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Holy Rule for Mar. 20

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers of thanksgiving and blessing for Bill Hayes, one of our Oblates, who turns 91 today. Happy Birthday, Bill!! Prayers of thanksgiving, too, for
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 20, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers of thanksgiving and blessing for Bill Hayes, one of our Oblates, who turns 91 today. Happy Birthday, Bill!! Prayers of thanksgiving, too, for Martha, the kidney transplant patient we prayed for. She is doing well. Continued prayers, please, for Mary, 10 wks., glaucoma surgery, and for Anna, terminal cancer. Thanks so much. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace! JL

      March 20, July 20, November 19
      Chapter 41: At What Hours the Meals Should Be Taken

      From holy Easter until Pentecost
      let the brothers take dinner at the sixth hour
      and supper in the evening.


      From Pentecost throughout the summer,
      unless the monks have work in the fields
      let them fast on Wednesdays and Fridays until the ninth hour;
      on the other days let them dine at the sixth hour.
      This dinner at the sixth hour shall be the daily schedule
      if they have work in the fields
      or the heat of summer is extreme;
      the Abbot's foresight shall decide on this.


      Thus it is that he should adapt and arrange everything
      in such a way that souls may be saved
      and that the brethren may do their work
      without just cause for murmuring.


      From the Ides of September until the beginning of Lent
      let them always take their dinner at the ninth hour.


      In Lent until Easter let them dine in the evening.
      But this evening hour shall be so determined
      that they will not need the light of a lamp while eating,
      Indeed at all seasons
      let the hour, whether for supper or for dinner, be so arranged
      that everything will be done by daylight.

      REFLECTION

      While I wrote this largely about the US, it is, in many points, very
      easily applied to the developed world in general. I am trying
      to become more and more conscious of my international audience!

      In the US, we can be so glutted with food. Far from want, we are
      surrounded, even bombarded with plenty- and not all of it that
      nourishing! Consumerist marketing turns things upside down: food
      becomes more or less solely for pleasure, not need.

      It's a fair guess that this attitude to food in the US has influenced
      our attitude to fasting negatively. Now we look on the least thing as
      a dreadful privation, when those of us Roman Catholics over fifty can
      clearly recall meatless Fridays every week, all year and fasting from
      midnight for Communion, even if you were only 7 years old!!

      When the US Bishops addressed the issue of Friday abstinence, they
      did not abolish it. They merely said some other form of penance might
      be substituted. Whoops! That got lost in a big hurry. How many of us-
      me included- do something extra on Friday because we do not abstain
      from meat? Might be time to take a really hard look at that.

      As always, Oblates in the world must find ways that they can fast or
      abstain without imposing monastic ways on their non-monastic
      families. However, it is worthy of note that Friday abstinence is of
      the Church, not the Holy Rule and might be safely re-instituted, with
      careful explanation as to WHY we do it, for whole families. The
      meatless idea might be easiest for many, but what if something else
      was done to really set Friday apart? Skip one, just one half-hour TV
      show and you have a slot for a devotional family practice like
      Scripture sharing or the Rosary. Could we imagine just 30 minutes
      once a week of TV gone? Find something that works for you and
      then be faithful to it.

      Our spirits are like our bodies in many respects. If we get soft, we
      get weak, if we get lazy, our energy actually diminishes while our
      total lives suffer from that inactivity. That's why Christian life
      itself, not just monastic life, is a life requiring a fair amount of
      discipline, of pushing oneself, of self-denial. Those values still
      exist in the secular world, but are usually only invoked for profit,
      power or sex. See what I mean? We need badly to get our acts together
      in affluent, developed nations.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers of blessings and thanks be to God for Bill Hayes, one of our Oblates, who turns 92 today!! God bless you, Bill! Prayers, too, for his wife, Marje,
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 20, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers of blessings and thanks be to God for Bill Hayes, one of our Oblates, who turns 92 today!! God bless you, Bill! Prayers, too, for his wife, Marje, who remains in a nursing home near their home. Prayers for all whose faith is tested and that all make keep a profitable and grace-filled Holy Week. A blessed Palm Sunday to all! Lord, help them as You know and will. will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! (And today, a Hosanna or two!) Thanks so much! JL

        March 20, July 20, November 19
        Chapter 41: At What Hours the Meals Should Be Taken

        From holy Easter until Pentecost
        let the brothers take dinner at the sixth hour
        and supper in the evening.


