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Holy Rule for Mar. 9

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  • russophile2002
    +PAX March 9, July 9, November 8 Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be Above all things let him have humility; and if he has
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 9, 2004
      +PAX

      March 9, July 9, November 8
      Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be

      Above all things let him have humility;
      and if he has nothing else to give
      let him give a good word in answer
      for it is written,
      "A good word is above the best gift" (Eccles. 18:17).


      Let him have under his care
      all that the Abbot has assigned to him,
      but not presume to deal with what he has forbidden him.


      Let him give the brethren their appointed allowance of food
      without any arrogance or delay,
      that they may not be scandalized,
      mindful of the Word of God as to what he deserves
      "who shall scandalize one of the little ones" (Matt 18:6).


      If the community is a large one,
      let helpers be given him,
      that by their assistance
      he may fulfill with a quiet mind the office committed to him.
      The proper times should be observed
      in giving the things that have to be given
      and asking for the things that have to be asked for,
      that no one may be troubled or vexed in the house of God.

      REFLECTION

      Many would shrug at a chapter like this saying: "I'm not cellarer.
      What has that to do with me?" Everything, everything. This chapter,
      like those on the Abbot, is a masterful view of Benedictine authority
      and stewardship in any capacity. We should never presume to usurp
      roles that are not our own, but in covering those roles, the Holy
      Rule again and again gives models to ALL.

      I am guestmaster, not cellarer, but this chapter reminds me that no
      job is an empire, a turf, a personal fiefdom that one administers
      temperamentally and without love. Jobs, for Benedictines in world or
      monastery, are stewardships, not power trips. (At least that OUGHT to
      be true. God save us, it is often otherwise...) If people have to
      become so careful of a given official, wearing kid gloves at every
      possible turn, something is very, very wrong. Now the community is
      reduced to serving the official, when it is supposed to be the other
      way around!

      Of course, the needs of those who come to us at work or at home can
      be overwhelming, even oppressive at times, but we are told not to
      react to those buttons pushed, but to react with love and humility.
      Whatever your job is, the reality is that if there were none with
      needs, you would likely be unemployed. Always remember that. We
      serve, we do not rule. Our call is to forget ourselves in service,
      not to present our intransigent selves to be served.

      Our motto is Peace, because St. Benedict knew how completely
      essential to a fruitful monastic life inner peace was and is. That's
      why he gives this really rather astounding principle: "...no one may
      be troubled or vexed in the house of God." It's God's house, not
      ours. Wake up, folks, if the maid is giving orders tyrannically,
      something's wrong at the manor! It's not her house. It's His.

      A certain amount of vexation is inevitable, and part of the monastic
      struggle and very useful. A chronic, ulcerating source of repeated
      vexation is not. If that comes through an official, something must be
      done. If the numbers are too few to remove the official, then that's
      what the penal code chapters are all about. Cancers, real malignant
      tumors on our peace are meant to be removed. If they are retained by
      a superior's blindness, the superior becomes as harmful as the growth
      itself.

      We may have to endure that, circumstances being what they may
      be, but it is helpful to at least know it is toxic. To blame God's
      will for all this stuff is lunacy. It's a charge He doesn't deserve.
      God's will works around such stuff, in spite of it. He can use it,
      but we must let Him.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, co-patron of Benedictine Oblates to all! Prayers, please, for Ben, 34, the dying young father for whom we prayed,
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 9, 2005
        +PAX

        A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, co-patron of Benedictine Oblates to all!

        Prayers, please, for Ben, 34, the dying young father for whom we prayed, who has gone to God, and especially for his wife and children, his parents and all his family. Continued prayers for D., severe headaches, who has had some improvement, Deo gratias! Also for Patricia, several lumpectomies and now facing a mastectomy with possible spread of the cancer. Lorraine, for whom we have been praying as she gave up her apartment and cats, has slipped into a deep coma and seems near death. Please keep her in ardent prayers- that she accepts God's mercy with all her heart and dies right into His arms. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

        March 9, July 9, November 8
        Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be

        Above all things let him have humility;
        and if he has nothing else to give
        let him give a good word in answer
        for it is written,
        "A good word is above the best gift" (Eccles. 18:17).


