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Holy Rule for June 24

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Br. John of Pluscarden on his patronal feast. Prayers for Max, who suufered a stroke. Prayers for Rosie, Alzheimer s disease, in the
    Message 1 of 104 , Jun 23, 2013
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Br. John of Pluscarden on his patronal feast.

      Prayers for Max, who suufered a stroke.

      Prayers for Rosie, Alzheimer's disease, in the hospital to get her meds adjusted for aggression and badly needing to get into a nursing home that can care for her properly, prayers, too, for her family as this is very stresssful for them.

      Prayers for Michelle, on the anniversary of her death, and for her husband and two sons and her parents, David and Sylvie.

      Prayers for special intentions for C.L.
      Prayers for Mike with throat cancer, in pretty bad shape from radiation treatment and its quite catastrophic side effects.



      Lord, help us all
      as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never
      absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      February 23, June 24, October 24
      Chapter 18: In What Order the Psalms Are to Be Said

      Vespers are to be sung with four Psalms every day.
      These shall begin with Psalm 109 and go on to Psalm 147,
      omitting those which are set apart for other Hours;
      that is to say that
      with the exception of Psalms 117 to 127 and Psalms 133 and 142,
      all the rest of these are to be said at Vespers.
      And since there are three Psalms too few,
      let the longer ones of the above number be divided,
      namely Psalms 138, 143 and 144.
      But let Psalm 116 because of its brevity be joined to Psalm 115.


      The order of the Vesper Psalms being thus settled,
      let the rest of the Hour --
      lesson, responsory, hymn, verse and canticle --
      be carried out as we prescribed above.


      At Compline the same Psalms are to be repeated every day,
      namely Psalms 4, 90 and 133.

      REFLECTION

      Maybe it's just me, but I find Vespers and Compline very different
      and refreshing. They are evening hours, not followed by work, except
      for the light clean up after supper, which is not a main meal here
      anyway. Vespers makes me think of finally getting home and shutting
      the door after a long day and a tough commute. It ends the workday,
      leaving the evening for family. Not shabby! A rite of passage from the job
      to the home hearth!

      A brief glance at the Psalms for Vespers will show that they are yet
      another example of consecutive, running psalmody. One right after
      another, except for a few which get bumped elsewhere or are
      thoughtfully divided because of their length. Apparently by numerical
      happenstance, Psalm 140 winds us in the Vespers grouping, and it is
      most appropriate: "Let my prayer ascend to You like incense and the
      lifting up of my hands like an evening sacrifice." Historically,
      Psalm 140 has appeared in the Vespers or services of light
      (Lucenaria) of many, many rites.

      For active monasteries, or for busy Oblates in the world, evening and
      early morning are often the only times we get of relative cloister
      and focus. The morning hours are largely available to anyone willing
      or able to get up while the rest of the world (including offspring!)
      sleeps, the evening hours perhaps less so. Those evenings are family
      times par excellence and our first vocations must always be respected.

      If, as a working parent or spouse, getting home means just getting
      started with dinner, don't despair! There is (or can be, if you
      provide for it,) a lot of undistracted solitude in cooking, even if
      it is rather harried cooking. The solitude of a kitchen at work feeding
      loved ones is a rich one, indeed.

      If you are into CD's, get one of somebody else singing Vespers and
      play it. Heaven knows, if you can put up with the kids' music, they
      can put up with yours for half an hour a day. Even if you do not
      listen to every word, the soothing chant will settle into your bones,
      become a backdrop of peace on which you can position the rest of your
      evening. Give it a shot for two weeks and I'll bet you find your
      evening meals and later times very different, because YOU are
      different!

      Solesmes Abbey in France has produced a CD of Sunday Vespers and Compline in
      Gregorian chant. In Latin, but lovely. We carry it in our gift shop here and you
      can order on-line.
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Prayers for the two young men with us this weekend at St. Mary s Monastery for a Monastic Experience Weekend, may God speak to their hearts and may we all
      Message 104 of 104 , Jun 2

        +PAX

         

        Prayers for the two young men with us this weekend at St. Mary’s Monastery for a Monastic Experience Weekend, may God speak to their hearts and may we all do His will.