        From Pentecost throughout the summer,
        unless the monks have work in the fields
        let them fast on Wednesdays and Fridays until the ninth hour;
        on the other days let them dine at the sixth hour.
        This dinner at the sixth hour shall be the daily schedule
        if they have work in the fields
        or the heat of summer is extreme;
        the Abbot's foresight shall decide on this.


        Thus it is that he should adapt and arrange everything
        in such a way that souls may be saved
        and that the brethren may do their work
        without just cause for murmuring.


        From the Ides of September until the beginning of Lent
        let them always take their dinner at the ninth hour.


        In Lent until Easter let them dine in the evening.
        But this evening hour shall be so determined
        that they will not need the light of a lamp while eating,
        Indeed at all seasons
        let the hour, whether for supper or for dinner, be so arranged
        that everything will be done by daylight.

        REFLECTION

        While I wrote this largely about the US, it is, in many points, very
        easily applied to the developed world in general. I am trying
        to become more and more conscious of my international audience!

        In the US, we can be so glutted with food. Far from want, we are
        surrounded, even bombarded with plenty- and not all of it that
        nourishing! Consumerist marketing turns things upside down: food
        becomes more or less solely for pleasure, not need.

        It's a fair guess that this attitude to food in the US has influenced
        our attitude to fasting negatively. Now we look on the least thing as
        a dreadful privation, when those of us Roman Catholics over fifty can
        clearly recall meatless Fridays every week, all year and fasting from
        midnight on water only for Communion, even if you were just 7 years old!!

        When the US Bishops addressed the issue of Friday abstinence, they
        did not abolish it. They merely said some other form of penance might
        be substituted. Whoops! That got lost in a big hurry. How many of us-
        me included- do something extra on Friday because we do not abstain
        from meat? Might be time to take a really hard look at that.

        As always, Oblates in the world must find ways that they can fast or
        abstain without imposing monastic ways on their non-monastic
        families. However, it is worthy of note that Friday abstinence is of
        the Church, not the Holy Rule and might be safely re-instituted, with
        careful explanation as to WHY we do it, for whole families. The
        meatless idea might be easiest for many, but what if something else
        was done to really set Friday apart? Skip one, just one half-hour TV
        show and you have a slot for a devotional family practice like
        Scripture sharing or the Rosary. Could we imagine just 30 minutes
        once a week of TV gone? Find something that works for you and
        then be faithful to it.

        Our spirits are like our bodies in many respects. If we get soft, we
        get weak, if we get lazy, our energy actually diminishes while our
        total lives suffer from that inactivity. That's why Christian life
        itself, not just monastic life, is a life requiring a fair amount of
        discipline, of pushing oneself, of self-denial. Those values still
        exist in the secular world, but are usually only invoked for profit,
        power or sex. See what I mean? We need badly to get our acts together
        in affluent, developed nations.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX A glorious feastday to Sister Mary Joseph, and all our Josephs! May the transferred solemnity mean an extra day of octave celebrations!! Blessing and
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 20, 2006
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          +PAX

          A glorious feastday to Sister Mary Joseph, and all our Josephs! May the transferred solemnity mean an extra day of "octave" celebrations!! Blessing and graces for all. And blessings and graces for Bill Hayes, one of our Oblates who turns 93 today. Ad multos annos! An anticipated happy birthday to TomKay of Monastic Life list, not 93, but on his way there!! LOL!

          Prayers for Fr. Romuald, in very seriously declining health and possibly near death. Peaceful and serene, he has suffered from cancer for some time and has decided not to pursue further treatments, since all else have failed. Prayers for George, his wife and mother-in-law and all their family. His mother-in-law suffered a serious stroke and is hospitalized. Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias and continued intercession for Sr. Eileen, a CAT scan today may show she does not need surgery after all. Prayers for Charlie, bladder surgery on Mar. 22, and for John, colon surgery today, for his wife, Anne, and all the doctors who treat him and all our prayer intention folks.