        Let him have under his care
        all that the Abbot has assigned to him,
        but not presume to deal with what he has forbidden him.


        Let him give the brethren their appointed allowance of food
        without any arrogance or delay,
        that they may not be scandalized,
        mindful of the Word of God as to what he deserves
        "who shall scandalize one of the little ones" (Matt 18:6).


        If the community is a large one,
        let helpers be given him,
        that by their assistance
        he may fulfill with a quiet mind the office committed to him.
        The proper times should be observed
        in giving the things that have to be given
        and asking for the things that have to be asked for,
        that no one may be troubled or vexed in the house of God.

        REFLECTION

        Many would shrug at a chapter like this saying: "I'm not cellarer.
        What has that to do with me?" Everything, everything. This chapter,
        like those on the Abbot, is a masterful view of Benedictine authority
        and stewardship in any capacity. We should never presume to usurp
        roles that are not our own, but in covering those roles, the Holy
        Rule again and again gives models to ALL.

        I am guestmaster, not cellarer, but this chapter reminds me that no
        job is an empire, a turf, a personal fiefdom that one administers
        temperamentally and without love. Jobs, for Benedictines in world or
        monastery, are stewardships, not power trips. (At least that OUGHT to
        be true. God save us, it is often otherwise...) If people have to
        become so careful of a given official, wearing kid gloves at every
        possible turn, something is very, very wrong. Now the community is
        reduced to serving the official, when it is supposed to be the other
        way around!

        Of course, the needs of those who come to us at work or at home can
        be overwhelming, even oppressive at times, but we are told not to
        react to those buttons pushed, but to react with love and humility.
        Whatever your job is, the reality is that if there were none with
        needs, you would likely be unemployed. Always remember that. We
        serve, we do not rule. Our call is to forget ourselves in service,
        not to present our intransigent selves to be served.

        Our motto is Peace, because St. Benedict knew how completely
        essential to a fruitful monastic life inner peace was and is. That's
        why he gives this really rather astounding principle: "...no one may
        be troubled or vexed in the house of God." It's God's house, not
        ours. Wake up, folks, if the maid is giving orders tyrannically,
        something's wrong at the manor! It's not her house. It's His.

        A certain amount of vexation is inevitable, and part of the monastic
        struggle and very useful. A chronic, ulcerating source of repeated
        vexation is not. If that comes through an official, something must be
        done. If the numbers are too few to remove the official, then that's
        what the penal code chapters are all about. Cancers, real malignant
        tumors on our peace are meant to be removed. If they are retained by
        a superior's blindness, the superior becomes as harmful as the growth
        itself.

        We may have to endure that, circumstances being what they may
        be, but it is helpful to at least know it is toxic. To blame God's
        will for all this stuff is a charge He doesn't deserve. But
        God DOES permit things and He can and does use such things
        to our growth and benefit. God's will works around such stuff, in spite
        of it. He can use it, but we must let Him. He will use the very imperfections
        and even terrors of our situations to make us saints, if we but trust
        Him!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Benedictine Oblates, to all! Prayers, please, for Sr. Lany Jo Smith and her Dad, Robert, who is very
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 9, 2006
          +PAX

          A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Benedictine Oblates, to all!

          Prayers, please, for Sr. Lany Jo Smith and her Dad, Robert, who is very near death, for his wife, Cathy, and all his children. His wife and daughter, both Cathys, have been faithful in caring for him and need a lot of prayers at this time, for strength and grace. Lany Jo and her brother are flying down to Tampa this morning. He could go at any time, but Lany especially wants prayers that he goes in his sleep. For his happy death and eternal rest and for all who are caring for him as he goes to God.

          Prayers for Barbara, flying home today from Florida, for a safe journey, also for Sarah and her family, who have just adopted a new baby girl. Prayers for Barb, leukemia, finished chemo and home, but no white blood cells and fighting a severe sinus problem, possibly an infection. Such things are very risky in the immune-suppressed state after chemo and she is feeling quite poorly. Prayers for Pat, defending her doctoral dissertation and then beginning Oblate formation.

