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Holy Rule for Mar. 25

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX A Blessed Solemnity of the Annunciation to all! Prayers, please, for Fred, 43, brain tumor, and for his wife, Linda. They are trying to get specialist
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 25 4:28 AM
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      +PAX

      A Blessed Solemnity of the Annunciation to all! Prayers, please, for Fred, 43, brain tumor, and for his wife, Linda. They are trying to get specialist care in another city to treat him, prayers, too, for Willow, 29, cancer in both kidneys. Needs a transplant to survive to 30 in June, but way down on the list. Prayers for Shirley, recurrent abdominal pain, hopefully not pancreatitis, for Liz, shoulder and arm pain, and for Fr. Brendan-Benedict, who got a very troubling diagnosis recently. Prayers of thanksgiving for Mary, Elaine's Mother, she is doing well, but osteoporosis still afflicts her spine. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. Thanks so much! JL

      March 25, July 25, November 24
      Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

      When anyone has made a mistake
      while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
      an antiphon or a lesson,
      if he does not humble himself there before all
      by making a satisfaction,
      let him undergo a greater punishment
      because he would not correct by humility
      what he did wrong through carelessness.

      But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

      REFLECTION

      Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
      experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
      days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
      whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not get so
      mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how terribly recent some
      of them are. (Just try to breathe normally... paramedics will be here
      any minute now. Maybe we can get that dosage adjusted and you won't
      have these terrible fugues anymore, hmmm? LOL!)

      As I mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center when
      late for choir or table, then bow to the superior and go to our
      place. We also kneel when we make audible mistakes in Church. And
      yes, those things, as I pointed out yesterday, can be very useful.

      But most Oblates do not have a refectory or choir to kneel in, so
      what's here for the majority of us? The grace of humility, without
      which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
      home would be unlivable. Check out some of the lyrics of Shaker
      hymns, other than the famous "'Tis a Gift to Be Simple." They feature
      LOADS of messages about getting along without murder. One speaks of
      not being stubborn like the oak, but of being like the willow who can
      bend!

      Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
      share of strays, losers and crosses. Every one without fail
      will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. Our job
      is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part of the
      problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
      we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
      quickly as we can.

      If you can't say "I'm sorry.", for God's sake- quite literally- start
      practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
      tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
      perfect,) substitutes, like "Forgive me," or "It was my fault." Work
      on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
      that's OK,". Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
      shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
      of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
      minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
      produce them.

      Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
      from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
      that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
      apology, why not try a bit of self-interview. WHY do these things or
      persons upset you so? What do you have in common with those who annoy
      you most? Most important, just who the heck ARE you that your
      perceived slights are such a big deal? Try reminding yourself that He
      is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these points may be a
      big and promising start.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Particular prayers, please, for Terry Schiavo and for her happy death. As we fast or suffer any hunger or thirst, let us recall that she has had nothing
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 25 5:10 AM
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        +PAX

        Particular prayers, please, for Terry Schiavo and for her happy death. As we fast or suffer any hunger or thirst, let us recall that she has had nothing at all, food or water, since last Friday. We know with certainty nothing about how much of this she understands nor of how much pain she feels. Only she and God know. On Good Friday, when Jesus called from the Cross, "I thirst!" let us remember Terry, dying of starvation and thirst in the wealthy and technologically advanced nation that is, sadly in this instance, the United States.

        Prayers, too, for Barbara, spreading inoperable kidney cancer, and for Mary, her daughter and all their family. Prayer for Amy, eating disorder and depression, also for a successful family visit. Deo gratias, Edna, suicidal, for whom we prayed, seems to be doing better. Prayers for John, who attempted suicide and for his parents, and for Janine, pregnant after having had 4 miscarriages. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

        March 25, July 25, November 24
        Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

        When anyone has made a mistake
        while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
        an antiphon or a lesson,
        if he does not humble himself there before all
        by making a satisfaction,
        let him undergo a greater punishment
        because he would not correct by humility
        what he did wrong through carelessness.

