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Holy Rule for Mar. 29

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Jeremy, 21, died of an aortic aneurysm, and for his family, especially his brother. prayers, too, for Kathy, open heart surgery on
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 29, 2004
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Jeremy, 21, died of an aortic aneurysm, and for his
      family, especially his brother. prayers, too, for Kathy, open heart surgery
      on Thursday, and for Tim, her husband, and family. God's will is best.
      All is mercy and grace. Thanks so much! JL

      March 29, July 29, November 28
      Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

      From the Calends of October until the beginning of Lent,
      let them apply themselves to reading
      up to the end of the second hour.

      At the second hour let Terce be said,
      and then let all labor at the work assigned them until None.
      At the first signal for the Hour of None
      let everyone break off from her work,
      and hold herself ready for the sounding of the second signal.
      After the meal
      let them apply themselves to their reading or to the Psalms.

      On the days of Lent,
      from morning until the end of the third hour
      let them apply themselves to their reading,
      and from then until the end of the tenth hour
      let them do the work assigned them.
      And in these days of Lent
      they shall each receive a book from the library,
      which they shall read straight through from the beginning.
      These books are to be given out at the beginning of Lent.

      But certainly one or two of the seniors should be deputed
      to go about the monastery
      at the hours when the sisters are occupied in reading
      and see that there be no lazy sister
      who spends her time in idleness or gossip
      and does not apply herself to the reading,
      so that she is not only unprofitable to herself
      but also distracts others.
      If such a one be found (which God forbid),
      let her be corrected once and a second time;
      if she does not amend,
      let her undergo the punishment of the Rule
      in such a way that the rest may take warning.

      Moreover, one sister shall not associate with another
      at inappropriate times.

      REFLECTION

      Lectio divina, sacred reading, is the Benedictine form of
      contemplation, more ancient than many later forms, both Carmelite and
      Athonite. Being so ancient, it comes with very few directions. Much
      of its "method" has been developed and handed down by monastics over
      the centuries since St. Benedict. Even in that embellished form, it
      remains a very, very simple and efficient means to contemplative
      prayer. One simply reads Scripture or the Fathers (or Mothers!)
      slowly, reflectively, ruminating (like a cow chewing its cud!) on
      each word and verse. As St. Romuald later observed, one waits like a
      chick for whatever its mother gives it. One does not read to get
      through the book. One reads to see if and when the Holy Spirit calls
      us to higher prayer with a word or phrase that strikes the heart. At
      that point, one should follow one's heart and not worry about
      finishing the page! Cleared for takeoff!

      It is interesting that St. Benedict weaves all these schedules of
      contemplative reading and prayer together with his manual labor
      concerns, without any ado. There's another example of the dignity and
      holiness of work in a Benedictine theology. Our work, too, is prayer.
      It must be. We must, somehow, learn to be all prayer. That same
      ruminative mindfulness that colors our lectio must color our labor as
      well. It is a different form of attention, a different form of
      prayer, but it is prayer nonetheless! Just ask any gardener or cook
      with a mystical heart or, for that matter, any toilet cleaner or
      diaper changer of the same ilk!

      The Carmelites prescribe mental prayer, which should, with
      recollection, spread throughout one's day. The hesychasts of Mount
      Athos, Romania and Russia stress the Jesus Prayer, said vocally until
      it becomes automatic in the heart at all times. Both of these are
      more explicit methodologies, but the Benedictine aim is the same:
      prayer without ceasing, prayer in choir and garden and cell, prayer
      at reading and prayer at work. Mindfulness of God at all times is the
      contemplative goal of all these systems.

      This is just my own opinion, but I am inclined to think that the
      Dominican concept of contemplation comes closest to our own, largely
      because of their love of study. Study, for the Dominican, is often
      very similar to lectio in the Benedictine scheme of things. Why?
      Because the Dominican seeks Truth, and Jesus said: "I am the Truth."
      A Dominican could be reading Karl Marx and still know that every bit
      of real, objective truth garnered from that reading would be yet
      another shard, no matter how small, in the infinite mosaic of the
      face of Christ. That is a mosaic none of us shall ever complete in
      this life, but oh, how much more familiar He shall seem to us when we
      meet Him because of it!