          Prayers for Jim, recurrent skin cancer beneath his left eye, for a successful surgery and recovery. Hopefully that there will be no spreading or complications. Prayers for Ann Marie, suspicious lump on her lower chin, and having to deal with a new health plan which means she lost her former doctor. Prayers for her new doctor and all who care for us and our prayer folk. Prayers for Rose Ann and her friend, Roger, 45, a rare muscle disease has cost him the use of his legs, wheelchair-bound and he has no medical insurance. Prayers for Doug, stressed out at work and hoping to find another less stressful job that will let him do what he loves and still retain his health, for discernment, Providence and God's will. For Bill, elderly, multiple health problems, in severe pain, possibly from cancer, and for his dearest friend, Veronica.

          Deo gratias and thanksgiving for Gina's baby, the little girl with breathing problems for whom we prayed. She is home and doing well. Medicated for now, but prognosis is good. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 9, July 9, November 8
          Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be

          Above all things let him have humility;
          and if he has nothing else to give
          let him give a good word in answer
          for it is written,
          "A good word is above the best gift" (Eccles. 18:17).


          Let him have under his care
          all that the Abbot has assigned to him,
          but not presume to deal with what he has forbidden him.


          Let him give the brethren their appointed allowance of food
          without any arrogance or delay,
          that they may not be scandalized,
          mindful of the Word of God as to what he deserves
          "who shall scandalize one of the little ones" (Matt 18:6).


          If the community is a large one,
          let helpers be given him,
          that by their assistance
          he may fulfill with a quiet mind the office committed to him.
          The proper times should be observed
          in giving the things that have to be given
          and asking for the things that have to be asked for,
          that no one may be troubled or vexed in the house of God.

          REFLECTION

          Many would shrug at a chapter like this saying: "I'm not cellarer.
          What has that to do with me?" Everything, everything. This chapter,
          like those on the Abbot, is a masterful view of Benedictine authority
          and stewardship in any capacity. We should never presume to usurp
          roles that are not our own, but in covering those roles, the Holy
          Rule again and again gives models to ALL.

          I am guestmaster, not cellarer, but this chapter reminds me that no
          job is an empire, a turf, a personal fiefdom that one administers
          temperamentally and without love. Jobs, for Benedictines in world or
          monastery, are stewardships, not power trips. (At least that OUGHT to
          be true. God save us, it is often otherwise...) If people have to
          become so careful of a given official, wearing kid gloves at every
          possible turn, something is very, very wrong. Now the community is
          reduced to serving the official, when it is supposed to be the other
          way around!

          Of course, the needs of those who come to us at work or at home can
          be overwhelming, even oppressive at times, but we are told not to
          react to those buttons pushed, but to react with love and humility.
          Whatever your job is, the reality is that if there were none with
          needs, you would likely be unemployed. Always remember that. We
          serve, we do not rule. Our call is to forget ourselves in service,
          not to present our intransigent selves to be served.

          Our motto is Peace, because St. Benedict knew how completely
          essential to a fruitful monastic life inner peace was and is. That's
          why he gives this really rather astounding principle: "...no one may
          be troubled or vexed in the house of God." It's God's house, not
          ours. Wake up, folks, if the maid is giving orders tyrannically,
          something's wrong at the manor! It's not her house. It's His.

          A certain amount of vexation is inevitable, and part of the monastic
          struggle and very useful. A chronic, ulcerating source of repeated
          vexation is not. If that comes through an official, something must be
          done. If the numbers are too few to remove the official, then that's
          what the penal code chapters are all about. Cancers, real malignant
          tumors on our peace are meant to be removed. If they are retained by
          a superior's blindness, the superior becomes as harmful as the growth
          itself. But even then, God will bring good out of this for those who love
          and trust Him.

          We may have to endure that, circumstances being what they may
          be, but it is helpful to at least know its flaws. To blame God's
          will for all this stuff is not always correct. But God DOES permit things and He
          can and does use such things to our growth and benefit. God's will works
          around such stuff, in spite of it. He can use it, but we must let Him. He will
          use the very imperfections and even terrors of our situations to make us saints,
          if we but trust Him!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Oblates, to all! Prayers, please, for me, as I begin giving my first ever retreat today, and for the
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 8, 2007
            +PAX

            A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Oblates, to all!

