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Holy Rule for Mar. 19

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  • russophile2002
    +PAX A blessed Solemnity of St. Joseph to all who are celebrating him today! Prayers especially for Sr. Mary Joseph on her feastday. Prayers, too, for Fr. Paul
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 19, 2004
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      +PAX

      A blessed Solemnity of St. Joseph to all who are celebrating him
      today! Prayers especially for Sr. Mary Joseph on her feastday.
      Prayers, too, for Fr. Paul S., problems after a car accident and
      prostate surgery, and for Mary, a 10 week old child undergoing
      surgery for congenital glaucoma today. Her grandfather literally gave
      us our new Church. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. Thanks
      so much. JL

      March 19, July 19, November 18
      Chapter 40: On the Measure of Drink

      "Everyone has her own gift from God,
      one in this way and another in that" (1 Cor. 7:7).
      It is therefore with some misgiving
      that we regulate the measure of others' sustenance.
      Nevertheless, keeping in view the needs of the weak,
      we believe that a hemina of wine a day is sufficient for each.
      But those to whom God gives the strength to abstain
      should know that they will receive a special reward.


      If the circumstances of the place,
      or the work
      or the heat of summer
      require a greater measure,
      the superior shall use her judgment in the matter,
      taking care always
      that there be no occasion for surfeit or drunkenness.
      We read
      it is true,
      that wine is by no means a drink for monastics;
      but since the monastics of our day cannot be persuaded of this
      let us at least agree to drink sparingly and not to satiety,
      because "wine makes even the wise fall away" (Eccles. 19:2).


      But where the circumstances of the place are such
      that not even the measure prescribed above can be supplied,
      but much less or none at all,
      let those who live there bless God and not murmur.
      Above all things do we give this admonition,
      that they abstain from murmuring.

      REFLECTION

      Two things stand out here: the gentleness of St. Benedict and the
      necessity of praise in every circumstance.

      St. Benedict admits he is hesitant to set forth a principle of how
      much others he will never know might need for their sustenance. He
      may not have seen just how many other people and lands and times he
      was writing for, but he did see enough to be uneasy. This is not the
      voice or tone of a relentless dictator whose undue hunger for control
      finds his finger in every pie. This is a father who knows an
      important fact: father may very well NOT always know best! Gentleness
      and humility are two of the finest gems in any crown of authority.

      Every bit as important, but hidden and even lost amidst worries about
      how much a hemina is in metric, is the wonderful injunction that
      those who lack must praise. However much we have of any good thing,
      is from God, not ourselves. How little we have may very well have
      nothing to do with God at all. Even if it does, even if He wills
      straitened times and tightened belts for our good and growth, we must
      bless Him and not murmur.

      Look back at the Instruments of Good Works in Chapter 4 and the Steps
      of Humility in Chapter 7 and you will find in both a statement of
      this same principle. The monastic is not to complain or murmur, but
      to be happy- even thankful!- for whatever is received. That gratitude
      and joy is essential because everything that is received is a gift
      from God. Everything. Realizing that is a tremendously important
      piece of the puzzle in our monastic searching and striving.

      As Christians and monastics, we have to check murmuring in ourselves,
      but in others as well. Few like to do the latter, since issues of
      human respect come into play and nobody wants to be thought THAT much
      of a goody-goody. With skill and timing, however, one can learn to
      stop murmuring, to sway the topic, to correct the offender without
      making them feel like slime.

      Sometimes it can be as simple as a gentle and cheerful assumption of
      the opposite position. And there is always the old standby, said
      kindly: "Oh, I don't know..." That's the whole secret of fraternal
      correction: it cannot make the other feel less than they are, nor can
      it make the one offering it proud! Corrections without love, in which
      our own self-interests are entangled, our own agendas foremost,
      usually should not be given.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX A blessed solemnity of St. Joseph to all! Prayers, please, for Michelle, home from hospice and approaching death, for two priests with addiction problems,
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 19, 2005
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        +PAX

        A blessed solemnity of St. Joseph to all!