      Maybe I'm just prejudiced, but I think that a Dominican education,
      such as I had, is a wonderful preparation for Benedictine life.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Richard, 35, just diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer which has spread to his liver, and for his wife, Karen and their baby daughter,
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 29, 2005
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Richard, 35, just diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer which has spread to his liver, and for his wife, Karen and their baby daughter, Amelia. He is starting chemo but the prospects are still very uncertain- for skill for his doctors and heightened faith and right discernment for all his family. Continued prayers for Terry Schiavo's happy death. Prayers for Joe, massive systemic infection, blocked small intestine, in critical condition, and for all his family. Prayers for Marialyce, whose eye surgery has been moved up a bit, for a successful operation and recovery. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

        March 30, July 30, November 29

        Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

        On Sundays, let all occupy themselves in reading,
        except those who have been appointed to various duties.
        But if anyone should be so negligent and shiftless
        that she will not or cannot study or read,
        let her be given some work to do
        so that she will not be idle.

        Weak or sickly sisters should be assigned a task or craft
        of such a nature as to keep them from idleness
        and at the same time not to overburden them or drive them away
        with excessive toil.
        Their weakness must be taken into consideration by the Abbess.

        REFLECTION

        The greatest mentor in my monastic life was Brother Patrick Creamer,
        OSB, of St. Leo Abbey in Florida. I learned more from Brother Patrick
        than I have from any other monk. He had more influence on my life
        than any man other than my father. He died last September, two weeks short
        of his 90th birthday. Say a prayer for him. My debt to him is great and much
        of what I pass on to you I received from Patrick first. I have long
        hoped that even in the slightest and most occasional of ways, I could
        be a Patrick now and then to someone else.

        Years ago, Brother Patrick told me: "Never judge yourself by others-
        there will always be people who will do more than you and people who
        do less." There's a very obvious corollary to that maxim: never judge
        others by yourself, either! I have struggled for years to learn both.
        I still have not succeeded, but I keep trying. Every time I remember
        those words I am shamed at how many more times I forget them. I hope
        and pray all of you are much better students of life than I am!

        The Abbot is not the only one who has to see, really see weakness and
        allow for it. All of us do. That's what it means to bear one
        another's burdens as well as we can. If and when so-and-so finally
        gets their act together, it is highly unlikely that they will be an
        exact clone of someone so utterly perfect as ourselves! We can be so
        self-centered that we unwittingly actually expect that to happen. If
        we stop to look at how ludicrous such a thing is, we'll have to
        laugh, because if we didn't, we'd cry.

        God made individuals, tons of them. Their optimal state is going to
        be just as individual, just as different , one from another. Hey,
        that's the beauty of the mosaic, which would, after all, have all the
        charm of a tiled floor if all the pieces were the same color and
        boring shape...

        It is not just the weakness of others we have to see. We have to see
        our own, as well. How many people there are who are thinking: "When
        Jerome gets his ducks in a row, he'll be just like me." Sorry, y'all.
        Ain't gonna happen, no more than you all are going to wind up (God
        forbid!) looking frighteningly like me. Strengths and weakness are
        the only tools we have to work with. If we don't even see them, they
        won't be much good.

        I confess that I do not know 20% of what my computer can do. I'll
        probably never know most of its ability. That's often the case with
        computers, but how tragic it is if we allow that to happen with
        ourselves. That's why the monastic struggle points us to even deeper
        self-examination, self-knowledge and humility. Hey, a hard drive is
        neither here nor there in many senses, but a human soul needs a LOT
        of disk scanning and defragmentation. There'd better be a good anti-
        virus program, too, as well as lots of extra memory! Fortunately,
        these things cost nowhere near what software does. They were all
        bought for us at a tremendous price. Just ask the Guy Who did that
        and He'll give you all the free downloads you could ever need!