            Prayers, please, for me, as I begin giving my first ever retreat today, and
            for the 11 men and women who will be making the retreat, for their safe
            travels here and back, and for the flowering of grace in the hearts of all of us!
            Please pray that I do not get in God's way, but do and say only what He wants
            me to..

            Continued prayers for Tania, as she recovers from eye surgery. Prayers, too,
            for Tim, heart cauterization tomorrow and for his friend, Keith, who is
            worried about him. Prayers for Nick and wife Angie, both elderly, for whom we
            prayed before. Emergency abdominal surgery found a LOT of cancer in Nick. Angie
            is very distraught. More tests needed before treatment can be determined.
            Prayers for Grace, undergoing chemo, also for her husband and children. Many
            prayers, please, for Dillon who is being deployed to Iraq on March 11. Prayers
            also for Eileen who is dealing with some health problems, and for her husband
            and children and extended family as well.

            Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Fr. Pirmin, a young monk
            from Tanzania who was killed in a car accident, and for his community and all
            who mourn him. Prayers, too, for Joan, her husband Pete, and brother Fr. Tom.
            She seems to have had another stroke and is having a difficult time. Prayers
            for the workers in an office with an extremely difficult, suspicious and
            paranoid co-worker, who makes life terribly difficult for all concerned. Prayers
            for them and for her, that God heal this messy situation according to His
            will.

            Prayers for Betty, in the hospital for strep, dehydration, beginning
            pneumonia and then arrhythmia developed. They stabilized her but her WBC count shot
            up. Prayers, too for her husband, Ray, to be admitted to have a shunt put
            in for dialysis, a huge stressor for Betty. Prayers for their daughter,
            Danielle, traveling to be with them and help, and for her six kids and their Dad,
            Thom, who will be caring for them while she is gone. God guard and protect all
            concerned! Continued prayers for Cheryl and her marriage and kids. Lord,
            help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
            God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            March 9, July 9, November 8
            Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be

            Above all things let him have humility;
            and if he has nothing else to give
            let him give a good word in answer
            for it is written,
            "A good word is above the best gift" (Eccles. 18:17).


            Let him have under his care
            all that the Abbot has assigned to him,
            but not presume to deal with what he has forbidden him.


            Let him give the brethren their appointed allowance of food
            without any arrogance or delay,
            that they may not be scandalized,
            mindful of the Word of God as to what he deserves
            "who shall scandalize one of the little ones" (Matt 18:6).


            If the community is a large one,
            let helpers be given him,
            that by their assistance
            he may fulfill with a quiet mind the office committed to him.
            The proper times should be observed
            in giving the things that have to be given
            and asking for the things that have to be asked for,
            that no one may be troubled or vexed in the house of God.

            REFLECTION

            Many would shrug at a chapter like this saying: "I'm not cellarer.
            What has that to do with me?" Everything, everything. This chapter,
            like those on the Abbot, is a masterful view of Benedictine authority
            and stewardship in any capacity. We should never presume to usurp
            roles that are not our own, but in covering those roles, the Holy
            Rule again and again gives models to ALL.

            I am guestmaster, not cellarer, but this chapter reminds me that no
            job is an empire, a turf, a personal fiefdom that one administers
            temperamentally and without love. Jobs, for Benedictines in world or
            monastery, are stewardships, not power trips. (At least that OUGHT to
            be true. God save us, it is often otherwise...) If people have to
            become so careful of a given official, wearing kid gloves at every
            possible turn, something is very, very wrong. Now the community is
            reduced to serving the official, when it is supposed to be the other
            way around!

            Of course, the needs of those who come to us at work or at home can
            be overwhelming, even oppressive at times, but we are told not to
            react to those buttons pushed, but to react with love and humility.
            Whatever your job is, the reality is that if there were none with
            needs, you would likely be unemployed. Always remember that. We
            serve, we do not rule. Our call is to forget ourselves in service,
            not to present our intransigent selves to be served.

