Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Holy Rule for Feb. 27

Expand Messages
  • russophile2002
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Bill, serious undiagnosed problem, first thought wrongly to be a burst aneurysm, for someone having a spinal fusion, for someone
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 27, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Bill, serious undiagnosed problem, first thought
      wrongly to be a burst aneurysm, for someone having a spinal fusion,
      for someone having brain surgery for a tumor, for a 50 yr. old man
      having aortic aneursym surgery. Prayers, too, for Dunstan, eye
      surgery on March 12. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
      Thanks so much! JL


      February 27, June 28, October 28
      Chapter 21: On the Deans of the Monastery

      If the community is a large one,
      let there be chosen out of it
      brethren of good repute and holy life,
      and let them be appointed deans.
      These shall take charge of their deaneries in all things,
      observing the commandments of God
      and the instructions of their Abbot.


      Let men of such character be chosen deans
      that the Abbot may with confidence
      share his burdens among them.
      Let them be chosen not by rank
      but according to their worthiness of life
      and the wisdom of their doctrine.


      If any of these deans should become inflated with pride
      and found deserving of censure,
      let him be corrected once, and again, and a third time.
      If he will not amend,
      then let him be deposed
      and another be put in his place who is worthy of it.


      And we order the same to be done in the case of the Prior.

      REFLECTION

      Did anyone read this as I did at first, many years ago, and
      wonder: "Why did St. Benedict give them an academic name
      like "deans"? Well, it was probably the other way around! Since the
      first schools were monastic ones, it is quite likely that the
      term "dean" entered academia via the Holy Rule!

      Surely the academic gown of today is a modified form of our
      Benedictine choir robe, the cowl or cuculla. In fact, Benedictines
      used to wear their cucullas with the appropriate academic hoods as
      their formal dress at graduations and the like. With all due respect
      to the johnny-come-latelies like the Dominicans, Franciscans and
      Jesuits, when they don full academic regalia, they're wearing a
      derived form of our choir habit!

      But, enough of trivia...This chapter repeats another important
      consideration in St. Benedict's plan: people are not to be
      overburdened. This theme is less noticeable than the more important
      ones of moderation and the like, but it is there. Again and again,
      the Holy Rule says that people should have help with their charges,
      certain officials should even be exempted from serving in the
      refectory.

      Two things are going on here, both very important. Surely the first
      is kindness, gentle consideration for human frailty. The second,
      however, is every bit as defining and important: we are not our work,
      we are not our jobs, our vocation and worth is only connected to such
      things tangentially at best. Our motto is Prayer AND Work. The
      message is that neither of these should make the other impossible.

      This message is equally important for both choir monastics and
      Oblates. If your work is so much that your prayer suffers, something
      is wrong. However, especially true for those of us in the secular
      world, if your prayer is so much that your job or children or
      marriage suffers, something is REALLY wrong. If your work deprives
      your family or spouse, it might be time to look at changing it, time
      to rearrange goals and priorities a bit.

      One of the occasional problems of modern life everywhere is not just
      that we are too busy, but that we FOCUS too much attachment and will
      on stuff that really doesn't matter. Change that focus. Picture your
      job today if you had died yesterday. The important stuff would still
      get done by someone else. The rest, your own agenda, would go merrily
      down the tubes.

      Well, learn from that! A LOT of our own agendas are worth little more
      than that: going down the tubes. So why waste so much time and
      spiritual and emotional energy on them? As it does so frequently, the
      Holy Rule and Benedictine life tell us: "Get real!"

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Yesterday I had the unexpected joy of meeting Susan, the young mother of four for whom we prayed after her diagnosis of melanoma spreading to her
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 27, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        +PAX

        Yesterday I had the unexpected joy of meeting Susan, the young mother of four for whom we prayed after her diagnosis of melanoma spreading to her abdominal region. As you may recall, when she was operated on, the doctors found that was not the case and she is cancer-free. BIG hugs from Susan, which I gladly took in the name of all of us. She wanted me to express her very great thanks and I am doing that, but I did assure her it was God, not us. Ironically, Susan had just closed on a new home on the day of her misdiagnosis. What a wrenching experience that was. However, she and her children have now moved into their new home, one that, please God, they will enjoy for many years. DEO GRATIAS!