        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, and for all their loved ones: Jim and for his wife, Peggy, also for Sr. Noreen and Br.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 27, 2008
          +PAX

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, and for all their loved ones: Jim and for his wife, Peggy, also for Sr. Noreen and Br. Peter and for those who mourn them. Eva, Dave's Mom, who has slipped into a coma.

          Prayers, please, for LP, for the right job.

          Prayers that all terrorist acts, especially like those plotted for Ontario, will be foiled with no loss of life.

          Prayers for the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of the following, for all their loved ones and all who treat them:

          Kevin, atrial fibrillation has returned after surgery, and for Hilda, his wife, and their two toddlers. They are finding their way back to Church through this crisis, so extra prayers for grace.

          Deo gratias and continued prayers for Philip, recovering nicely from hsi stroke, but still a lot of rehab to go.

          Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
          mercy
          and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 29, July 29, November 28
          Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

          From the Calends of October until the beginning of Lent,
          let them apply themselves to reading
          up to the end of the second hour.

          At the second hour let Terce be said,
          and then let all labor at the work assigned them until None.
          At the first signal for the Hour of None
          let everyone break off from her work,
          and hold herself ready for the sounding of the second signal.
          After the meal
          let them apply themselves to their reading or to the Psalms.

          On the days of Lent,
          from morning until the end of the third hour
          let them apply themselves to their reading,
          and from then until the end of the tenth hour
          let them do the work assigned them.
          And in these days of Lent
          they shall each receive a book from the library,
          which they shall read straight through from the beginning.
          These books are to be given out at the beginning of Lent.

          But certainly one or two of the seniors should be deputed
          to go about the monastery
          at the hours when the sisters are occupied in reading
          and see that there be no lazy sister
          who spends her time in idleness or gossip
          and does not apply herself to the reading,
          so that she is not only unprofitable to herself
          but also distracts others.
          If such a one be found (which God forbid),
          let her be corrected once and a second time;
          if she does not amend,
          let her undergo the punishment of the Rule
          in such a way that the rest may take warning.

          Moreover, one sister shall not associate with another
          at inappropriate times.

          REFLECTION

          Lectio divina, sacred reading, is the Benedictine form of
          contemplation, more ancient than many later forms, both Carmelite and
          Athonite. Being so ancient, it comes with very few directions. Much
          of its "method" has been developed and handed down by monastics over
          the centuries since St. Benedict. Even in that embellished form, it
          remains a very, very simple and efficient means to contemplative
          prayer. One simply reads Scripture or the Fathers (or Mothers!)
          slowly, reflectively, ruminating (like a cow chewing its cud!) on
          each word and verse. As St. Romuald later observed, one waits like a
          chick for whatever its mother gives it. One does not read to get
          through the book. One reads to see if and when the Holy Spirit calls
          us to higher prayer with a word or phrase that strikes the heart. At
          that point, one should follow one's heart and not worry about
          finishing the page! Cleared for takeoff!

          It is interesting that St. Benedict weaves all these schedules of
          contemplative reading and prayer together with his manual labor
          concerns, without any ado. There's another example of the dignity and
          holiness of work in a Benedictine theology. Our work, too, is prayer.
          It must be. We must, somehow, learn to be all prayer. That same
          ruminative mindfulness that colors our lectio must color our labor as
          well. It is a different form of attention, a different form of
          prayer, but it is prayer nonetheless! Just ask any gardener or cook
          with a mystical heart or, for that matter, any toilet cleaner or
          diaper changer of the same ilk!

          The Carmelites prescribe mental prayer, which should, with
          recollection, spread throughout one's day. The hesychasts of Mount
          Athos, Romania and Russia stress the Jesus Prayer, said vocally until
          it becomes automatic in the heart at all times. Both of these are
          more explicit methodologies, but the Benedictine aim is the same:
          prayer without ceasing, prayer in choir and garden and cell, prayer
          at reading and prayer at work. Mindfulness of God at all times is the
          contemplative goal of all these systems.

