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Holy Rule for Dec. 4

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Janet, and for her husband, children and granddaughters and all who mourn her, esp. Marialyce, her best friend since
    Message 1 of 59 , Dec 3, 2012
      +PAX

      Prayers for the eternal rest of Janet, and for her husband, children and granddaughters and all who mourn her, esp. Marialyce, her best friend since second grade.

      Today is a special day of prayer for peace in Syria, please join all those praying at the request of the Cathoic Bishops of England and Wales.

      Prayers for the spiritual and temporal welfare of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Linda's Mom, she had breast cancer 15 years ago, but surgery and radiation got rid of it. Now, she has a lump in her breast and is going in for a biopsy this week. Please pray that it isn't a recurrence of the cancer.

      Avery, 4, hit his head and had a seizure, then surgery on his head, presumably to relieve prerssure on his brain and now in a coma, and for all his family.

      Rose begins treatment for her liver tomorrow, she had Hepatitis C many years ago, and it caused great damage. She is very hopeful that this treatment will help.

      Sadie, 7, has serious heart disease and anaemia, and ended up needing a blood transfusion. The next night she took some kind of turn, so they flew her down to a specialist children's hospital. Andrew, Sadie's father, also has heart trouble. Please pray for Sadie's healing (and Andrew's), and also for comfort and strength for the family.

      Lord, help them as You know and will. God's
      will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise
      Him! Thanks so much. JL

      April 4, August 4, December 4

      Chapter 53: On the Reception of Guests

      Let all guests who arrive be received like Christ,
      for He is going to say,
      "I came as a guest, and you received Me" (Matt. 25:35).
      And to all let due honor be shown,
      especially to the domestics of the faith and to pilgrims.

      As soon as a guest is announced, therefore,
      let the Superior or the brethren meet him
      with all charitable service.
      And first of all let them pray together,
      and then exchange the kiss of peace.
      For the kiss of peace should not be offered
      until after the prayers have been said,
      on account of the devil's deceptions.

      In the salutation of all guests, whether arriving or departing,
      let all humility be shown.
      Let the head be bowed
      or the whole body prostrated on the ground
      in adoration of Christ, who indeed is received in their persons.

      After the guests have been received and taken to prayer,
      let the Superior or someone appointed by him sit with them.
      Let the divine law be read before the guest for his edification,
      and then let all kindness be shown him.
      The Superior shall break his fast for the sake of a guest,
      unless it happens to be a principal fast day
      which may not be violated.
      The brethren, however, shall observe the customary fasts.
      Let the Abbot give the guests water for their hands;
      and let both Abbot and community wash the feet of all guests.
      After the washing of the feet let them say this verse:
      "We have received Your mercy, O God,
      in the midst of Your temple" (Ps.47:10).

      In the reception of the poor and of pilgrims
      the greatest care and solicitude should be shown,
      because it is especially in them that Christ is received;
      for as far as the rich are concerned,
      the very fear which they inspire
      wins respect for them.

      REFLECTION

      So much is written about Benedictine hospitality that I thought,
      after nearly 12 years of caring for the guesthouse, I'd write about
      some of the
      things it is NOT, since people sometimes seem confused by this. Yes,
      we are told to receive all as Christ, but at the onset a salient
      difference or two between Christ Himself and the guests becomes
      evident. Christ was sinless, Christ was not a threat to others,
      Christ was perfect in mind and body and soul.

      When I was guestmaster, I was told of a few people who in no way
      were ever to be accepted again. For one reason or another, the
      community absolutely did not want them here again. A few- very few-
      added themselves to that list in my time. It is useful to
      note that often these people put either themselves or others
      or both at risk for one reason or another. There were some the
      monastics were downright afraid of, others whom other guests would
      have feared had they only known.

      One absolutely stunned into silence an entire group of retreatants of
      which she was not a member by an outburst of verbally violent abuse
      and belligerence that none had seen coming at all. She really ruined
      the retreat for them, destroyed everyone's peace and the peace of the
      house. Everyone walked on eggs for the rest of the weekend. Sorry,
      doesn't happen here twice.

      One can demonstrate this principle clearly by going even a notch
      above the guesthouse: come to join the monastery addicted to
      disrupting the peace and you will be escorted out, probably well
      before vows.

      People do not enjoy Benedictine hospitality as an always
      and everywhere right. As in any human area, the rights of others must
      be considered and sometimes decisively so. A monastery is a haven of
      peace, but it has to take steps to ensure that it remains that for as
      many as possible.