        Prayers, please, for Michelle, home from hospice and approaching death, for two priests with addiction problems, for Mary, valve replacement and double bypass surgery this Tuesday, for her daughter, Louise, and all her family. Prayers for Elizabeth and Danielle, making their final Oblation today. Prayers for a priest considering monastic profession, and also for him and his group of college students going to Guatemala for 8 days later this month to work in an orphanage there. Prayers for Chris and his recovery, also for someone who has a difficult anniversary to face on Monday. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much! JL

        March 19, July 19, November 18
        Chapter 40: On the Measure of Drink

        "Everyone has her own gift from God,
        one in this way and another in that" (1 Cor. 7:7).
        It is therefore with some misgiving
        that we regulate the measure of others' sustenance.
        Nevertheless, keeping in view the needs of the weak,
        we believe that a hemina of wine a day is sufficient for each.
        But those to whom God gives the strength to abstain
        should know that they will receive a special reward.


        If the circumstances of the place,
        or the work
        or the heat of summer
        require a greater measure,
        the superior shall use her judgment in the matter,
        taking care always
        that there be no occasion for surfeit or drunkenness.
        We read
        it is true,
        that wine is by no means a drink for monastics;
        but since the monastics of our day cannot be persuaded of this
        let us at least agree to drink sparingly and not to satiety,
        because "wine makes even the wise fall away" (Eccles. 19:2).


        But where the circumstances of the place are such
        that not even the measure prescribed above can be supplied,
        but much less or none at all,
        let those who live there bless God and not murmur.
        Above all things do we give this admonition,
        that they abstain from murmuring.

        REFLECTION

        Two things stand out here: the gentleness of St. Benedict and the
        necessity of praising God in every circumstance.

        St. Benedict admits he is hesitant to set forth a principle of how
        much others he will never know might need for their sustenance. He
        may not have seen just how many other people and lands and times he
        was writing for, but he did see enough to be uneasy. This is not the
        voice or tone of a relentless dictator whose undue hunger for control
        finds his finger in every pie. This is a father who knows an
        important fact: father may very well NOT always know best! Gentleness
        and humility are two of the finest gems in any crown of authority.

        Every bit as important, but hidden and even lost amidst worries about
        how much a hemina is in metric, is the wonderful injunction that
        those who lack must praise. However much we have of any good thing,
        it is from God, not ourselves. How little we have may very well have
        nothing to do with God at all. Even if it does, even if He wills
        straitened times and tightened belts for our good and growth, we must
        bless Him and not murmur or gripe.

        Look back at the Instruments of Good Works in Chapter 4 and the Steps
        of Humility in Chapter 7 and you will find in both a statement of
        this same principle. The monastic is not to complain or murmur, but
        to be happy- even thankful!- for whatever is received. That gratitude
        and joy is essential because everything that is received is a gift
        from God. Everything. Realizing that is a tremendously important
        piece of the puzzle in our monastic searching and striving.

        As Christians and monastics, we have to check murmuring in ourselves,
        but in others as well. Few like to do the latter, since issues of
        human respect come into play and nobody wants to be thought THAT much
        of a goody-goody. With skill and timing, however, one can learn to
        stop murmuring, to sway the topic, to correct the offender without
        making them feel like slime.

        Sometimes it can be as simple as a gentle and cheerful assumption of
        the opposite position. And there is always the old standby, said
        kindly, with a shrug: "Oh, I don't know..." That's the whole secret of fraternal
        correction: it cannot make the other feel less than they are, nor can
        it make the one offering it proud! Corrections without love, in which
        our own self-interests are entangled, our own agendas foremost,
        usually should not be given. The Desert Fathers taught that no fraternal
        correction should be given unless we were sure selfish motive was not involved,
        not a bad idea at all!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX Prayers, please, for Robert, Sr. Lany Jo s Dad, who died Friday evening. For his happy death and eternal rest and for all his family. Special prayers for
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 19, 2006
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          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for Robert, Sr. Lany Jo's Dad, who died Friday evening. For his happy death and eternal rest and for all his family. Special prayers for Sr. Lany Jo, as this has been a long and draining time for her. FL requires a 7 day waiting period before cremation, so she will not be able to stay down there for the interment of ashes, but they are having a memorial Mass on Tuesday, the feast of St. Benedict, so special prayers for them all that our holy Father Benedict will look out for them and that he was there to grant Robert a happy death. Just before Robert's death, the family received word that his 20 yr. old grandson, Jameson, was wounded in Iraq, one leg broken and the other riddled with shrapnel, so prayers for him and his recovery. Alas, this does not mean he's coming home: the Army apparently plans to put him back in the field when recovered.