          Prayers for Sam, in a coma for 7 weeks since a car accident, for his friends, Tyler, also injured in the accident, and Clint, who was killed. The driver who struck them, Terry, was unhurt, but allegedly had been drinking, so prayers for him, too. Chad, the disabled young man for whom we prayed had a successful pacemaker/defibrillator implant surgery, but now his length recovery may complicate two important activities: his art work, for which he has to lie on his stomach, and swimming, which is the only exercise he has to keep his muscles toned. Prayers for him and his worried Mom, Carol. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him. Thanks so much. JL

          March 20, July 20, November 19
          Chapter 41: At What Hours the Meals Should Be Taken

          From holy Easter until Pentecost
          let the brothers take dinner at the sixth hour
          and supper in the evening.


          From Pentecost throughout the summer,
          unless the monks have work in the fields
          let them fast on Wednesdays and Fridays until the ninth hour;
          on the other days let them dine at the sixth hour.
          This dinner at the sixth hour shall be the daily schedule
          if they have work in the fields
          or the heat of summer is extreme;
          the Abbot's foresight shall decide on this.


          Thus it is that he should adapt and arrange everything
          in such a way that souls may be saved
          and that the brethren may do their work
          without just cause for murmuring.


          From the Ides of September until the beginning of Lent
          let them always take their dinner at the ninth hour.


          In Lent until Easter let them dine in the evening.
          But this evening hour shall be so determined
          that they will not need the light of a lamp while eating,
          Indeed at all seasons
          let the hour, whether for supper or for dinner, be so arranged
          that everything will be done by daylight.

          REFLECTION

          While I wrote this largely about the US, it is, in many points, very
          easily applied to the developed world in general. I am trying
          to become more and more conscious of my international audience!

          In the US, we can be so glutted with food. Far from want, we are
          surrounded, even bombarded with plenty- and not all of it that
          nourishing! Consumerist marketing turns things upside down: food
          becomes more or less solely for pleasure, not need.

          It's a fair guess that this attitude to food in the US has influenced
          our attitude to fasting negatively. Now we look on the least thing as
          a dreadful privation, when those of us Roman Catholics over fifty can
          clearly recall meatless Fridays every week, all year and fasting from
          midnight on water only for Communion, even if you were just 7 years old!!

          When the US Bishops addressed the issue of Friday abstinence, they
          did not abolish it. They merely said some other form of penance might
          be substituted. Whoops! That got lost in a big hurry. How many of us Catholics-
          me included- do something extra on Friday because we do not abstain
          from meat? Might be time to take a really hard look at that.

          As always, Oblates in the world must find ways that they can fast or
          abstain without imposing monastic ways on their non-monastic
          families. However, it is worthy of note that Friday abstinence is of
          the Church, not the Holy Rule and might be safely re-instituted, with
          careful explanation as to WHY we do it, for whole families. The
          meatless idea might be easiest for many, but what if something else
          was done to really set Friday apart? Skip one, just one half-hour TV
          show and you have a slot for a devotional family practice like
          Scripture sharing or the Rosary. Could we imagine just 30 minutes
          once a week of TV gone? Find something that works for you and
          then be faithful to it.

          Our spirits are like our bodies in many respects. If we get soft, we
          get weak, if we get lazy, our energy actually diminishes while our
          total lives suffer from that inactivity. That's why Christian life
          itself, not just monastic life, is a life requiring a fair amount of
          discipline, of pushing oneself, of self-denial. Those values still
          exist in the secular world, but are usually only invoked for profit, fame,
          power or sex. See what I mean? We need badly to get our acts together
          in the affluent, developed nations.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Danielle asks prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for her Dad, who was able to have the shunt put in while she was there and his whole stay was less than
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 19, 2007
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            +PAX

            Danielle asks prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for her Dad, who was able to
            have the shunt put in while she was there and his whole stay was less than
            48 hours. Also fo her Mom, tired, but her blood count is back to normal and
            arrhythmia meds are working. She thanks all for their prayers for her and her
            kids, too! Prayers for Mike, whose wife Marge died last week, after years of
            dementia from Alzheimer's, for her happy death and eternal rest and for all
            her family. Mike has a hard time showing his emotions, so extra prayers for
            him, as this is a crushing loss for him.