            Our motto is Peace, because St. Benedict knew how completely
            essential to a fruitful monastic life inner peace was and is. That's
            why he gives this really rather astounding principle: "...no one may
            be troubled or vexed in the house of God." It's God's house, not
            ours. Wake up, folks, if the maid is giving orders tyrannically,
            something's wrong at the manor! It's not her house. It's His.

            A certain amount of vexation is inevitable, and part of the monastic
            struggle and very useful. A chronic, ulcerating source of repeated
            vexation is not. If that comes through an official, something must be
            done. If the numbers are too few to remove the official, then that's
            what the penal code chapters are all about. Cancers, real malignant
            tumors on our peace are meant to be removed. If they are retained by
            a superior's blindness, the superior becomes as harmful as the growth
            itself. But even then, God will bring good out of this for those who love
            and trust Him.

            We may have to endure that, circumstances being what they may
            be, but it is helpful to at least know its flaws. To blame God's
            will for all this stuff is not always correct. But God DOES permit things
            and He
            can and does use such things to our growth and benefit. God's will works
            around such stuff, in spite of it. He can use it, but we must let Him. He
            will
            use the very imperfections and even terrors of our situations to make us
            saints,
            if we but trust Him!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA



            <BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
            email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
            http://www.aol.com.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Oblates, to all! Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical well-being of the following,
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 8, 2008
              +PAX

              A blessed feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Oblates, to all!

              Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical well-being of the following, for all their loved ones and for all who take care of them:

              Br. Vincent and his Dad and family, especially Vita, his Mom. Cos, his Dad seems to be nearing death and they are trying to arrange hospice care.

              Dave's wife, rheumatoid arthritis, chemo not working as it did formerly and dosages have to be increased, which will suppress her immune system.

              Myles, 80's, who recently had a brain tumor removed and is responding well with treatments so far.

              Pat who is still have problems with irregular blood pressure after her hip surgery.

              Connie Joy who is having problems with severe depression.

              Teenagers who are having problems with drugs and abuse.

              Prayers for all those involved in the International Women's Day of Prayer which was today.

              David, seeemingly close to a dream job being offered him.

              Lord,
              help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
              God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              March 9, July 9, November 8
              Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be

              Above all things let him have humility;
              and if he has nothing else to give
              let him give a good word in answer
              for it is written,
              "A good word is above the best gift" (Eccles. 18:17).


              Let him have under his care
              all that the Abbot has assigned to him,
              but not presume to deal with what he has forbidden him.


              Let him give the brethren their appointed allowance of food
              without any arrogance or delay,
              that they may not be scandalized,
              mindful of the Word of God as to what he deserves
              "who shall scandalize one of the little ones" (Matt 18:6).


              If the community is a large one,
              let helpers be given him,
              that by their assistance
              he may fulfill with a quiet mind the office committed to him.
              The proper times should be observed
              in giving the things that have to be given
              and asking for the things that have to be asked for,
              that no one may be troubled or vexed in the house of God.

              REFLECTION

              Many would shrug at a chapter like this saying: "I'm not cellarer.
              What has that to do with me?" Everything, everything. This chapter,
              like those on the Abbot, is a masterful view of Benedictine authority
              and stewardship in any capacity. We should never presume to usurp
              roles that are not our own, but in covering those roles, the Holy
              Rule again and again gives models to ALL.

              I am guestmaster, not cellarer, but this chapter reminds me that no
              job is an empire, a turf, a personal fiefdom that one administers
              temperamentally and without love. Jobs, for Benedictines in world or
              monastery, are stewardships, not power trips. (At least that OUGHT to
              be true. God save us, it is often otherwise...) If people have to
              become so careful of a given official, wearing kid gloves at every
              possible turn, something is very, very wrong. Now the community is
              reduced to serving the official, when it is supposed to be the other
              way around!

              Of course, the needs of those who come to us at work or at home can
              be overwhelming, even oppressive at times, but we are told not to
              react to those buttons pushed, but to react with love and humility.
              Whatever your job is, the reality is that if there were none with
              needs, you would likely be unemployed. Always remember that. We
              serve, we do not rule. Our call is to forget ourselves in service,
              not to present our intransigent selves to be served.