          Prayers of Deo gratias and thanks for Anastasia, the psychiatrically troubled teen for whom we prayed. Her court date went well and she is starting a new job. Prayers, too, for her parents and her sibling, Kaitlin, in grad school and Mark, who worries his parents with plans to join the Marines after high school. Prayers for Fr. Romuald, taken to the hospital with breathing problems, and for a priest with follicular lymphoma. Continued prayers for Sr. Eileen, who developed a lung infection in CU and will need further surgery for that. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 19, July 19, November 18
          Chapter 40: On the Measure of Drink

          "Everyone has her own gift from God,
          one in this way and another in that" (1 Cor. 7:7).
          It is therefore with some misgiving
          that we regulate the measure of others' sustenance.
          Nevertheless, keeping in view the needs of the weak,
          we believe that a hemina of wine a day is sufficient for each.
          But those to whom God gives the strength to abstain
          should know that they will receive a special reward.


          If the circumstances of the place,
          or the work
          or the heat of summer
          require a greater measure,
          the superior shall use her judgment in the matter,
          taking care always
          that there be no occasion for surfeit or drunkenness.
          We read
          it is true,
          that wine is by no means a drink for monastics;
          but since the monastics of our day cannot be persuaded of this
          let us at least agree to drink sparingly and not to satiety,
          because "wine makes even the wise fall away" (Eccles. 19:2).


          But where the circumstances of the place are such
          that not even the measure prescribed above can be supplied,
          but much less or none at all,
          let those who live there bless God and not murmur.
          Above all things do we give this admonition,
          that they abstain from murmuring.

          REFLECTION

          Two things stand out here: the gentleness of St. Benedict and the
          necessity of praising God in every circumstance.

          St. Benedict admits he is hesitant to set forth a principle of how
          much others he will never know might need for their sustenance. He
          may not have seen just how many other people and lands and times he
          was writing for, but he did see enough to be uneasy. This is not the
          voice or tone of a relentless dictator whose undue hunger for control
          finds his finger in every pie. This is a father who knows an
          important fact: father may very well NOT always know best! Gentleness
          and humility are two of the finest gems in any crown of authority.

          Every bit as important, but hidden and even lost amidst worries about
          how much a hemina is in metric, is the wonderful injunction that
          those who lack must praise. However much we have of any good thing,
          it is from God, not ourselves. How little we have may very well have
          nothing to do with God at all.

          Even if it does, even if He wills straitened times and tightened belts for
          our good and growth, we must bless Him and not murmur or gripe. I can
          assure you that, if I had all I wanted at earlier periods in my life, there is
          very little chance I would be a monk and no chance at all that I would be
          the person I am today. God used all those "lacks" as riches, as tools of most
          exquisite precision. He knew what He was doing, I did not!

          Look back at the Instruments of Good Works in Chapter 4 and the Steps
          of Humility in Chapter 7 and you will find in both a statement of
          this same principle. The monastic is not to complain or murmur, but
          to be happy- even thankful!- for whatever is received. That gratitude
          and joy is essential because everything that is received is a gift
          from God. Everything. Realizing that is a tremendously important
          piece of the puzzle in our monastic searching and striving.