          This is just my own opinion, but I am inclined to think that the
          Dominican concept of contemplation comes closest to our own, largely
          because of their love of study. Study, for the Dominican, is often
          very similar to lectio in the Benedictine scheme of things. Why?
          Because the Dominican seeks Truth, and Jesus said: "I am the Truth."
          A Dominican could be reading Karl Marx and still know that every bit
          of real, objective truth garnered from that reading would be yet
          another shard, no matter how small, in the infinite mosaic of the
          face of Christ. That is a mosaic none of us shall ever complete in
          this life, but oh, how much more familiar He shall seem to us when we
          meet Him because of it!

          Maybe I'm just prejudiced, but I think that a Dominican education,
          such as I had, is a wonderful preparation for Benedictine life.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Mother Angelica, 92, foundress of EWTN, and for her family, Community and all who mourn her. May EWTN continue to be
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 28, 2016
            +PAX



            Prayers for the eternal rest of Mother Angelica, 92, foundress of EWTN, and
            for her family, Community and all who mourn her. May EWTN continue to be
            faithful to the ideals with which she embued it.



            Continued prayers for Fr. Tom, abducted in Yemen, for his safe return and
            for the conversion and repentance of his captors. I know some sources are
            saying now that he was crucified, but until I hear that from his Salesian
            superiors, who earlier dismissed the threats as rumors, I choose to continue
            to pray for his safe release.



            Prayers for Ian, Fr. Dunstan's father, grieving his wife severely and in the
            hospital with a stomach ulcer. Prayers, too, for Fr. Dunstan and his brother
            and sister and all their family.



            Prayers for the eternal rest of Kristian, 26, who overdosed, and for his
            parents, Joy and Dick and his siblings, esp. Buddy and Abby, and for all who
            mourn him.



            Prayers for the eternal rest of Milutin, and for his daughter, Milanka, and
            all his family and all who mourn him.



            Prayers for Fr. Tom and Micheal,, his cat. Micheal is very ill with a
            bladder blockage, but showing signs of improvement. Prayers he recovers
            fully and has many more years with Fr. Tom.



            Continued prayers for Michael, for whom we prayed, he has to go on dialysis
            and will have to travel back and forth from his home to get it.



            Deo gratias, the young man, a potential suicide, being sought by the police,
            was found alive. Prayers that he gets the help he needs.



            Prayers for Marion. She had a sudden attack of diverticulitis. She will be
            seeing her primary doctor on Thursday to get results of x rays and cat scans
            taken. Prayers please for her healing and a good diagnosis. Prayers too for
            her husband, Bob, who is understandably very concerned.



            Prayers for Elaine, feeling overwhelmed at work.



            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
            mercy
            and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            March 29, July 29, November 28
            Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

            From the Calends of October until the beginning of Lent,
            let them apply themselves to reading
            up to the end of the second hour.

            At the second hour let Terce be said,
            and then let all labor at the work assigned them until None.
            At the first signal for the Hour of None
            let everyone break off from her work,
            and hold herself ready for the sounding of the second signal.
            After the meal
            let them apply themselves to their reading or to the Psalms.

            On the days of Lent,
            from morning until the end of the third hour
            let them apply themselves to their reading,
            and from then until the end of the tenth hour
            let them do the work assigned them.
            And in these days of Lent
            they shall each receive a book from the library,
            which they shall read straight through from the beginning.
            These books are to be given out at the beginning of Lent.

            But certainly one or two of the seniors should be deputed
            to go about the monastery
            at the hours when the sisters are occupied in reading
            and see that there be no lazy sister
            who spends her time in idleness or gossip
            and does not apply herself to the reading,
            so that she is not only unprofitable to herself
            but also distracts others.
            If such a one be found (which God forbid),
            let her be corrected once and a second time;
            if she does not amend,
            let her undergo the punishment of the Rule
            in such a way that the rest may take warning.