            Prayers please for Margaret, who had a mastectomy. She was given a drug
            which has caused heart damage. Prayers, too, for her husband Jimmy. Prayers for
            Angela, who has terminal cancer, she is in good spirits but would appreciate
            your prayers. Prayers for Allison, in school and discerning a career in social
            work, seeking God's will. Prayers, too, for Leanne, Robert, Morris and Val,
            people running for election to their school board and hoping to make a
            remarkable difference to the school. Prayers for Cheryl, fasting three days this
            week for her troubled marriage and asking prayers from all, also asking that
            any so inclined might fast with her. Prayers for Brian, we have prayed in the
            past for his struggles to regain his job in arbritration. He lost the case and
            his job will not be restored. Prayers for him that he trust God and find
            what God has for him in this difficult time. Lord, help us all as You know and
            will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise
            Him! Thanks so much. JL

            March 20, July 20, November 19
            Chapter 41: At What Hours the Meals Should Be Taken

            From holy Easter until Pentecost
            let the brothers take dinner at the sixth hour
            and supper in the evening.


            From Pentecost throughout the summer,
            unless the monks have work in the fields
            let them fast on Wednesdays and Fridays until the ninth hour;
            on the other days let them dine at the sixth hour.
            This dinner at the sixth hour shall be the daily schedule
            if they have work in the fields
            or the heat of summer is extreme;
            the Abbot's foresight shall decide on this.


            Thus it is that he should adapt and arrange everything
            in such a way that souls may be saved
            and that the brethren may do their work
            without just cause for murmuring.


            From the Ides of September until the beginning of Lent
            let them always take their dinner at the ninth hour.


            In Lent until Easter let them dine in the evening.
            But this evening hour shall be so determined
            that they will not need the light of a lamp while eating,
            Indeed at all seasons
            let the hour, whether for supper or for dinner, be so arranged
            that everything will be done by daylight.

            REFLECTION

            While I wrote this largely about the US, it is, in many points, very
            easily applied to the developed world in general. I am trying
            to become more and more conscious of my international audience!

            In the US, we can be so glutted with food. Far from want, we are
            surrounded, even bombarded with plenty- and not all of it that
            nourishing! Consumerist marketing turns things upside down: food
            becomes more or less solely for pleasure, not need.

            It's a fair guess that this attitude to food in the US has influenced
            our attitude to fasting negatively. Now we look on the least thing as
            a dreadful privation, when those of us Roman Catholics who are over fifty
            can clearly recall meatless Fridays every week, all year and fasting from
            midnight on water only for Communion, even if you were just 7 years old!!

            When the US Bishops addressed the issue of Friday abstinence, they
            did not abolish it. They merely said some other form of penance might
            be substituted. Whoops! That got lost in a big hurry. How many of us
            Catholics-
            me included- do something extra on Friday because we do not abstain
            from meat? Might be time to take a really hard look at that.

            As always, Oblates in the world must find ways that they can fast or
            abstain without imposing monastic ways on their non-monastic
            families. However, it is worthy of note that Friday abstinence is of
            the Church, not the Holy Rule and might be safely re-instituted, with
            careful explanation as to WHY we do it, for whole families. The
            meatless idea might be easiest for many, but what if something else
            was done to really set Friday apart? Skip one, just one half-hour TV
            show and you have a slot for a devotional family practice like
            Scripture sharing or the Rosary. Could we imagine just 30 minutes
            once a week of TV gone? Find something that works for you and
            then be faithful to it.

            Our spirits are like our bodies in many respects. If we get soft, we
            get weak, if we get lazy, our energy actually diminishes while our
            total lives suffer from that inactivity. That's why Christian life
            itself, not just monastic life, is a life requiring a fair amount of
            discipline, of pushing oneself, of self-denial. Those values still
            exist in the secular world, but are usually only invoked for profit, fame,
            power or sex. See what I mean? We need badly to get our acts together
            in the affluent, developed nations.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA





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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Wayne s Dad and Les and Erma, and all who mourn them. Prayers, too, for the spiritual, mental and
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 19, 2008
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              +PAX

              Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Wayne's Dad and Les and Erma, and all who mourn them.