        Prayers of Deo gratias and thanksgiving for Gretchen, whom we also prayed for, she has delivered a healthy baby girl. Prayers for Michael, unemployed, that he find the job God wants and gain some stability in his life. Prayers for Amy, anorexia, and for Carl, a deacon whose leg will have to be amputated soon. All attempts at vein grafting have failed. Help them, Lord, as You know and will. God's will is best. ALl is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much! JL

        February 27, June 28, October 28
        Chapter 21: On the Deans of the Monastery

        If the community is a large one,
        let there be chosen out of it
        brethren of good repute and holy life,
        and let them be appointed deans.
        These shall take charge of their deaneries in all things,
        observing the commandments of God
        and the instructions of their Abbot.


        Let men of such character be chosen deans
        that the Abbot may with confidence
        share his burdens among them.
        Let them be chosen not by rank
        but according to their worthiness of life
        and the wisdom of their doctrine.


        If any of these deans should become inflated with pride
        and found deserving of censure,
        let him be corrected once, and again, and a third time.
        If he will not amend,
        then let him be deposed
        and another be put in his place who is worthy of it.


        And we order the same to be done in the case of the Prior.

        REFLECTION

        Did anyone read this as I did at first, many years ago, and
        wonder: "Why did St. Benedict give them an academic name
        like "deans"? Well, it was probably the other way around! Since the
        first schools were monastic ones, it is quite likely that the
        term "dean" entered academia via the Holy Rule!

        Surely the academic gown of today is a modified form of our
        Benedictine choir robe, the cowl or cuculla. In fact, Benedictines
        used to wear their cucullas with the appropriate academic hoods as
        their formal dress at graduations and the like. With all due respect
        to the johnny-come-latelies like the Dominicans, Franciscans and
        Jesuits, when they don full academic regalia, they're wearing a
        derived form of our choir habit!

        But, enough of trivia...This chapter repeats another important
        consideration in St. Benedict's plan: people are not to be
        overburdened. This theme is less noticeable than the more important
        ones of moderation and the like, but it is there. Again and again,
        the Holy Rule says that people should have help with their charges,
        certain officials should even be exempted from serving in the
        refectory.

        Two things are going on here, both very important. Surely the first
        is kindness, gentle consideration for human frailty. The second,
        however, is every bit as defining and important: we are not our work,
        we are not our jobs, our vocation and worth is only connected to such
        things tangentially at best. Our motto is Prayer AND Work. The
        message is that neither of these should make the other impossible.

        This message is equally important for both choir monastics and
        Oblates. If your work is so much that your prayer suffers, something
        is wrong. However, especially true for those of us in the secular
        world, if your prayer is so much that your job or children or
        marriage suffers, something is REALLY wrong. If your work deprives
        your family or spouse, it might be time to look at changing it, time
        to rearrange goals and priorities a bit.

        One of the occasional problems of modern life everywhere is not just
        that we are too busy, but that we FOCUS too much attachment and will
        on stuff that really doesn't matter. Change that focus. Picture your
        job today if you had died yesterday. The important stuff would still
        get done by someone else. The rest, your own agenda, would go merrily
        down the tubes.

        Well, learn from that! A LOT of our own agendas are worth little more
        than that: going down the tubes. So why waste so much time and
        spiritual and emotional energy on them? As it does so frequently, the
        Holy Rule and Benedictine life tell us: "Get real!"

        Train yourself- and it is not always easy- to learn what NOT to care
        about at all, what does not, and should not matter one bit. That is the
        detachment that is truly holy. It is not all that hard to learn, either, if one
        keeps at it and asks God for His grace, without which we can do nothing good.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jerry Lee
        +PAX There are a lot today, so if I forgot anyone, please let me know. Continued prayers for Jessie, still missing in Alaskan wilderness. A white-out storm
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 27, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          +PAX

          There are a lot today, so if I forgot anyone, please let me know.

          Continued prayers for Jessie, still missing in Alaskan wilderness. A white-out storm has hampered relief efforts. She did have some winter gear, so there is still hope. Prayers for all her family, the searchers and all who are trying to help.

          Prayers for Brad, 30's, lesion on his lung could be life-threatening, also has a kidney stone. His family lost their other son some time ago, so he is now their only child. Prayers for all his family and friends and for the doctors trying to help.

