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Holy Rule for Apr. 9

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX A blessed Triduum to all! Prayers, please, for Michael, who has shingles. Prayers, too, for Marie Mackey s Mom, heart valve surgery pending. God s will is
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 9 9:29 AM
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      +PAX

      A blessed Triduum to all!

      Prayers, please, for Michael, who has shingles. Prayers, too, for Marie Mackey's Mom, heart valve surgery pending.
      God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Thanks so much! JL

      April 9, August 9, December 9
      Chapter 56: On the Abbess's Table

      Let the Abbess's table always be with the guests
      and the pilgrims. But when there are no guests,
      let it be in her power to invite whom she will of the sisters.
      Yet one or two seniors must always be left with the others
      for the sake of discipline.

      REFLECTION

      Let me give you a bit of pragmatic application here. I don't know if
      this is true everywhere, but in both houses I have actually lived in,
      the monks tended to eat rather fast. Secularly speaking, I have a
      reputation for being a fast eater when dining alone, even I have
      sometimes wondered about how good that is for digestion! Here,
      however, with no conversation to slow me down at all, the monks eat
      like the wind and I am always the last one, even when gulping down as
      fast as I can. This has resulted in my learning to take less and
      finish whatever I really need at the guesthouse! Sigh...

      Anyway, the upshot here is that guests often dine more slowly than
      the monastics and we all get up together for grace. If the guests are
      where the Abbot can see them, it is easier to check on who's done and
      who isn't. We wait for them to finish. (At least 99% of the time. I
      have known especially slow guests to win at this face-off once or
      twice! We finally just said grace and left them to finish...)

      Monastics (like children or spouses!) can be dreadful creatures of
      habit, you should pardon the pun... I can tell you that sometimes
      that waiting seems interminable. I can also tell you that it is good
      for us, for all of us, and this applies equally to families. We
      allow, even enable the guest to inconvenience us to a certain extent.
      That's part of our hospitality, part of receiving Christ, often in a
      considerably distressing disguise.

      Oblates in families, trust me on this one, I know company can
      sometimes be a pain. I have had company most of the time for the last
      seven years. While I relish the occasional days when the house is
      empty, they are fewer and farther between each year. The message here
      is not only for guests in our homes, but for others in general, at
      work, when shopping or (horrors!) driving. Let others put you out a
      bit. Adopt a courtesy that is greater than the world's.

      I used to work the desk in a public library. From that and from my
      hospital and teaching years, I can tell you that a courteous,
      hospitable, Christian attitude of charity can stand out, really touch
      people. You don't have to be obnoxiously preachy, in fact, that has
      the opposite effect! The subtle grace and love of courtesy will lead
      a lot of people to wonder about you and what motivates you. Some of
      the braver ones will one day even ask. And there is your chance! Go
      slowly and gently, but tell them why.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@...
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Cindy, recovering from a total hysterectomy done yesterday that, Deo gratias, went very well, but now in a lot of pain and troubled
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 9 6:18 AM
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Cindy, recovering from a total hysterectomy done yesterday that, Deo gratias, went very well, but now in a lot of pain and troubled by back and shoulder troubles unrelated that make it nearly impossible for her to be comfortable in bed. Prayers for Ben, her husband, holding down the fort at home with three kids. Ben is the carpenter which the serious hand injury for whom we prayed: and now his volunteer labors are beautifying the guesthouse! Prayers for Marj Hayes, being buried today, and all her family. Continued prayers for Tim, doing well in Rehab, Deo gratias, but still has a long road to recovery ahead. Prayers for grace and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit for the ACT Region 17 retreat to be held the weekend of April 16. Prayers, too, for Diana, knee replacement surgery on April 11. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

        April 9, August 9, December 9
        Chapter 56: On the Abbess's Table

        Let the Abbess's table always be with the guests
        and the pilgrims. But when there are no guests,
        let it be in her power to invite whom she will of the sisters.
        Yet one or two seniors must always be left with the others
        for the sake of discipline.

        REFLECTION

        Let me give you a bit of pragmatic application here. I don't know if
        this is true everywhere, but in both houses I have actually lived in,
        the monks tended to eat rather fast. Secularly speaking, I have a
        reputation for being a fast eater when dining alone, though I have
        sometimes wondered about how good that is for digestion! Here,
        however, with no conversation to slow me down at all, the monks eat
        like the wind and I am always the last one, even when gulping down as
        fast as I can. This has resulted in my learning to take less and
        finish whatever I really need at the guesthouse! Sigh...

        Anyway, the upshot here is that guests often dine more slowly than
        the monastics and we all get up together for grace. If the guests are
        where the Abbot can see them, it is easier to check on who's done and
        who isn't. We wait for them to finish. (At least 99% of the time. I
        have known especially slow guests to win at this face-off once or
        twice! We finally just said grace and left them to finish...)