          As Christians and monastics, we have to check murmuring in ourselves,
          but in others as well. Few like to do the latter, since issues of
          human respect come into play and nobody wants to be thought THAT much
          of a goody-goody. With skill and timing, however, one can learn to
          stop murmuring, to sway the topic, to correct the offender without
          making them feel like slime.

          Sometimes it can be as simple as a gentle and cheerful assumption of
          the opposite position. And there is always the old standby, said
          kindly, with a shrug: "Oh, I don't know..." That's the whole secret of fraternal
          correction: it cannot make the other feel less than they are, nor can
          it make the one offering it proud! Corrections without love, in which
          our own self-interests are entangled, our own agendas foremost,
          usually should not be given.

          The Desert Fathers taught that no fraternal correction should be given unless
          we were sure selfish motive was not involved, not a bad idea at all! There are
          surely cases or real spiritual peril, of grace sin in which corrections must be given.
          Even then, there are time when we are not the ones who should do so. Perhaps
          we can arrange for another who may be better heard to do so, but there are times
          when we would not only not be heard, but may even provoke an obstinate
          persistence in the other person.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX A blessed Solemnity of St. Joseph to all. Special prayers for Sr. Mary Joseph, on her feast day, and for all our Josephs! Graces and blessings galore!
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 18, 2007
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            +PAX

            A blessed Solemnity of St. Joseph to all. Special prayers for Sr. Mary
            Joseph, on her feast day, and for all our Josephs! Graces and blessings galore!
            Prayers for St. Joseph's Hospital and all their patients and staff, and for
            our Trappist brothers at St. Joseph's Abbey, Spencer, Massachusetts.

            Prayers for Fr. Brendan, having a two-day cardiac stress test this week and
            apprehensive about the outcome. Prayers for Neil, just sent over to the Middle
            East. He is a medic and currently awaiting deployment to Iraq, for his
            safety and his family. Prayers for all troops and civilians in harm's way in war
            zones. Please`remember every day to pray for the happy death of so many in
            those war zones whom death snatches away in an instant. Our prayers can fill
            their last moments with grace and help them embrace eternal life and the Divine
            Mercy offered them. Prayers for all the families mourning losses in the war,
            too.

            Prayers for Norman, elderly, congestive heart failure, also for Eddy and
            Tom, both recovering from bypass surgery. Prayers for Ann, having a stent put in
            later this week and very stressed about it. Prayers for her serenity: calm
            patients heal faster! Prayers for David, during his last few months before
            diaconal ordination. Prayers, too, for Sr. Virginia Marie, a elderly nun, who
            has had difficulty with high blood pressure in spite of taking large doses of
            medication to bring it down. She has also had some bleeding and she may have
            to have surgery that may be potential life threatening if her blood pressure
            doesn’t come down. Prayers for an unknown person who threw an empty beer
            bottle through the back window of a car, belonging to Fr. Leo while he was in NY
            on church business.

            Prayers for Peter, who went the extra mile to do something wonderful for his
            wife, Ann, and for Ann, who is so grateful! Prayers for many pet owners,
            worried by a food recall in the US after several cats have died from the foods
            involved. Prayers for one owner, in particular, who is mourning the loss of her
            cat, apparently to this tainted food, she is also nursing her husband, who
            has Alzheimer's, so this is very hard for her. Lord, help us all as You know
            and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
            praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            March 19, July 19, November 18
            Chapter 40: On the Measure of Drink

            "Everyone has her own gift from God,
            one in this way and another in that" (1 Cor. 7:7).
            It is therefore with some misgiving
            that we regulate the measure of others' sustenance.
            Nevertheless, keeping in view the needs of the weak,
            we believe that a hemina of wine a day is sufficient for each.
            But those to whom God gives the strength to abstain
            should know that they will receive a special reward.


            If the circumstances of the place,
            or the work
            or the heat of summer
            require a greater measure,
            the superior shall use her judgment in the matter,
            taking care always
            that there be no occasion for surfeit or drunkenness.
            We read
            it is true,
            that wine is by no means a drink for monastics;
            but since the monastics of our day cannot be persuaded of this
            let us at least agree to drink sparingly and not to satiety,
            because "wine makes even the wise fall away" (Eccles. 19:2).


