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Holy Rule for Dec. 5

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual and temporal welfare of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Lila, problems with her
    Message 1 of 58 , Dec 4 2:22 PM
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      Prayers, please, for the spiritual and temporal welfare of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Lila, problems with her vision and other health issues, too.

      Avery, 4, for whom we prayed, is in ICU with brain swelling, they are trying to keep the swelling down and keep him sedated, but the next 36-72 hours are critical.

      Milton, throat operations and for his full recovery.

      Deo gratias, Anne has been discharged and there is no sign of Crohn's disease in the bowel section removed. Continued prayers for her recovery.

      Sharon, surgery to repair a tear in her esophagus.

      help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace.
      God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      April 5, August 5, December 5
      Chapter 53: On the Reception of Guests

      Let there be a separate kitchen for the Abbot and guests,
      that the brethren may not be disturbed when guests,
      who are never lacking in a monastery,
      arrive at irregular hours.
      Let two brethren capable of filling the office well
      be appointed for a year to have charge of this kitchen.
      Let them be given such help as they need,
      that they may serve without murmuring.
      And on the other hand,
      when they have less to occupy them,
      let them go out to whatever work is assigned them.

      And not only in their case
      but in all the offices of the monastery
      let this arrangement be observed,
      that when help is needed it be supplied,
      and again when the workers are unoccupied
      they do whatever they are bidden.

      The guest house also shall be assigned to a brother
      whose soul is possessed by the fear of God.
      Let there be a sufficient number of beds made up in it;
      and let the house of God be managed by prudent men
      and in a prudent manner.

      On no account shall anyone who is not so ordered
      associate or converse with guests.
      But if he should meet them or see them,
      let him greet them humbly, as we have said,
      ask their blessing and pass on,
      saying that he is not allowed to converse with a guest.


      Asking that the house of God be prudently governed by the prudent
      surely applies to more than the guest house. That principle goes for
      the whole monastery, as well as for the families and homes of those
      monastics in the world outside the cloister. This is not just another
      call to frugality or economy or order for their own sakes. We are
      Benedictines, we don't do ANYTHING for its own sake, except God!

      The important reason behind this prudence and care is that we ARE
      managing the House of God. All our Benedictine homes, our monasteries
      and our guesthouses are the Houses of God. The humblest one-room
      studio apartment of an Oblate is the House of God. How easily we
      forget that, how commonly we think of those places as solely our own!

      The whole idea of balance and peace and moderation and serenity is
      nothing more or less than a singular setting for a pearl of very
      great price. We need those things for our monastic struggle to be
      most effective. Sometimes a surgeon might have to operate on a bloody
      battlefield, but don't be surprised if infection follows. It's the
      same with us and dysfunctional, imprudent messes.

      We CAN operate there if we have to, but infections are likely. We
      need a certain amount of reduction of inconsequential hassles to
      focus on the one thing necessary. St. Benedict strives to provide us
      with that. No, the monastery is not a sterile surgical suite (and I
      always worry when one looks that way!) but neither is it an ill-
      housed flock of free range chickens. Show me a monastery or home that
      has become a chaotic mess and I can guarantee you there will be a
      LOT of spiritual ramifications, as well.

      Drawing on the wisdom of St. Thomas Aquinas, (our Order conducted
      some of his early schooling at Monte Cassino,) we can surely
      affirm that "peace is the tranquility of order." St. Thomas' view of
      the virtues is important to us, too, imbued with the
      principles of Aristotle: "Virtus in media stat." Virtue stands in the
      middle way. What could be more Benedictinely moderate and balanced?

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Kathleen, 92, having esophageal surgery, many problems, badly needs prayers. Prayers, please, for Adolfo and his wife, Mary Carmen.
      Message 58 of 58 , Jan 16, 2013
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        Prayers, please, for Kathleen, 92, having esophageal surgery, many problems, badly needs prayers.

        Prayers, please, for Adolfo and his wife, Mary Carmen.

        Prayers for Chris, on his 42nd birthday, graces galore and many more!

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL.

        January 17, May 18, September 17
        Chapter 3: On Calling the Brethren for Counsel

        In all things, therefore, let all follow the Rule as guide,
        and let no one be so rash as to deviate from it.
        Let no one in the monastery follow his own heart's fancy;
        and let no one presume to contend with his Abbot
        in an insolent way or even outside of the monastery.
        But if anyone should presume to do so,
        let him undergo the discipline of the Rule.
        At the same time,
        the Abbot himself should do all things in the fear of God
        and in observance of the Rule,
        knowing that beyond a doubt
        he will have to render an account of all his decisions
        to God, the most just Judge.

        But if the business to be done in the interests of the monastery
        be of lesser importance,
        let him take counsel with the seniors only.
        It is written,
        "Do everything with counsel,
        and you will not repent when you have done it" (Eccles. 32:24).


        The key here is not to contend insolently; there is no proscription
        against telling the Abbot one feels something is amiss, so long as it
        is done respectfully and humbly. We are Benedictines, not fascists;
        we have a Father, not a Fuhrer.

        Human nature being what it is, people are usually more prone to cite
        the Abbot's responsibility to seek counsel than they are to cite the
        equally important proscription against contending with one's Abbot!
        There's a cure for that and many other ills buried within this
        chapter, a telling phrase whose observance promises peace. That
        little gem urges the monastics not to follow their "own heart's

        Follow that gem and peace abounds! For one thing, whether abbot or
        monastic, parent or child, boss or employee, the focus of the
        relationship ceases to become self. None of us are anywheres near the
        big deal we'd either like to be or think ourselves to be! Much of
        what seems earth-shattering to us is really small stuff, indeed.

        This is so important to monastic struggle because it is so intricately
        interwoven with detachment and holy indifference. We must learn how
        to hold onto our inner peace, how to safeguard it from damage at the
        hands of trivia. An abject TERRIBLE day for us, one when we are so
        hurt or angry that the world seems to have stopped, is just another average
        day for the rest of the community. Until, of course we decide we ARE
        the center of the universe and ruin it for them... Cling to that
        knowledge of trivia and less will suffer!

        At that point of recognizing trivia, truth and therefore, humility
        enter into the equation. We need very good "trivia
        detectors" and their default setting must be aimed at ourselves,
        rarely cast elsewhere except in cases of really great need. We can
        keep those detectors more than amply busy just in our own hearts
        and wills! We need to know deception, falsity, trivia, but it is
        essential to know them first in ourselves.

        If these good tools of detection are aimed only at others, the result
        will be pride and a fall, not humility and truth. Jesus said "I am
        the Truth," and to Him we must prefer nothing. Hence, our first
        desire must always be the truth and the truth is that the earth does
        not revolve around us as an axis!

        Our age, particularly, has embraced the idea of "Follow your bliss!"
        Well, maybe...sometimes.... but maybe not, too. Our "bliss" is no
        guarantee of infallibility. Years ago, and for many years of my life,
        I thought my "bliss" would be very different from where I finally wound up.

        As a handy rule of thumb, I would say that the will of God quite
        often looks nothing like bliss at first. Hence, confusing bliss with
        the divine will can be very risky. The will of God often BECOMES
        bliss when we are in the midst of following it, or in hindsight, but we
        have to be dragged, kicking and screaming, into that compliance!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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