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Holy Rule for Dec. 7

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Bob B., who just had his fourth heart attack. Prayers for the eternal rest of all who died at Pearl Harbor on this date, for all
    Message 1 of 59 , Dec 6, 2012
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Bob B., who just had his fourth heart attack.

      Prayers for the eternal rest of all who died at Pearl Harbor on this date, for
      all their loved ones and all who mourn them and for all World War II veterans, living and dead.
      Prayers, too, for the many survivors and surviving families who had their lives changed forever that day.

      Lord, help us all as You now and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
      grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      April 7, August 7, December 7
      Chapter 55: On the Clothes and Shoes of the Brethren

      Let clothing be given to the brethren
      according to the nature of the place in which they dwell
      and its climate;
      for in cold regions more will be needed,
      and in warm regions less.
      This is to be taken into consideration, therefore, by the Abbot.

      We believe, however, that in ordinary places
      the following dress is sufficient for each monk:
      a tunic,
      a cowl (thick and woolly for winter, thin or worn for summer),
      a scapular for work,
      stockings and shoes to cover the feet.

      The monks should not complain
      about the color or the coarseness of any of these things,
      but be content with what can be found
      in the district where they live and
      can be purchased cheaply.

      The Abbot shall see to the size of the garments,
      that they be not too short for those who wear them,
      but of the proper fit.

      Let those who receive new clothes
      always give back the old ones at once,
      to be put away in the wardrobe for the poor.
      For it is sufficient if a monk has two tunics and two cowls,
      to allow for night wear and for the washing of these garments;
      more than that is superfluity and should be taken away.
      Let them return their stockings also and anything else that is old
      when they receive new ones.

      Those who are sent on a journey
      shall receive drawers from the wardrobe,
      which they shall wash and restore on their return.
      And let their cowls and tunics be somewhat better
      than what they usually wear.
      These they shall receive from the wardrobe
      when they set out on a journey,
      and restore when they return.

      REFLECTION

      Well, I could write another love song to the habit, and I surely do
      love it, but there is an issue here for all who are outside the
      cloister, yet still with the monastic struggle. Clothes do not make
      the monastic, but they do set up some very potent markers, for good
      or ill. The Benedictine job is to find the golden mean, avoiding
      extremes.

      One's clothing sends a message, fair or not. The message it sends may
      very well advance or inhibit any subsequent messages one may try to
      send. Sometimes lay people who are intensely religious will go
      overboard in what can only be called eccentricity in dress. Bad move!
      Right or wrong, our society writes them off at first glance. The odds
      of being a witness who is heard are diminished. We should want our
      appearance to suggest that Jesus Christ is WORTH turning to, not that
      we are simply eccentrics with no fashion sense.

      Simple, decent, clean, middle-of-the-road clothing is a goal
      virtually any Oblate can attain. Not too flashy and costly, but
      neither so tacky or beyond the fringe that it invokes scorn. The
      cheaper the better, but not just for stinge!

      The clothing industry in the West rides roughshod on the backs of a
      LOT of oppressed people in the less developed countries. Buying your
      good clothes used may not stop those awful practices, but it will at
      least stop your direct complicity in them. Buy a used $45 shirt at a
      Salvation Army Thrift Store and your $5 or so will actually go
      towards helping someone in need, not just perpetuating that need.
      Think how you look, but think very carefully of where your money
      goes.

      A further little fussy word here. Think twice about wearing labels
      that show OUTSIDE. I speak as one who once loved buying used shirts
      with some pricey brand's logo emblazoned on the breast. Sigh...
      Conspicuous consumption depends on visible labels like that, and you
      could be adding to a fire you'd rather extinguish. As a monk, I
      became embarrassed to wear such things. It sent the wrong message
      entirely.

      Lastly, almost everyone I know could make do with less clothes. We
      pack a lot of consumerist variety into those closets of ours and that
      sends a message, too. Always remember that the extra coat in our
      chest "belongs to the poor," as St. Basil said.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Happy and blessed Thanksgiving Day to all in the US who are celebrating today. God be thanked for His many blessings to us all. Prayers for all and
      Message 59 of 59 , Nov 23, 2016

        +PAX

         

        Happy and blessed Thanksgiving Day to all in the US who are celebrating today. God be thanked for His many blessings to us all. Prayers for all and especially for the safety of those travelling.

         

        Prayers for Cas, who has gastrointestinal cancer. Prayers, too, for Bev, his wife, and Gabrielle, their daughter. Bev is a classmate of mine from Tampa Catholic High.

         

        Prayers for Fr. Benedict Nivakoff, OSB, newly appointed Prior of the Benedictine community at Norcia, Italy, and continued prayers for them as they recover from the catastrophic damage the earthquake did to their monastery and basilica.

         

        Prayers for Christopher, 13, in hospice care at home with brain cancer and thought to be very close to death. Prayers for his family, too, and for all who will mourn him.

         

        Prayers for Daniel, had an injection for knee pain, knee reduced to bone on bone and will eventually need a replacement.

         

        Prayers for the eternal rest of Greg, and for all his family and all who mourn him.


        Prayers for the eternal rest of Stella, 92, a Benedictine Oblate, and prayers for her family and all who mourn her.

         

        Prayers for B., for her return to the Faith.

         

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 25, July 25, November 24
        Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

        When anyone has made a mistake
        while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
        an antiphon or a lesson,
        if he does not humble himself there before all
        by making a satisfaction,
        let him undergo a greater punishment
        because he would not correct by humility
        what he did wrong through carelessness.

        But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

        REFLECTION

        Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
        experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
        days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
        whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not
        get so mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how
        terribly recent some of them are.

        As I have mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center
        when late for choir, then bow to the superior and go to our
        place. We also kneel when we make audible mistakes in Church. And
        yes, those things, as I pointed out, can be very useful.

        But most Oblates do not have a choir to kneel in, so
        what's here for the majority of us? There is the grace of humility,
        without which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
        home would be unlivable.


        Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
        share of kinks, strays and crosses. Every one without fail
        will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. The
        gamut of human flaws exists in microcosm, in at least some mitigated form,
        in every human group.

        Even more annoyingly, most, if not all, pieces of our OWN broken
        humanity will be modeled, much to our distaste, by others around us. It is,
        alas, our own sins and faults in others that tend to annoy us most. Never
        forget to check for that. He or she may REALLY tick you off because
        of the great similarities between you!

        Our job is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part
        of the problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
        we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
        quickly as we can.

        If you can't say "I'm sorry," for heaven's sake- quite literally- start
        practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
        tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
        perfect,) substitutes, like "Excuse me," or "It was my fault." Work
        on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
        that's OK,".

        Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
        shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
        of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
        minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
        produce them.

        Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
        from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
        that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
        apology, why not try a bit of self-interview?

        WHY do these things or persons upset you so? What do you have in
        common with those who annoy you most? Most important, just who the
        heck ARE you that your perceived slights are such a big deal? Try
        reminding yourself that He is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these
        points may be a big and promising start.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

         

         

         

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