      Love and prayers,

      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Happy and blessed Thanksgiving Day to all in the US who are celebrating today. God be thanked for His many blessings to us all. Prayers for all and
      Message 59 of 59 , Nov 23, 2016

        +PAX

         

        Happy and blessed Thanksgiving Day to all in the US who are celebrating today. God be thanked for His many blessings to us all. Prayers for all and especially for the safety of those travelling.

         

        Prayers for Cas, who has gastrointestinal cancer. Prayers, too, for Bev, his wife, and Gabrielle, their daughter. Bev is a classmate of mine from Tampa Catholic High.

         

        Prayers for Fr. Benedict Nivakoff, OSB, newly appointed Prior of the Benedictine community at Norcia, Italy, and continued prayers for them as they recover from the catastrophic damage the earthquake did to their monastery and basilica.

         

        Prayers for Christopher, 13, in hospice care at home with brain cancer and thought to be very close to death. Prayers for his family, too, and for all who will mourn him.

         

        Prayers for Daniel, had an injection for knee pain, knee reduced to bone on bone and will eventually need a replacement.

         

        Prayers for the eternal rest of Greg, and for all his family and all who mourn him.


        Prayers for the eternal rest of Stella, 92, a Benedictine Oblate, and prayers for her family and all who mourn her.

         

        Prayers for B., for her return to the Faith.

         

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 25, July 25, November 24
        Chapter 45: On Those Who Make Mistakes in the Oratory

        When anyone has made a mistake
        while reciting a Psalm, a responsory,
        an antiphon or a lesson,
        if he does not humble himself there before all
        by making a satisfaction,
        let him undergo a greater punishment
        because he would not correct by humility
        what he did wrong through carelessness.

        But boys for such faults shall be whipped.

        REFLECTION

        Calm down, we don't whip anybody anymore. It has too often been my
        experience that such lines push all the buttons of some readers these
        days and blind them to the rest of the good stuff there. We don't
        whip now, they did 1,500 years ago, everyone else did, too. Let's not
        get so mired in the sensitivities of our own time that we forget how
        terribly recent some of them are.

        As I have mentioned before, in our house we do kneel in the center
        when late for choir, then bow to the superior and go to our
        place. We also kneel when we make audible mistakes in Church. And
        yes, those things, as I pointed out, can be very useful.

        But most Oblates do not have a choir to kneel in, so
        what's here for the majority of us? There is the grace of humility,
        without which communal life on any level, in monastery, workplace, market or
        home would be unlivable.


        Every single human community or whatever sort is going to have its
        share of kinks, strays and crosses. Every one without fail
        will mirror in some sense the fallen brokenness of humanity. The
        gamut of human flaws exists in microcosm, in at least some mitigated form,
        in every human group.

        Even more annoyingly, most, if not all, pieces of our OWN broken
        humanity will be modeled, much to our distaste, by others around us. It is,
        alas, our own sins and faults in others that tend to annoy us most. Never
        forget to check for that. He or she may REALLY tick you off because
        of the great similarities between you!

        Our job is to see to it that we are part of the solution, not part
        of the problem. When, through whatever means, we become part of the problem,
        we must own up to it at once and smooth it over as best and as
        quickly as we can.

        If you can't say "I'm sorry," for heaven's sake- quite literally- start
        practicing alone in front of a mirror until the words can somehow
        tumble out in public. Until they can, try some useful (though not
        perfect,) substitutes, like "Excuse me," or "It was my fault." Work
        on words of forgiveness, too, like: "It doesn't matter," or "Oh,
        that's OK,".

        Strive to make light of things. There will never be any
        shortage whatever of people who will explode and magnify things out
        of all rational proportion, so don't duplicate services! Join the
        minority and try to prevent hurricanes in teacups, rather than
        produce them.

        Most outrage, most lack of apology, most tempests in teacups stem
        from a distorted an unhealthy view of the self. Humility corrects
        that imbalance. While you're in front of the mirror practicing
        apology, why not try a bit of self-interview?

        WHY do these things or persons upset you so? What do you have in
        common with those who annoy you most? Most important, just who the
        heck ARE you that your perceived slights are such a big deal? Try
        reminding yourself that He is God and you are not. Honest reflection on these
        points may be a big and promising start.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

         

         

         

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