does so much for so many throughout the world.

            Prayers for John who is starting a new job at the end of this month. He's a
            bit nervous about it because they use different computer technology than he's
            used to and they're giving him quite an important position, so he hopes he
            can make the grade! He really needs this job! Continued prayers for little
            Griffin, slowly progressing and improving after his brain surgery. Prayers for
            Brendan, seeking a way to sell his art and also having to deal with a
            fibromyalgia flare up.

            Prayers for Earl, suffering from both heart failure and recurrent cancer,
            now in his bones, for his brother, Don, and all their family. Also for Mark, is
            being examined for what looks suspiciously like prostate cancer. Prayers
            needed for Fr. Van's sister, Loan, who has had a stroke. And prayers still
            needed for Joan, Fr. Tom's sister, who has had a series of strokes.

            Prayers for Katelyn, moved into ICU with heart problems that mirror what
            her mom and twin died of and for her distraught family, especially Tom, her Dad,
            and Shannon. Prayers for Shirley, depressed and anxious about impending
            surgery. Fill her with trust, Lord! Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest
            of Amelia, mother of Bishop John Kudrick, Byzantine Catholic Bishop of Parma,
            and for Bishop John and all her family, all who mourn her. Lord, help us all
            as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is
            never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 14, August 14, December 14
            Chapter 60: On Priests Who May Wish to Live in the Monastery

            If any ordained priest
            should ask to be received into the monastery,
            permission shall not be granted too readily.
            But if he is quite persistent in his request,
            let him know
            that he will have to observe the whole discipline of the Rule
            and that nothing will be relaxed in his favor,
            that it may be as it is written:
            "Friend, for what have you come (Matt. 26:50)?"

            It shall be granted him, however, to stand next after the Abbot
            and to give blessings and to celebrate Mass,
            but only by order of the Abbot.
            Without such order let him not make any exceptions for himself,
            knowing that he is subject to the discipline of the Rule;
            but rather let him give an example of humility to all.

            If there happens to be question of an appointment
            or of some business in the monastery,
            let him expect the rank due him
            according to the date of his entrance into the monastery,
            and not the place granted him
            out of reverence for the priesthood.

            If any clerics, moved by the same desire,
            should wish to join the monastery,
            let them be placed in a middle rank.
            But they too are to be admitted only if they promise
            observance of the Rule and stability.

            REFLECTION

            One of the quintessential questions of the Holy Rule is that of
            Jesus: "Friend, for what have you come?" This question is not just
            for priests, but for each of us, for all Christians and all monastics.
            The only acceptable answer to the question is: "To seek
            God." That might be rephrased in any of a number of ways, but that's
            the main event, the only game in town, the end all and be all of
            Benedictine monastic life.

            It is very necessary, in stating that we seek God, to admit that we
            haven't altogether found Him yet, nor will we ever do so before
            death. Even in the beatific vision of heaven itself, we creatures
            will never, ever get to the root of our Creator, to the "ground zero"
            of God. Ain't gonna happen. We will just keep going deeper and
            loving more for eternity. The more we know, the more we will love,
            but we shall never know all!

            Another way of saying this is that we need to come to the Holy Rule
            and to the Gospel and to Christ admitting how frighteningly little we
            DO know. If we think holy orders or an MDiv or an MD or a BS have
            corrected that problem, even slightly, well, maybe the sacrament or
            that degree is just about all we've gotten from the experience.

            For heaven's sake, after spending so many years of my life trying to
            become clever, or thinking I was, what a tremendous relief it is to
            be dumb: pluperfectly, fallibly, humanly, screamingly, shriekingly
            DUMB! Boy, I love it! Ignorance truly *IS* bliss, just like they told
            ya! Truly, with Socrates, we ought to know enough to know that we
            know nothing! Realizing that the very best of us has nothing but the
            barest tip of the iceberg is a great and tender mercy, indeed!

            In one sense, I heartily recommend it. It is the only position from
            which one may learn anything at all. Get too smart (or think you
            have!) and you will never listen, failing yet another Benedictine
            hallmark. You won't learn because all your energy will go into
            composing your rejoinder or response. Such people do not learn. They
            merely joust. Life is more than that, much more. Tons more.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA






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