              Prayers, too, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their families and loved ones and those who take care of them:

              a 32 year old mother of three young children (10 year old boy + twin girls, Ava & Mia) who has ended in the hospital (mental problems?). The second time in the last six months. This time the stay is supposed to last at least a month

              George, huge aortic aneurysm near his kidneys to be surgically repaired today, moderate survival risk.

              Brett, a 20 year old college student feels he has nothing to live for. His girlfriend of 2 years just broke up with him. His father had a mental breakdown concerning his job and was just released from the hospital. Please pray that Brett chooses to live and that his counselor is able to help him. Prayers, too, for his girfriend, Sarah, and her family, as this was hard for her and for all of them.

              Heather, 27, recurrence of cancer. Treatment doesn't seem to be working. Miracle needed.

              Braxton, 14, diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma, a type of blood cancer that is more prevalent among children than adults. The good news is that Braxton has a good prognosis. There is a strong likelihood that his cancer will be completely removed within a year. But of course there are no certainties. Prayers, too, for his parents, Beth and David, for the perfect will of God for all in this trying time.

              Lord, help us all as You know and
              will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise
              Him! Thanks so much. JL

              March 20, July 20, November 19
              Chapter 41: At What Hours the Meals Should Be Taken

              From holy Easter until Pentecost
              let the brothers take dinner at the sixth hour
              and supper in the evening.


              From Pentecost throughout the summer,
              unless the monks have work in the fields
              let them fast on Wednesdays and Fridays until the ninth hour;
              on the other days let them dine at the sixth hour.
              This dinner at the sixth hour shall be the daily schedule
              if they have work in the fields
              or the heat of summer is extreme;
              the Abbot's foresight shall decide on this.


              Thus it is that he should adapt and arrange everything
              in such a way that souls may be saved
              and that the brethren may do their work
              without just cause for murmuring.


              From the Ides of September until the beginning of Lent
              let them always take their dinner at the ninth hour.


              In Lent until Easter let them dine in the evening.
              But this evening hour shall be so determined
              that they will not need the light of a lamp while eating,
              Indeed at all seasons
              let the hour, whether for supper or for dinner, be so arranged
              that everything will be done by daylight.

              REFLECTION

              While I wrote this largely about the US, it is, in many points, very
              easily applied to the developed world in general. I am trying
              to become more and more conscious of my international audience!

              In the US, we can be so glutted with food. Far from want, we are
              surrounded, even bombarded with plenty- and not all of it that
              nourishing! Consumerist marketing turns things upside down: food
              becomes more or less solely for pleasure, not need.

              It's a fair guess that this attitude to food in the US has influenced
              our attitude to fasting negatively. Now we look on the least thing as
              a dreadful privation, when those of us Roman Catholics who are over fifty
              can clearly recall meatless Fridays every week, all year and fasting from
              midnight on water only for Communion, even if you were just 7 years old!!

              When the US Bishops addressed the issue of Friday abstinence, they
              did not abolish it. They merely said some other form of penance might
              be substituted. Whoops! That got lost in a big hurry. How many of us
              Catholics- me included- do something extra on Friday because we do not
              abstain from meat? Might be time to take a really hard look at that.

              As always, Oblates in the world must find ways that they can fast or
              abstain without imposing monastic ways on their non-monastic
              families. However, it is worthy of note that Friday abstinence is of
              the Church, not the Holy Rule and might be safely re-instituted, with
              careful explanation as to WHY we do it, for whole families. The
              meatless idea might be easiest for many, but what if something else
              was done to really set Friday apart? Skip one, just one half-hour TV
              show and you have a slot for a devotional family practice like
              Scripture sharing or the Rosary. Could we imagine just 30 minutes
              once a week of TV gone? Find something that works for you and
              then be faithful to it.

              Our spirits are like our bodies in many respects. If we get soft, we
              get weak, if we get lazy, our energy actually diminishes while our
              total lives suffer from that inactivity. That's why Christian life
              itself, not just monastic life, is a life requiring a fair amount of
              discipline, of pushing oneself, of self-denial. Those values still
              exist in the secular world, but are usually only invoked for profit, fame,
              power or sex. See what I mean? We need badly to get our acts together
              in the affluent, developed nations.

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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