            Moreover, one sister shall not associate with another
            at inappropriate times.

            REFLECTION

            Lectio divina, sacred reading, is the Benedictine form of
            contemplation, more ancient than many later forms.
            Being so ancient, it comes with very few directions. Much
            of its "method" has been developed and handed down by monastics over
            the centuries since St. Benedict. Even in that embellished form, it
            remains a very, very simple and efficient means to contemplative
            prayer. One simply reads Scripture or the Fathers (or Mothers!)
            slowly, reflectively, ruminating (like a cow chewing its cud!) on
            each word and verse. As St. Romuald later observed, one waits like a
            chick for whatever its mother gives it. One does not read to get
            through the book. One reads to see if and when the Holy Spirit calls
            us to higher prayer with a word or phrase that strikes the heart. At
            that point, one should follow one's heart and not worry about
            finishing the page! Cleared for takeoff!

            It is interesting that St. Benedict weaves all these schedules of
            contemplative reading and prayer together with his manual labor
            concerns, without any ado. There's another example of the dignity and
            holiness of work in a Benedictine theology. Our work, too, is prayer.
            It must be. We must, somehow, learn to be all prayer. That same
            ruminative mindfulness that colors our lectio must color our labor as
            well. It is a different form of attention, a different form of
            prayer, but it is prayer nonetheless! Just ask any gardener or cook
            with a mystical heart or, for that matter, any toilet cleaner or
            diaper changer of the same ilk!

            The Carmelites prescribe mental prayer, which should, with
            recollection, spread throughout one's day. The hesychasts of Mount
            Athos, Romania and Russia stress the Jesus Prayer, said vocally until
            it becomes automatic in the heart at all times. Both of these are
            more explicit methodologies, but the Benedictine aim is the same:
            prayer without ceasing, prayer in choir and garden and cell, prayer
            at reading and prayer at work. Mindfulness of God at all times is the
            contemplative goal of all these systems.

            This is just my own opinion, but I am inclined to think that the
            Dominican concept of contemplation comes closest to our own, largely
            because of their love of study. Study, for the Dominican, is often
            very similar to lectio in the Benedictine scheme of things. Why?
            Because the Dominican seeks Truth, and Jesus said: "I am the Truth."
            A Dominican could be reading just about anything and still know that every
            bit
            of real, objective truth garnered from that reading would be yet
            another shard, no matter how small, in the infinite mosaic of the
            face of Christ. That is a mosaic none of us shall ever complete in
            this life, but oh, how much more familiar He shall seem to us when we
            meet Him because of it!

            Maybe I'm just prejudiced, but I think that a Dominican education,
            such as I had, is a wonderful preparation for Benedictine life. Prayers,
            please, for all the Dominicans, especially those who taught me.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA











            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • russophile2002
            +PAX Prayers for all babies suffering from Leigh’s syndrome, may a cure soon be found. Prayers for their parents and families, too, and for all caring for
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 28

              +PAX

               

              Prayers for all babies suffering from Leigh’s syndrome, may a cure soon be found. Prayers for their parents and families, too, and for all caring for them and those hunting for treatments and a cure.

               

              Prayers for Amy and Mike, this is their first pregnancy and the ultrasound revealed triplets. Many prayers for a safe and smooth pregnancy and a safe delivery of three healthy babies, as well as for a healthy Mom. Prayers for both new parents that God helps them cope with so many challenges.

               

              Please pray for continued success and blessings for Randal Powers and all at the Midwest Theological Forum.

               

              Prayers for healing and strength for Lee, 15, who has developed a serious drug problem with the familiar patterns of disappearing for several days at a time and stealing to support it. Prayers also for his family, who is in shock over the discovery.

               

              Please pray that Gemma's mother-in-law will consent to assisted living. She is 96 and fading

               

              Prayers for the eternal rest of Kristian, 26, who overdosed, and for his parents, Joy and Dick and his siblings, Jason, Buddy and Abby, and for all who
              mourn him.