            But where the circumstances of the place are such
            that not even the measure prescribed above can be supplied,
            but much less or none at all,
            let those who live there bless God and not murmur.
            Above all things do we give this admonition,
            that they abstain from murmuring.

            REFLECTION

            Two things stand out here: the gentleness of St. Benedict and the
            necessity of praising God in every circumstance.

            St. Benedict admits he is hesitant to set forth a principle of how
            much others he will never know might need for their sustenance. He
            may not have seen just how many other people and lands and times he
            was writing for, but he did see enough to be uneasy. This is not the
            voice or tone of a relentless dictator whose undue hunger for control
            finds his finger in every pie. This is a father who knows an
            important fact: father may very well NOT always know best! Gentleness
            and humility are two of the finest gems in any crown of authority.

            Every bit as important, but hidden and even lost amidst worries about
            how much a hemina is in metric, is the wonderful injunction that
            those who lack must praise. However much we have of any good thing,
            it is from God, not ourselves. How little we have may very well have
            nothing to do with God at all.

            Even if it does, even if He wills straitened times and tightened belts for
            our good and growth, we must bless Him and not murmur or gripe. I can
            assure you that, if I had all I wanted at earlier periods in my life, there
            is
            very little chance I would be a monk and no chance at all that I would be
            the person I am today. God used all those "lacks" as riches, as tools of most
            exquisite precision. He knew what He was doing, I did not!

            Look back at the Instruments of Good Works in Chapter 4 and the Steps
            of Humility in Chapter 7 and you will find in both a statement of
            this same principle. The monastic is not to complain or murmur, but
            to be happy- even thankful!- for whatever is received. That gratitude
            and joy is essential because everything that is received is a gift
            from God. Everything. Realizing that is a tremendously important
            piece of the puzzle in our monastic searching and striving.

            As Christians and monastics, we have to check murmuring in ourselves,
            but in others as well. Few like to do the latter, since issues of
            human respect come into play and nobody wants to be thought THAT much
            of a goody-goody. With skill and timing, however, one can learn to
            stop murmuring, to sway the topic, to correct the offender without
            making them feel like slime.

            Sometimes it can be as simple as a gentle and cheerful assumption of
            the opposite position. And there is always the old standby, said
            kindly, with a shrug: "Oh, I don't know..." That's the whole secret of
            fraternal
            correction: it cannot make the other feel less than they are, nor can
            it make the one offering it proud! Corrections without love, in which
            our own self-interests are entangled, our own agendas foremost,
            usually should not be given.

            The Desert Fathers taught that no fraternal correction should be given unless
            we were sure selfish motive was not involved, not a bad idea at all! There
            are
            surely cases or real spiritual peril, of grace sin in which corrections must
            be
            given. Even then, there are time when we are not the ones who should do so.
            Perhaps
            we can arrange for another who may be better heard to do so, but there are
            times
            when we would not only not be heard, but may even provoke an obstinate
            persistence in the other person.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA










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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers for Jim, brand new Oblate novice! Deo Gratias! Lori for whom we prayerd has recovered completely. A miracle. Power of prayer. Family said thanks
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 18, 2008
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              +PAX

              Prayers for Jim, brand new Oblate novice!

              Deo Gratias! Lori for whom we prayerd has recovered completely. A miracle. Power of prayer. Family said thanks for all the prayers. Lori will be checking out tomorrow. Liver looks outstanding-it's a mystery.

              Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical welfare of the following, for all their loved ones and those who treat them:

              Continued prayers for Philip, stroke, making some slow progress.

              Rick, who is at a crossroads in his life and is trying to discern what it is God wants him to do with his life.
              Brooke 12 year old girl who is undergoing test for a leg muscle problem could be serious.

              Jacob a young boy born without a complete digestive tract is having problems and for his family.

              Bill who is recovering from heart surgery.