              Our motto is Peace, because St. Benedict knew how completely
              essential to a fruitful monastic life inner peace was and is. That's
              why he gives this really rather astounding principle: "...no one may
              be troubled or vexed in the house of God." It's God's house, not
              ours. Wake up, folks, if the maid is giving orders tyrannically,
              something's wrong at the manor! It's not her house. It's His.

              A certain amount of vexation is inevitable, and part of the monastic
              struggle and very useful. A chronic, ulcerating source of repeated
              vexation is not. If that comes through an official, something must be
              done. If the numbers are too few to remove the official, then that's
              what the penal code chapters are all about. Cancers, real malignant
              tumors on our peace are meant to be removed. If they are retained by
              a superior's blindness, the superior becomes as harmful as the growth
              itself. But even then, God will bring good out of this for those who love
              and trust Him.

              We may have to endure that, circumstances being what they may
              be, but it is helpful to at least know its flaws. To blame God's
              will for all this stuff is not always correct. But God DOES permit things
              and He
              can and does use such things to our growth and benefit. God's will works
              around such stuff, in spite of it. He can use it, but we must let Him. He
              will
              use the very imperfections and even terrors of our situations to make us
              saints,
              if we but trust Him!

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Br. Jerome Leo
              +PAX Prayers for a blessed Lent for all of our readers, and prayers for all our Oblates on the feast of St. Frances of Rome, their patroness. Prayers for Fr.
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 8, 2016

                +PAX

                 

                Prayers for a blessed Lent for all of our readers, and prayers for all our Oblates on the feast of St. Frances of Rome, their patroness.

                 

                Prayers for Fr. Christopher and his Dad. His Dad had to move into an Alzheimer’s care unit.

                 

                Prayers for Dan, for whom we prayed, have may have pneumonia, after being sent home. He also has fluid on his legs and is in a lot of pain.

                 

                Prayers for Kerrie, thyroid biopsy today and neuromuscular problems affecting her left leg.

                Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                March 9, July 9, November 8
                Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be

                Above all things let him have humility;
                and if he has nothing else to give
                let him give a good word in answer
                for it is written,
                "A good word is above the best gift" (Eccles. 18:17).


                Let him have under his care
                all that the Abbot has assigned to him,
                but not presume to deal with what he has forbidden him.


                Let him give the brethren their appointed allowance of food
                without any arrogance or delay,
                that they may not be scandalized,
                mindful of the Word of God as to what he deserves
                "who shall scandalize one of the little ones" (Matt 18:6).


                If the community is a large one,
                let helpers be given him,
                that by their assistance
                he may fulfill with a quiet mind the office committed to him.
                The proper times should be observed
                in giving the things that have to be given
                and asking for the things that have to be asked for,
                that no one may be troubled or vexed in the house of God.

                REFLECTION

                Many would shrug at a chapter like this saying: "I'm not cellarer.
                What has that to do with me?" Everything, everything. This chapter,
                like those on the Abbot, is a masterful view of Benedictine authority
                and stewardship in any capacity. We should never presume to usurp
                roles that are not our own, but in covering those roles, the Holy
                Rule again and again gives models to ALL.

                I am not cellarer, but this chapter reminds me that no
                job is an empire, a turf, a personal fiefdom that one administers
                temperamentally and without love. Jobs, for Benedictines in world or
                monastery, are stewardships, not power trips. (At least that OUGHT to
                be true. God save us, it is sometimes otherwise...) If people have to
                become so careful of a given official, wearing kid gloves at every
                possible turn, something is very, very wrong. Now the community is
                reduced to serving the official, when it is supposed to be the other
                way around!

                Of course, the needs of those who come to us at work or at home can
                be overwhelming, even oppressive at times, but we are told not to
                react to those buttons pushed, but to react with love and humility.
                Whatever your job is, the reality is that if there were none with
                needs, you would likely be unemployed. Always remember that. We
                serve, we do not rule. Our call is to forget ourselves in service,
                not to present our intransigent selves to be served.