          Six very courageous folks have come forward with requests for prayers for their sexual temptations or addictions. I will always preserve the complete anonymity of such persons, but God knows well for whom we are praying. Strength and grace growth for all!! I will post initials, but they will be randomly chosen, neither the first initial nor the last of the individuals. For N, A, T, O, R and S.

          Prayers for Pam and for her sister, who is depressed, doubting her own abilities and doubting God, prayers for Shirley, recurrent bladder cancer, and for Fr. Michael, trouble walking and waiting for a knee replacement. Prayers for Pam's Dad, being received into the Church at Easter. Prayers, too, for Kevin, that a potential crisis in his marriage may be avoided and all worked through.

          Deo gratias and thanksgiving prayers for Jim and his Mom, Elaine. After 2 weeks of severe illness, she is doing much better. Thanks to all! prayers of thanks, too, for Ann and her youngest son: he is now music director in a Parish and working on a master's degree in choral conducting. lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          February 27, June 28, October 28
          Chapter 21: On the Deans of the Monastery

          If the community is a large one,
          let there be chosen out of it
          brethren of good repute and holy life,
          and let them be appointed deans.
          These shall take charge of their deaneries in all things,
          observing the commandments of God
          and the instructions of their Abbot.


          Let men of such character be chosen deans
          that the Abbot may with confidence
          share his burdens among them.
          Let them be chosen not by rank
          but according to their worthiness of life
          and the wisdom of their doctrine.


          If any of these deans should become inflated with pride
          and found deserving of censure,
          let him be corrected once, and again, and a third time.
          If he will not amend,
          then let him be deposed
          and another be put in his place who is worthy of it.


          And we order the same to be done in the case of the Prior.

          REFLECTION

          Did anyone read this as I did at first, many years ago, and
          wonder: "Why did St. Benedict give them an academic name
          like "deans"? Well, it was probably the other way around! Since the
          first schools were monastic ones, it is quite likely that the
          term "dean" entered academia via the Holy Rule!

          Surely the academic gown of today is a modified form of our
          Benedictine choir robe, the cowl or cuculla. In fact, Benedictines
          used to wear their cucullas with the appropriate academic hoods as
          their formal dress at graduations and the like. With all due respect
          to the johnny-come-latelies like the Dominicans, Franciscans and
          Jesuits, when they don full academic regalia, they're wearing a
          derived form of our choir habit!

          But, enough of trivia...This chapter repeats another important
          consideration in St. Benedict's plan: people are not to be
          overburdened. This theme is less noticeable than the more important
          ones of moderation and the like, but it is there. Again and again,
          the Holy Rule says that people should have help with their charges,
          certain officials should even be exempted from serving in the
          refectory.

          Two things are going on here, both very important. Surely the first
          is kindness, gentle consideration for human frailty. The second,
          however, is every bit as defining and important: we are not our work,
          we are not our jobs, our vocation and worth is only connected to such
          things tangentially at best. Our motto is Prayer AND Work. The
          message is that neither of these should make the other impossible.

          This message is equally important for both choir monastics and
          Oblates. If your work is so much that your prayer suffers, something
          is wrong. However, especially true for those of us in the secular
          world, if your prayer is so much that your job or children or
          marriage suffers, something is REALLY wrong. If your work deprives
          your family or spouse, it might be time to look at changing it, time
          to rearrange goals and priorities a bit.

          One of the occasional problems of modern life everywhere is not just
          that we are too busy, but that we FOCUS too much attachment and will
          on stuff that really doesn't matter. Change that focus. Picture your
          job today if you had died yesterday. The important stuff would still
          get done by someone else. The rest, your own agenda, would go merrily
          down the tubes.

          Well, learn from that! A LOT of our own agendas are worth little more
          than that: going down the tubes. So why waste so much time and
          spiritual and emotional energy on them? As it does so frequently, the
          Holy Rule and Benedictine life tell us: "Get real!"

          Train yourself- and it is not always easy- to learn what NOT to care
          about at all, what does not, and should not matter one bit. That is the
          detachment that is truly holy. It is not all that hard to learn, either, if one
          keeps at it and asks God for His grace, without which we can do nothing good.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
          +PAX Prayers, please, for Bob, having a growth removed from his skull, it looks like a basal cell carcinoma, but prayers it isn t another type. The prayers are
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 26, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for Bob, having a growth removed from his skull, it looks
            like a basal cell carcinoma, but prayers it isn't another type. The prayers
            are helping Bob in healing of acceptance of his vision impairment but it is
            still difficult for him at times. Prayers, too, for Nate, mentally ill, and for
            all his family.
            Prayers, please, for Claudia's sister and her family. Her youngest son is in
            surgery in Florida, due
            to a motorcycle accident, where he broke his foot, extent unknown at this
            time. And her husband, Bob, is experiencing "issues" with his new liver, both
            she and Bob are in Hawaii, so far from their son in FL. Prayers for them all.
            Prayers for J., exploring his identity, and for his worried parents and
            grandparents.