              For all those celebrating the up coming Holy Week.

              Those making their final oblation this April at BOOC.

              A very personal special intention. Lord, help us all as You know
              and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
              praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              March 19, July 19, November 18
              Chapter 40: On the Measure of Drink

              "Everyone has her own gift from God,
              one in this way and another in that" (1 Cor. 7:7).
              It is therefore with some misgiving
              that we regulate the measure of others' sustenance.
              Nevertheless, keeping in view the needs of the weak,
              we believe that a hemina of wine a day is sufficient for each.
              But those to whom God gives the strength to abstain
              should know that they will receive a special reward.


              If the circumstances of the place,
              or the work
              or the heat of summer
              require a greater measure,
              the superior shall use her judgment in the matter,
              taking care always
              that there be no occasion for surfeit or drunkenness.
              We read
              it is true,
              that wine is by no means a drink for monastics;
              but since the monastics of our day cannot be persuaded of this
              let us at least agree to drink sparingly and not to satiety,
              because "wine makes even the wise fall away" (Eccles. 19:2).


              But where the circumstances of the place are such
              that not even the measure prescribed above can be supplied,
              but much less or none at all,
              let those who live there bless God and not murmur.
              Above all things do we give this admonition,
              that they abstain from murmuring.

              REFLECTION

              Two things stand out here: the gentleness of St. Benedict and the
              necessity of praising God in every circumstance.

              St. Benedict admits he is hesitant to set forth a principle of how
              much others he will never know might need for their sustenance. He
              may not have seen just how many other people and lands and times he
              was writing for, but he did see enough to be uneasy. This is not the
              voice or tone of a relentless dictator whose undue hunger for control
              finds his finger in every pie. This is a father who knows an
              important fact: father may very well NOT always know best! Gentleness
              and humility are two of the finest gems in any crown of authority.

              Every bit as important, but hidden and even lost amidst worries about
              how much a hemina is in metric, is the wonderful injunction that
              those who lack must praise. However much we have of any good thing,
              it is from God, not ourselves. How little we have may very well have
              nothing to do with God at all.

              Even if it does, even if He wills straitened times and tightened belts for
              our good and growth, we must bless Him and not murmur or gripe. I can
              assure you that, if I had all I wanted at earlier periods in my life, there
              is very little chance I would be a monk and no chance at all that I would be
              the person I am today. God used all those "lacks" as riches, as tools of most
              exquisite precision. He knew what He was doing, I did not!

              Look back at the Instruments of Good Works in Chapter 4 and the Steps
              of Humility in Chapter 7 and you will find in both a statement of
              this same principle. The monastic is not to complain or murmur, but
              to be happy- even thankful!- for whatever is received. That gratitude
              and joy is essential because everything that is received is a gift
              from God. Everything. Realizing that is a tremendously important
              piece of the puzzle in our monastic searching and striving.

              As Christians and monastics, we have to check murmuring in ourselves,
              but in others as well. Few like to do the latter, since issues of
              human respect come into play and nobody wants to be thought THAT much
              of a goody-goody. With skill and timing, however, one can learn to
              stop murmuring, to sway the topic, to correct the offender without
              making them feel like slime.

              Sometimes it can be as simple as a gentle and cheerful assumption of
              the opposite position. And there is always the old standby, said
              kindly, with a shrug: "Oh, I don't know..." That's the whole secret of
              fraternal correction: it cannot make the other feel less than they are, nor can
              it make the one offering it proud! Corrections without love, in which
              our own self-interests are entangled, our own agendas foremost,
              usually should not be given.

              The Desert Fathers taught that no fraternal correction should be given unless
              we were sure selfish motive was not involved, not a bad idea at all! There
              are surely cases or real spiritual peril, of grace sin in which corrections must
              be given. Even then, there are time when we are not the ones who should do so.
              Perhaps we can arrange for another who may be better heard to do so, but there are
              times when we would not only not be heard, but may even provoke an obstinate
              persistence in the other person.

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/
              Petersham, MA




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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