                Our motto is Peace, because St. Benedict knew how completely
                essential to a fruitful monastic life inner peace was and is. That's
                why he gives this really rather astounding principle: "...that no one may
                be troubled or vexed in the house of God." It's God's house, not
                ours. Wake up, folks, if the maid is giving orders tyrannically,
                something's wrong at the manor! It's not her house. It's His.


                Love and prayers,
                Jerome, OSB
                http://www.stmarysmonastery.org

                Petersham, MA

                 

              • russophile2002
                +PAX Prayers for all Oblates on the feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Oblates. Happy feastday to all! Prayers for the eternal rest of a hermit in her
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 8

                  +PAX

                  Prayers for all Oblates on the feast of St. Frances of Rome, patroness of Oblates. Happy feastday to all!

                   

                  Prayers for the eternal rest of a hermit in her 80’s, Sr. Mary Clare, and for all her family, especially her son, Elias, who is very depressed, and for all who mourn her.

                   

                  Prayers for those affected by tornados in Missouri and for all trying to help. Prayers for those who have lost property or been injured, and for the eternal rest of the one man killed, and for any others who may yet be found to have been killed. Prayers for the families of all.

                   

                  Prayers for Ken’s cousin, whose Florida home is threatened by wild fires and for all threatened by those fires.

                  Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                  March 9, July 9, November 8
                  Chapter 31: What Kind of Man the Cellarer of the Monastery Should Be

                  Above all things let him have humility;
                  and if he has nothing else to give
                  let him give a good word in answer
                  for it is written,
                  "A good word is above the best gift" (Eccles. 18:17).


                  Let him have under his care
                  all that the Abbot has assigned to him,
                  but not presume to deal with what he has forbidden him.


                  Let him give the brethren their appointed allowance of food
                  without any arrogance or delay,
                  that they may not be scandalized,
                  mindful of the Word of God as to what he deserves
                  "who shall scandalize one of the little ones" (Matt 18:6).


                  If the community is a large one,
                  let helpers be given him,
                  that by their assistance
                  he may fulfill with a quiet mind the office committed to him.
                  The proper times should be observed
                  in giving the things that have to be given
                  and asking for the things that have to be asked for,
                  that no one may be troubled or vexed in the house of God.

                  REFLECTION

                  Many would shrug at a chapter like this saying: "I'm not cellarer.
                  What has that to do with me?" Everything, everything. This chapter,
                  like those on the Abbot, is a masterful view of Benedictine authority
                  and stewardship in any capacity. We should never presume to usurp
                  roles that are not our own, but in covering those roles, the Holy
                  Rule again and again gives models to ALL.

                  I am not cellarer, but this chapter reminds me that no
                  job is an empire, a turf, a personal fiefdom that one administers
                  temperamentally and without love. Jobs, for Benedictines in world or
                  monastery, are stewardships, not power trips. (At least that OUGHT to
                  be true. God save us, it is sometimes otherwise...) If people have to
                  become so careful of a given official, wearing kid gloves at every
                  possible turn, something is very, very wrong. Now the community is
                  reduced to serving the official, when it is supposed to be the other
                  way around!

                  Of course, the needs of those who come to us at work or at home can
                  be overwhelming, even oppressive at times, but we are told not to
                  react to those buttons pushed, but to react with love and humility.
                  Whatever your job is, the reality is that if there were none with
                  needs, you would likely be unemployed. Always remember that. We
                  serve, we do not rule. Our call is to forget ourselves in service,
                  not to present our intransigent selves to be served.

                  Our motto is Peace, because St. Benedict knew how completely
                  essential to a fruitful monastic life inner peace was and is. That's
                  why he gives this really rather astounding principle: "...that no one may
                  be troubled or vexed in the house of God." It's God's house, not
                  ours. Wake up, folks, if the maid is giving orders tyrannically,
                  something's wrong at the manor! It's not her house. It's His.


                  Love and prayers,
                  Jerome, OSB
                  http://www.stmarysmonastery.org

                  Petersham, MA

                   


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