         

        Prayers for the eternal rest of Amaro, 64, and for all his family and all who mourn him. Prayers, too, for the eternal rest of Tania, his sister, who predeceased him.

         

        Prayers for Fr. Karola Meissner,OSB, of Poland, who turned 90 last month. Graces galore and many more, ad multos annos!

         

        Prayers for Erica, having surgery, and for her family.

         

        Prayers for D., that she returns to the Sacraments.

         

        Prayers for Nathaniel and his wife and for all the children they teach in their parish’s religious education program.

         

        Prayers for me, on my birthday. Thanks in advance to all!

         

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
        mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 2, June 3, October 3
        Chapter 7: On Humility

        The fifth degree of humility
        is that he hide from his Abbot none of the evil thoughts
        that enter his heart
        or the sins committed in secret,
        but that he humbly confess them.
        The Scripture urges us to this when it says,
        "Reveal your way to the Lord and hope in Him" (Ps. 36:5)
        and again,
        "Confess to the Lord, for He is good,
        for His mercy endures forever" (Ps. 105:1).
        And the Prophet likewise says,
        "My offense I have made known to You,
        and my iniquities I have not covered up.
        I said: 'I will declare against myself my iniquities to the Lord;'
        and 'You forgave the wickedness of my heart'" (Ps. 31:5).

        REFLECTION

        A caution here: the Holy Rule uses the Septuagint version's numbering
        of the Psalms, not the Hebrew. Since most Bibles today use the latter
        system, even many Catholic editions, you might find that the Psalm
        referred to in this passage, which I strongly recommend you read
        through, is 32, not 31.

        Psalm 31 (32) is a wonderful exposition of sin and forgiveness. It
        begins by recounting the joy of one whose sin has been forgiven, then
        proceeds to unfold how concealing sin affects one and confessing sin
        heals one. In v. 3-4, immediately prior to the 5th verse which St.
        Benedict quotes, we find the following: "I kept it secret and my
        frame was wasted. I groaned all the day long for night and day Your
        hand was heavy upon me. Indeed, my strength was dried up as by the
        summer's heat."

        Guilty secrets control us, they rob us of our freedom, they destroy
        our peace. Long before one's frame is wasted (though that, too will
        eventually happen,) one's mind and spirit are trashed, laid low by
        the relentless fear of discovery. We shall have a MUCH harder time
        spiritually, if we try to keep our guilty secrets totally hidden.

        What the guilty one is fleeing is within herself, and
        travels right along with her. Ever see a news clip about a fugitive
        who successfully hid for decades and then was caught? I wonder what
        kind of life they had in the meantime, a life never free, a life that
        always had to fear. This is not what Jesus called us to.

        One may not belong to a tradition which practices sacramental
        confession, but all of us need the abscesses of our secret guilt
        lanced and drained somehow. AA, a spiritual program which can fit
        itself to any religion or no religion, insists that without confession to at
        least one other trustworthy person, our faults are likely to rule us forever.
        Don't spill your beans to just anyone, but don't hold them festering
        within, either! [A heavy PS, too: if you do belong to a Church that
        has sacramental Confession, GO!! Too many put that off at great
        risk and harm to themselves.]

        What keeps us chained to our dirty secrets is lack of faith, lack of
        trust: no one will love me if they know this, not God, not anyone.
        Well, the ending verses of Psalm 31(32) deal quite neatly with this
        falsehood:

        "Many sorrows have the wicked, but those who trust in the Lord,
        loving mercy surrounds them. Rejoice, rejoice in the Lord, exult, you
        just! O come, ring out your joy, all you upright of heart!" (Ps.
        31:10-11)

        Not only does God forgive, but the guilty one now freed is accounted
        as among the just and the upright of heart, without any further ado.
        Now THAT is Divine Mercy! No heart is more full of such infinite
        mercy than the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Trust Him!

        Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in You. Jesus, meek and
        humble of Heart, make our hearts like unto Yours.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

         

         

         

         

         

         

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