        Monastics (like children or spouses!) can be dreadful creatures of
        habit, you should pardon the pun... I can tell you that sometimes
        that waiting seems interminable. I can also tell you that it is good
        for us, for all of us, and this applies equally to families. We
        allow, even enable the guest to inconvenience us to a certain extent.
        That's part of our hospitality, part of receiving Christ, often in a
        considerably distressing disguise.

        Oblates in families, trust me on this one, I know company can
        sometimes be a pain. I have had company most of the time for the last
        eight years. While I relish the occasional days when the house is
        empty, they are fewer and farther between each year. The message here
        is not only for guests in our homes, but for others in general, at
        work, when shopping or (horrors!) driving. Let others put you out a
        bit. Adopt a courtesy that is greater than the world's.

        I used to work the desk in a public library. From that and from my
        hospital and teaching years, I can tell you that a courteous,
        hospitable, Christian attitude of charity can stand out, really touch
        people. You don't have to be obnoxiously preachy, in fact, that has
        the opposite effect! The subtle grace and love of courtesy will lead
        a lot of people to wonder about you and what motivates you. Some of
        the braver ones will one day even ask. And there is your chance! Go
        slowly and gently, but tell them why.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        jeromeleo@...
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Prayers, please, for Mother Dominic, a retired Abbess, dying of metastatic pancreatic cancer, for her happy death and eternal rest, for all her community
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 9 6:03 AM
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          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for Mother Dominic, a retired Abbess, dying of metastatic pancreatic cancer, for her happy death and eternal rest, for all her community and family and those who are treating her. Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Jean, very near death, and for her daughter, Barbara, and for all their family. This family earlier lost Henry, for whom we prayed and, a few months before that, another relative, so hopefully some respite for them is forthcoming. Prayers, please for Bill, still seriously grieving for his wife of many years who died two years ago this month, for her happy death and eternal rest and for peace and strength for Bill. Continued prayers for Joyce and her beloved pet, Jesse, he is doing well, but diagnosis is still uncertain. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL


          April 9, August 9, December 9
          Chapter 56: On the Abbess's Table

          Let the Abbess's table always be with the guests
          and the pilgrims. But when there are no guests,
          let it be in her power to invite whom she will of the sisters.
          Yet one or two seniors must always be left with the others
          for the sake of discipline.

          REFLECTION

          Let me give you a bit of pragmatic application here. I don't know if
          this is true everywhere, but in both houses I have actually lived in,
          the monks tended to eat rather fast. Secularly speaking, I have a
          reputation for being a fast eater when dining alone, though I have
          sometimes wondered about how good that is for digestion! Here,
          however, with no conversation to slow me down at all, the monks eat
          like the wind and I am usually the last one, even when gulping down as
          fast as I can.

          Anyway, the upshot here is that guests often dine more slowly than
          the monastics and we all get up together for grace. If the guests are
          where the Abbot can see them, it is easier to check on who's done and
          who isn't. We wait for them to finish. (At least 99% of the time. I
          have known especially slow guests to win at this face-off once or
          twice! We finally just said grace and left them to finish...)

          Monastics (like children or spouses!) can be dreadful creatures of
          habit, you should pardon the pun... I can tell you that sometimes
          that waiting seems interminable. I can also tell you that it is good
          for us, for all of us, and this applies equally to families. We
          allow, even enable the guest to inconvenience us to a certain extent.
          That's part of our hospitality, part of receiving Christ, often in a
          considerably distressing disguise.

          Oblates in families, trust me on this one, I know company can
          sometimes be a pain. I have had company most of the time for the last
          nine years. While I relish the occasional days when the house is
          empty, they are few and far between. The message here
          is not only for guests in our homes, but for others in general, at
          work, when shopping or (horrors!) driving. Let others put you out a
          bit. Adopt a courtesy that is greater than the world's.

          I used to work the desk in a public library. From that and from my
          hospital and teaching years, I can tell you that a courteous,
          hospitable, Christian attitude of charity can stand out, really touch
          people. You don't have to be obnoxiously preachy, in fact, that has
          the opposite effect!

          The subtle grace and love of courtesy will lead a lot of people to
          wonder about you and what motivates you. Some of the braver ones
          will one day even ask. And there is your chance! Go slowly and gently,
          but tell them why.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          jeromeleo@...
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Mary, and for Michael, her grandnephew, and other surviving family members and all who mourn her.
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 8 6:21 PM
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            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Mary, and for
            Michael, her grandnephew, and other surviving family members and all who mourn
            her. Prayers for Mike, possibly depressed and likely in denial about it, dropped
            out of college, bankruptcy and numerous other life problems and not getting
            any help, wanting to quit his job. Prayers, too, for his worried family,
            especially his parents and aunt. He has also fallen away from his Faith, so
            prayers all around.

            Continued prayers for Br. Vincent, his brother Steve, recovering slowly from
            his stroke, and for all their family. His Dad is homebound, so this is
            particularly hard on his elderly Mom, Vita, so special prayers for her. Lord, help
            us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
            is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 9, August 9, December 9
            Chapter 56: On the Abbess's Table

            Let the Abbess's table always be with the guests
            and the pilgrims. But when there are no guests,
            let it be in her power to invite whom she will of the sisters.
            Yet one or two seniors must always be left with the others
            for the sake of discipline.