        But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

        REFLECTION

        Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
        experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
        days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
        whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not get so
        mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how terribly recent
        some of them are. (Just try to breathe normally... paramedics will be here
        any minute now. Maybe we can get that dosage adjusted and you won't
        have these terrible fugues anymore, hmmm? LOL!)

        As I mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center when
        late for choir or table, then bow to the superior and go to our
        place. We also kneel when we make audible mistakes in Church. And
        yes, those things can be very useful.

        But most Oblates do not have a refectory or choir to kneel in, so
        what's here for the majority of us? The grace of humility, without
        which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
        home would be unlivable. Check out some of the lyrics of Shaker
        hymns, other than the famous "'Tis a Gift to Be Simple." They feature
        LOADS of messages about getting along without murder. One speaks of
        not being stubborn like the oak, but of being like the willow who can
        bend!

        Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
        share of strays, bumblers and crosses. Every one without fail
        will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. Our job
        is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part of the
        problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
        we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
        quickly as we can.

        If you can't say "I'm sorry.", for God's sake- quite literally- start
        practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
        tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
        perfect,) substitutes, like "Forgive me," or "It was my fault." Work
        on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
        that's OK,".

        Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
        shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
        of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
        minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
        produce them.

        Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
        from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
        that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
        apology, why not try a bit of self-interview?

        WHY do these things or persons upset you so? What do you have in
        common with those who annoy you most? Most important, just who the
        heck ARE you that your perceived slights are such a big deal? Try reminding
        yourself that He is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these points
        may be a big and promising start.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX A blessed Solemnity of the Annunciation to all! A thought to ponder: St. Bonaventure and the Franciscans taught that, even had Adam not fallen, even
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 25 5:20 AM
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          +PAX

          A blessed Solemnity of the Annunciation to all! A thought to ponder: St. Bonaventure and the Franciscans taught that, even had Adam not fallen, even without original sin, Jesus still would have become Incarnate, purely out of love for humanity. Interesting perspective there!

          Prayers, please, for Mike and his Mom, Bev, she is in her 80's and suffering from a blood disease, though not leukemia, Deo gratias! Prayers for Pam, lingering pneumonia and now having to change doctors, also for Louise, 44, mother of a young family, who suffered a small stroke. Prayers for discernment for Allison, trying to find where God wants her in this life. Prayers for Greg and his Mom. He is seriously ill and diagnosis has so far been impossible. For his worried Mom and his doctors, and all the doctors who treat us. Prayers for Fr. Greg and his son, Ryan, who suffered several injuries in an accident. Prayers for newborn and soon to be baptized Eva, and her parents, Courtney and Don. Also for Savannah, about to be baptized and her Dad, David. Prayers for continued recovery of Bob and for his wife, Rosemary. For the happy death and eternal rest of Sr. M. Isaac Jogues, her great niece, Trish, and all their family who mourn her. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 25, July 25, November 24
          Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

          When anyone has made a mistake
          while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
          an antiphon or a lesson,
          if he does not humble himself there before all
          by making a satisfaction,
          let him undergo a greater punishment
          because he would not correct by humility
          what he did wrong through carelessness.

          But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

          REFLECTION

          Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
          experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
          days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
          whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not get so
          mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how terribly recent
          some of them are. (Just try to breathe normally... paramedics will be here
          any minute now. Maybe we can get that dosage adjusted and you won't
          have these terrible fugues anymore, hmmm? LOL!)

          As I mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center when
          late for choir, then bow to the superior and go to our place. We also bow
          to the superior when late to table. We kneel when we make audible
          mistakes in Church. And yes, those things can be very useful.

          But most Oblates do not have a refectory or choir to kneel in, so
          what's here for the majority of us? The grace of humility, without
          which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
          home would be unlivable. Check out some of the lyrics of Shaker
          hymns, other than the famous "'Tis a Gift to Be Simple." They feature
          LOADS of messages about getting along without murder. One speaks of
          not being stubborn like the oak, but of being like the willow who can bend!

          Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
          share of strays, fumblers and crosses. Every one without fail
          will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. Our job
          is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part of the
          problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
          we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
          quickly as we can.

          If you can't say "I'm sorry.", for God's sake- quite literally- start
          practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
          tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
          perfect,) substitutes, like "Forgive me," or "It was my fault." Work
          on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
          that's OK,".

          Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
          shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
          of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
          minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
          produce them.

          Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
          from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
          that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
          apology, why not try a bit of self-interview?

          Why do these things or persons upset you so? What do you have in
          common with those who annoy you most? Most important, just who are
          you that your perceived slights are such a big deal? Try reminding
          yourself that He is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these points
          may be a big and promising start.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Shannon Marie, for her Mom, for all her family, and for all who mourn her. Prayers for Katelyn, a
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 24 7:21 PM
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            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Shannon Marie, for
            her Mom, for all her family, and for all who mourn her. Prayers for Katelyn, a
            5 year old girl and her Dad. She has lost her mother and her twin sister
            and is suffering now with the cancer that her twin died from. Prayers for
            Linda, 60, she has an abdominal mass which has spread to her liver and kidney and
            might also involve her upper stomach. She is having a biopsy on April 3rd.
            Prayers for Merilyne and Andrew, they had problems conceiving before the
            birth of their son, Caleb. Merilyne is once again pregnant but is having
            worrying problems at eight weeks, they are a Christain family and are praying and
            trying to keep calm, but prayers are most welcome!

            Prayers for Catherine, a survivor of driving drunk, acknowledging the way
            that alcoholism has controlled her life, working on recovery one day at a time.
            Prayers for all those struggling with addiction and for all those treating
            and caring for them and for all our prayer folks. Prayers for all the newly
            confirmed at St. Bede's parish. Prayers for Jim, who died Mar. 23 from cancer,
            for his happy death and eternal rest, for his wife and for all his family and
            those who mourn him. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is
            best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much.
            JL

            March 25, July 25, November 24
            Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

            When anyone has made a mistake
            while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
            an antiphon or a lesson,
            if he does not humble himself there before all
            by making a satisfaction,
            let him undergo a greater punishment
            because he would not correct by humility
            what he did wrong through carelessness.

            But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

            REFLECTION

            Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
            experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
            days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
            whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not get so
            mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how terribly recent
            some of them are. (Just try to breathe normally... paramedics will be here
            any minute now. Maybe we can get that dosage adjusted and you won't
            have these terrible fugues anymore, hmmm? LOL!)

            As I mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center when
            late for choir, then bow to the superior and go to our place. We also bow
            to the superior when late to table. We kneel when we make audible
            mistakes in Church. And yes, those things can be very useful.

            But most Oblates do not have a refectory or choir to kneel in, so
            what's here for the majority of us? The grace of humility, without
            which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
            home would be unlivable. Check out some of the lyrics of Shaker
            hymns, other than the famous "'Tis a Gift to Be Simple." They feature
            LOADS of messages about getting along with others. One speaks of
            not being stubborn like the oak, but of being like the willow who can bend!

            Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
            share of strays, fumblers and crosses. Every one without fail
            will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. Our job
            is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part of the
            problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
            we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
            quickly as we can.

            If you can't say "I'm sorry.", for God's sake- quite literally- start
            practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
            tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
            perfect,) substitutes, like "Forgive me," or "It was my fault." Work
            on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
            that's OK,".

            Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
            shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
            of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
            minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
            produce them.

            Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
            from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
            that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
            apology, why not try a bit of self-interview?

            Why do these things or persons upset you so? What do you have in
            common with those who annoy you most? Most important, just who are
            you that your perceived slights are such a big deal? Try reminding
            yourself that He is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these points
            may be a big and promising start.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA






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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers please for David, who died suddenly last week. Prayers for his happy death and eternal rest and for his family going thru this difficult time.
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 24 6:16 AM
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              +PAX

              Prayers please for David, who died suddenly last week.
              Prayers for his happy death and eternal rest and for his family going thru this difficult
              time.

              Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of J. S.

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is
              best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much.
              JL

              March 25, July 25, November 24
              Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

              When anyone has made a mistake
              while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
              an antiphon or a lesson,
              if he does not humble himself there before all
              by making a satisfaction,
              let him undergo a greater punishment
              because he would not correct by humility
              what he did wrong through carelessness.

              But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

              REFLECTION

              Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
              experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
              days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
              whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not get so
              mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how terribly recent
              some of them are. (Just try to breathe normally... paramedics will be here
              any minute now. Maybe we can get that dosage adjusted and you won't
              have these terrible fugues anymore, hmmm? LOL!)

              As I mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center when
              late for choir, then bow to the superior and go to our place. We also bow
              to the superior when late to table. We kneel when we make audible
              mistakes in Church. And yes, those things can be very useful.

              But most Oblates do not have a refectory or choir to kneel in, so
              what's here for the majority of us? The grace of humility, without
              which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
              home would be unlivable. Check out some of the lyrics of Shaker
              hymns, other than the famous "'Tis a Gift to Be Simple." They feature
              LOADS of messages about getting along with others. One speaks of
              not being stubborn like the oak, but of being like the willow who can bend!

              Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
              share of strays, fumblers and crosses. Every one without fail
              will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. Our job
              is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part of the
              problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
              we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
              quickly as we can.

              If you can't say "I'm sorry.", for God's sake- quite literally- start
              practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
              tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
              perfect,) substitutes, like "Forgive me," or "It was my fault." Work
              on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
              that's OK,".

              Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
              shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
              of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
              minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
              produce them.

              Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
              from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
              that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
              apology, why not try a bit of self-interview?

              Why do these things or persons upset you so? What do you have in
              common with those who annoy you most? Most important, just who are
              you that your perceived slights are such a big deal? Try reminding
              yourself that He is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these points
              may be a big and promising start.

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/
              Petersham, MA










              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Br. Jerome Leo
              I hit send by accident, here is the reading and reflection. JL Lord, help us all as You know and will. God s will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 24 9:22 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                I hit send by accident, here is the reading and reflection. JL

                Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is
                best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much.
                JL

                March 25, July 25, November 24
                Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

                When anyone has made a mistake
                while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
                an antiphon or a lesson,
                if he does not humble himself there before all
                by making a satisfaction,
                let him undergo a greater punishment
                because he would not correct by humility
                what he did wrong through carelessness.

                But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

                REFLECTION

                Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
                experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
                days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
                whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not get so
                mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how terribly recent
                some of them are. (Just try to breathe normally... paramedics will be here
                any minute now. Maybe we can get that dosage adjusted and you won't
                have these terrible fugues anymore, hmmm? LOL!)

                As I mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center when
                late for choir, then bow to the superior and go to our place. We also bow
                to the superior when late to table. We kneel when we make audible
                mistakes in Church. And yes, those things can be very useful.

                But most Oblates do not have a refectory or choir to kneel in, so
                what's here for the majority of us? The grace of humility, without
                which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
                home would be unlivable. Check out some of the lyrics of Shaker
                hymns, other than the famous "'Tis a Gift to Be Simple." They feature
                LOADS of messages about getting along with others. One speaks of
                not being stubborn like the oak, but of being like the willow who can bend!

                Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
                share of strays, fumblers and crosses. Every one without fail
                will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. Our job
                is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part of the
                problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
                we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
                quickly as we can.

                If you can't say "I'm sorry.", start
                practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
                tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
                perfect,) substitutes, like "Forgive me," or "It was my fault." Work
                on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
                that's OK,".

                Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
                shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
                of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
                minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
                produce them.

                Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
                from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
                that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
                apology, why not try a bit of self-interview?

                Why do these things or persons upset you so? What do you have in
                common with those who annoy you most? Most important, just who are
                you that your perceived slights are such a big deal? Try reminding
                yourself that He is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these points
                may be a big and promising start.

                Love and prayers,
                Jerome, OSB
                http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/
                Petersham, MA


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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