            Prayers for James, pneumonia, comatose in ICU for 9 days. He started running
            a fever (103) and now has a tracheotomy. A procedure to keep clots away from
            his heart is being delayed by the fever. Prayers for him and all his family,
            and for the folks who treat and care for him and all our prayer intentions,
            medically or spiritually. Prayers for Launetta, 95, and hospitalized with
            several worrying symptoms. She lost her husband last March and her son, Fr.
            Paul, is very worried about her, prayers for them both! Lord, help us all as You
            know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never
            absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            February 27, June 28, October 28
            Chapter 21: On the Deans of the Monastery

            If the community is a large one,
            let there be chosen out of it
            brethren of good repute and holy life,
            and let them be appointed deans.
            These shall take charge of their deaneries in all things,
            observing the commandments of God
            and the instructions of their Abbot.


            Let men of such character be chosen deans
            that the Abbot may with confidence
            share his burdens among them.
            Let them be chosen not by rank
            but according to their worthiness of life
            and the wisdom of their doctrine.


            If any of these deans should become inflated with pride
            and found deserving of censure,
            let him be corrected once, and again, and a third time.
            If he will not amend,
            then let him be deposed
            and another be put in his place who is worthy of it.


            And we order the same to be done in the case of the Prior.

            REFLECTION

            Did anyone read this as I did at first, many years ago, and
            wonder: "Why did St. Benedict give them an academic name
            like "deans"? Well, it was probably the other way around! Since the
            first schools were monastic ones, it is quite likely that the
            term "dean" entered academia via the Holy Rule!

            Surely the academic gown of today is a modified form of our
            Benedictine choir robe, the cowl or cuculla. In fact, Benedictines
            used to wear their cucullas with the appropriate academic hoods as
            their formal dress at graduations and the like. With all due respect
            to the johnny-come-latelies like the Dominicans, Franciscans and
            Jesuits, when they don full academic regalia, they're wearing a
            derived form of our choir habit!

            But, enough of trivia...This chapter repeats another important
            consideration in St. Benedict's plan: people are not to be
            overburdened. This theme is less noticeable than the more important
            ones of moderation and the like, but it is there. Again and again,
            the Holy Rule says that people should have help with their charges,
            certain officials should even be exempted from serving in the
            refectory.

            Two things are going on here, both very important. Surely the first
            is kindness, gentle consideration for human frailty. The second,
            however, is every bit as defining and important: we are not our work,
            we are not our jobs, our vocation and worth is only connected to such
            things tangentially at best. Our motto is Prayer AND Work. The
            message is that neither of these should make the other impossible.

            This message is equally important for both choir monastics and
            Oblates. If your work is so much that your prayer suffers, something
            is wrong. However, especially true for those of us in the secular
            world, if your prayer is so much that your job or children or
            marriage suffers, something is REALLY wrong. If your work deprives
            your family or spouse, it might be time to look at changing it, time
            to rearrange goals and priorities a bit.

            One of the occasional problems of modern life everywhere is not just
            that we are too busy, but that we FOCUS too much attachment and will
            on stuff that really doesn't matter. Change that focus. Picture your
            job today if you had died yesterday. The important stuff would still
            get done by someone else. The rest, your own agenda, would go merrily
            down the tubes.

            Well, learn from that! A LOT of our own agendas are worth little more
            than that: going down the tubes. So why waste so much time and
            spiritual and emotional energy on them? As it does so frequently, the
            Holy Rule and Benedictine life tell us: "Get real!"

            Train yourself- and it is not always easy- to learn what NOT to care
            about at all, what does not, and should not matter one bit. That is the
            detachment that is truly holy. It is not all that hard to learn, either, if
            one
            keeps at it and asks God for His grace, without which we can do nothing good.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
            _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
            Petersham, MA


            <BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
            email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
            http://www.aol.com.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.