               

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
              mercy
              and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              March 29, July 29, November 28
              Chapter 48: On the Daily Manual Labor

              From the Calends of October until the beginning of Lent,
              let them apply themselves to reading
              up to the end of the second hour.

              At the second hour let Terce be said,
              and then let all labor at the work assigned them until None.
              At the first signal for the Hour of None
              let everyone break off from her work,
              and hold herself ready for the sounding of the second signal.
              After the meal
              let them apply themselves to their reading or to the Psalms.

              On the days of Lent,
              from morning until the end of the third hour
              let them apply themselves to their reading,
              and from then until the end of the tenth hour
              let them do the work assigned them.
              And in these days of Lent
              they shall each receive a book from the library,
              which they shall read straight through from the beginning.
              These books are to be given out at the beginning of Lent.

              But certainly one or two of the seniors should be deputed
              to go about the monastery
              at the hours when the sisters are occupied in reading
              and see that there be no lazy sister
              who spends her time in idleness or gossip
              and does not apply herself to the reading,
              so that she is not only unprofitable to herself
              but also distracts others.
              If such a one be found (which God forbid),
              let her be corrected once and a second time;
              if she does not amend,
              let her undergo the punishment of the Rule
              in such a way that the rest may take warning.

              Moreover, one sister shall not associate with another
              at inappropriate times.

              REFLECTION

              Lectio divina, sacred reading, is the Benedictine form of
              contemplation, more ancient than many later forms.
              Being so ancient, it comes with very few directions. Much
              of its "method" has been developed and handed down by monastics over
              the centuries since St. Benedict. Even in that embellished form, it
              remains a very, very simple and efficient means to contemplative
              prayer. One simply reads Scripture or the Fathers (or Mothers!)
              slowly, reflectively, ruminating (like a cow chewing its cud!) on
              each word and verse. As St. Romuald later observed, one waits like a
              chick for whatever its mother gives it. One does not read to get
              through the book. One reads to see if and when the Holy Spirit calls
              us to higher prayer with a word or phrase that strikes the heart. At
              that point, one should follow one's heart and not worry about
              finishing the page! Cleared for takeoff!

              It is interesting that St. Benedict weaves all these schedules of
              contemplative reading and prayer together with his manual labor
              concerns, without any ado. There's another example of the dignity and
              holiness of work in a Benedictine theology. Our work, too, is prayer.
              It must be. We must, somehow, learn to be all prayer. That same
              ruminative mindfulness that colors our lectio must color our labor as
              well. It is a different form of attention, a different form of
              prayer, but it is prayer nonetheless! Just ask any gardener or cook
              with a mystical heart or, for that matter, any toilet cleaner or
              diaper changer of the same ilk!

              The Carmelites prescribe mental prayer, which should, with
              recollection, spread throughout one's day. The hesychasts of Mount
              Athos, Romania and Russia stress the Jesus Prayer, said vocally until
              it becomes automatic in the heart at all times. Both of these are
              more explicit methodologies, but the Benedictine aim is the same:
              prayer without ceasing, prayer in choir and garden and cell, prayer
              at reading and prayer at work. Mindfulness of God at all times is the
              contemplative goal of all these systems.

              This is just my own opinion, but I am inclined to think that the
              Dominican concept of contemplation comes closest to our own, largely
              because of their love of study. Study, for the Dominican, is often
              very similar to lectio in the Benedictine scheme of things. Why?
              Because the Dominican seeks Truth, and Jesus said: "I am the Truth."
              A Dominican could be reading just about anything and still know that every
              bit of real, objective truth garnered from that reading would be yet
              another shard, no matter how small, in the infinite mosaic of the
              face of Christ. That is a mosaic none of us shall ever complete in
              this life, but oh, how much more familiar He shall seem to us when we
              meet Him because of it!

              Maybe I'm just prejudiced, but I think that a Dominican education,
              such as I had, is a wonderful preparation for Benedictine life. Prayers,
              please, for all the Dominicans, especially those who taught me.

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA

               

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