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Holy Rule for July 15

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Rev. David, for all his family and parishoners and all who mourn him. Prayers for the spiritual and temporal welfare of
    Message 1 of 236 , Jul 14, 2012
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      Prayers for the eternal rest of Rev. David, for all his family and parishoners and all who mourn him.

      Prayers for the spiritual and temporal welfare of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Deo Gratias! Tanner for whom we have prayed, was scheduled to be Baptized at 2pm yesterday. Continued prayers for his recovery.

      Craig and his wife traveling to Saskatoon on Monday where he is being tested for a genetic condition called haemochromatosis, an inherited blood disorder that causes the body to retain excessive amounts of iron, which can lead to serious health consequences, most notably cirrhosis of the liver. Prayers also for their daughter that she will not be genetically disposed to the illness.

      From Lorene: Deo gratias. I wanted to thank everyone who prayed for my husband Mario. I had asked for prayers for him to receive a new position in his current company - ability to receive his bonus and not to be laid off. All of it came true! It is a miracle that I will never forget. The power of prayer is more powerful than anxiety, worry or fear. I will turn to prayer always - especially for thanking the good Lord for his blessings. Wanted to share this so that everyone knows that God IS listening and He IS there for you.

      Deo gratias, John, for whom we prayed, came through his cardiac valve surgery fine, continued prayers for his recovery..

      Emilia, for a safe and holy trip to Ireland.

      Lucille, having a CT scan Monday to determine cause of a blockage in her liver. Has a history of malignant melanoma, and she is very nervous about it.

      Elaine, undergoing chemotherapy for bladder cancer. She has lost a great amount of weight, and is having trouble gaining any of it back. She has many other health problems, as well as serious health problems in her son.

      Jay, hospitalized with a leg infection, following sun poisoning, and due to fly to the UK for his mother-in-law's memorial service this coming week. Healing and if possible safe travel.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All
      is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      March 15, July 15, November 14
      Chapter 36: On the Sick

      Before all things and above all things,
      care must be taken of the sick,
      so that they will be served as if they were Christ in person;
      for He Himself said, "I was sick, and you visited Me" (Matt 25:36),
      and, "What you did for one of these least ones, you did for Me"
      (Matt.25:40).
      But let the sick on their part consider
      that they are being served for the honor of God,
      and let them not annoy their sisters who are serving them
      by their unnecessary demands.
      Yet they should be patiently borne with,
      because from such as these is gained a more abundant reward.
      Therefore the Abbess shall take the greatest care
      that they suffer no neglect.


      For these sick let there be assigned a special room
      and an attendant who is God-fearing, diligent and solicitous.
      Let the use of baths be afforded the sick
      as often as may be expedient;
      but to the healthy, and especially to the young,
      let them be granted more rarely.
      Moreover,
      let the use of meat be granted to the sick who are very weak,
      for the restoration of their strength;
      but when they are convalescent,
      let all abstain from meat as usual.


      The Abbess shall take the greatest care
      that the sick be not neglected by the cellarers or the attendants;
      for she also is responsible for what is done wrongly by her disciples.

      REFLECTION

      "Before all things and above all things..." is a very strong
      statement. If St. Benedict meant that, and we must assume he did,
      monasteries and families should not only make sure that the sick are
      full and equal members, but even that they have priority. The sick
      bear a responsibility in this: they are not to "vex" those caring for
      them, but even if they fail in that, they must be borne with
      patiently.

      Let's face it, at a certain point, the sick are definitely "out of
      the loop" in human society. This is even more true of the long-term,
      chronically ill. This is, of course, very typical primate behavior-
      for a nomadic troop of baboons, it would be fine. Christianity and
      Benedictinism, however call us to rise far above such limitations of
      natural response. We are called to be more than natural. We are bound
      to strive for the SUPERnatural.

      Even in monasteries, especially large ones, the sick can be shelved
      and forgotten by some members. Rest assured that, unless wheeled to
      church or refectory, the sick are quite likely to never lay eyes on
      certain members. In this aspect, the monastics mirror a similar flaw
      in the secular world and in many families: out of sight, out of mind.
      The concerns of one's active daily life can lead to a certain
      selfishness, and the Holy Rule is trying to prevent this. We must be
      different from the world, different from that nomadic troop of
      primates. We must be more. Both Gospel and Rule, baptism and monastic
      commitment demand that.