            REFLECTION

            Let me give you a bit of pragmatic application here. I don't know if
            this is true everywhere, but in both houses I have actually lived in,
            the monks tended to eat rather fast. Secularly speaking, I have a
            reputation for being a fast eater when dining alone, though I have
            sometimes wondered about how good that is for digestion! Here,
            however, with no conversation to slow me down at all, the monks eat
            like the wind and I am usually the last one, even when gulping down as
            fast as I can.

            Anyway, the upshot here is that guests often dine more slowly than
            the monastics and we all get up together for grace. If the guests are
            where the Abbot can see them, it is easier to check on who's done and
            who isn't. We wait for them to finish. (At least 99% of the time. I
            have known especially slow guests to win at this face-off once or
            twice! We finally just said grace and left them to finish...)

            Monastics (like children or spouses!) can be dreadful creatures of
            habit, you should pardon the pun... I can tell you that sometimes
            that waiting seems interminable. I can also tell you that it is good
            for us, for all of us, and this applies equally to families. We
            allow, even enable the guest to inconvenience us to a certain extent.
            That's part of our hospitality, part of receiving Christ, often in a
            considerably distressing disguise.

            Oblates in families, trust me on this one, I know company can
            sometimes be a pain. I have had company most of the time for the last
            nine years. While I relish the occasional days when the house is
            empty, they are few and far between. The message here
            is not only for guests in our homes, but for others in general, at
            work, when shopping or (horrors!) driving. Let others put you out a
            bit. Adopt a courtesy that is greater than the world's.

            I used to work the desk in a public library. From that and from my
            hospital and teaching years, I can tell you that a courteous,
            hospitable, Christian attitude of charity can stand out, really touch
            people. You don't have to be obnoxiously preachy, in fact, that has
            the opposite effect!

            The subtle grace and love of courtesy will lead a lot of people to
            wonder about you and what motivates you. Some of the braver ones
            will one day even ask. And there is your chance! Go slowly and gently,
            but tell them why.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            Petersham, MA




            ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • jeromeleo@stmarysmonastery.org
            +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and phsyical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Fr. Daniel, OSB,
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 8 8:41 AM
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              +PAX

              Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and phsyical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

              Fr. Daniel, OSB, in hospital for dialysis.

              P., anxiety and depression very sever just now.

              Brie, a contact lens rip acidnet, but Deo gratias, no corneal abrasions.

              Cat, she has MS.

              Ann Marie, terribly apprehensive about having to go for a hip replacement, lots of anxiety about hospitalization.

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
              is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              April 9, August 9, December 9
              Chapter 56: On the Abbess's Table

              Let the Abbess's table always be with the guests
              and the pilgrims. But when there are no guests,
              let it be in her power to invite whom she will of the sisters.
              Yet one or two seniors must always be left with the others
              for the sake of discipline.

              REFLECTION

              Let me give you a bit of pragmatic application here. I don't know if
              this is true everywhere, but in both houses I have actually lived in,
              the monks tended to eat rather fast. Secularly speaking, I have a
              reputation for being a fast eater when dining alone, though I have
              sometimes wondered about how good that is for digestion! Here,
              however, with no conversation to slow me down at all, the monks eat
              like the wind and I am usually the last one, even when gulping down as
              fast as I can.

              Anyway, the upshot here is that guests often dine more slowly than
              the monastics and we all get up together for grace. If the guests are
              where the Abbot can see them, it is easier to check on who's done and
              who isn't. We wait for them to finish. (At least 99% of the time. I
              have known especially slow guests to win at this face-off once or
              twice! We finally just said grace and left them to finish...)

              Monastics (like children or spouses!) can be dreadful creatures of
              habit, you should pardon the pun... I can tell you that sometimes
              that waiting seems interminable. I can also tell you that it is good
              for us, for all of us, and this applies equally to families. We
              allow, even enable the guest to inconvenience us to a certain extent.
              That's part of our hospitality, part of receiving Christ, often in a
              considerably distressing disguise.

              Oblates in families, trust me on this one, I know company can
              sometimes be a pain. I have had company most of the time for the last
              nine years. While I relish the occasional days when the house is
              empty, they are few and far between. The message here
              is not only for guests in our homes, but for others in general, at
              work, when shopping or (horrors!) driving. Let others put you out a
              bit. Adopt a courtesy that is greater than the world's.

              I used to work the desk in a public library. From that and from my
              hospital and teaching years, I can tell you that a courteous,
              hospitable, Christian attitude of charity can stand out, really touch
              people. You don't have to be obnoxiously preachy, in fact, that has
              the opposite effect!

              The subtle grace and love of courtesy will lead a lot of people to
              wonder about you and what motivates you. Some of the braver ones
              will one day even ask. And there is your chance! Go slowly and gently,
              but tell them why.

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA









              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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