      Oblates in the world, there is a rich field of endeavor here and you
      will hardly have to get in line to enter it. Nursing homes freak you
      out? There are adult day care programs that might be easier for you.
      I used to do four Communion services a week in such places when I was
      in Boston, and, had I been able, they would have gladly let me do
      more. When I left to come here, every single one of
      those services dropped to once a month or less. There is work for you
      to do if you want to get yourself commissioned as a Eucharistic
      minister and go for it. These were people that not only the world,
      but even the Church had largely forgotten. The chance to do anything
      for them enriched my life immeasurably.

      Does even day care get to you? Then turn to the families of the
      chronically ill. To a large extent, they often share the isolation of
      the patient in a very real and very unfair way. Find some ways to not
      forget them, to give them a breath of normalcy and relief and you
      will find their lives, the patient's life and your own changing for
      the better. Everyone can do something, and there is plenty to do!

      Ask most people what the hallmark of the Benedictine Order is and
      they will likely respond with either liturgy or hospitality. Our Holy
      Rule's prescription that all guests be received as Christ is
      justifiably famous, as is our concern for the liturgy. However,
      another hallmark less attended to is this chapter's insistence that
      we receive and serve Christ in the sick, too. Would that we deserved
      to have people choosing between THREE hallmarks for their answer-
      care of the sick, liturgy and hospitality!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA

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    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual and temporal welfare of the following, for al their loved ones and all who take care of them: Pat, terminal brain
      Message 236 of 236 , Nov 21, 2012
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        Prayers, please, for the spiritual and temporal welfare of the following, for al their loved ones and all who take care of them:

        Pat, terminal brain cancer, for her happy death.

        Deo gratias, David got his contract, prayers for him in his new job.

        Debbie , a mother of two young children, just diagnosed with lymphoma leukemia;
        Shannon, that she know God's great love for her and be open to his guidance and will;

        for financial stability for two persons who are in debt

        Andrew, brain cancer, on his 31st birthday.

        Lorene, experiencing pains and illness symptoms and worried about results of what this could be. Please pray that she is fine and no disease/illness. Very frightened.

        for those still suffering from Hurricane Sandy. May they come out of this tragedy with optimism and find love, peace, health and happiness again.

        Paul C. and his family, for God's will to be done.

        Prayers for the eternal rest of John F. Kennedy, on the anniversary of his
        assassination.

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy
        and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL


        March 23, July 23, November 22
        Chapter 43: On Those Who Come Late to the Work of God or to Table

        Anyone who does not come to table before the verse,
        so that all together may say the verse and the oration
        and all sit down to table at the same time --
        anyone who
        through his own carelessness or bad habit
        does not come on time
        shall be corrected for this up to the second time.
        If then he does not amend,
        he shall not be allowed to share in the common table,
        but shall be separated from the company of all
        and made to eat alone,
        and his portion of wine shall be taken away from him,
        until he has made satisfaction and has amended.
        And let him suffer a like penalty who is not present
        at the verse said after the meal.

        REFLECTION

        OK, before we all get hopelessly mired in the belief that St.
        Benedict is REALLY mired in punctuality issues, let's try a parable
        reality check. What if every bus (or train or plane or subway,)
        waited for the latecomer to arrive? For starters, the schedule of
        everyone sitting helpless on that mode of transportation would be
        disrupted. Everyone would be late, every single one. Some would miss
        work, others a wedding, others still a connection with friends to
        leave on vacation. If all public transport followed such a program,
        our whole world would be a chaotic mess of very unhappy campers in
        nothing flat.

        Benedictine communities do things together. Usually, that means that
        a late arrival at a meal keeps everyone sitting there when already
        finished, waiting for the tardy one to eat. (Occasionally a superior
        will intervene and end the meal more or less on time, but often that
        is not the case. Everybody waits.) This lengthening of the meal then
        throws the whole schedule off. The Office cannot suffer, it's times
        are inexorable, so what usually gets clipped is free time, recreation
        or work. Rob people of these on a regular basis and they can get very
        annoyed!

        Lateness which is unavoidable is just that, unavoidable. That's a
        time when the meal ought to be prolonged, when the others ought to
        witness that we "bear one another's burdens" and so fulfill the law
        of Christ. Brother X is my brother. I am responsible for a large chunk
        of his communal life. If I say that doesn't matter and stroll into
        dinner whenever I feel like it, something is terribly wrong with me.
        I need to have my skewed vision and values corrected. That's what
        this is all about: loving one another rightly.

        Much of the Holy Rule which deals with communal life (and is VERY
        easy to apply to family life or workplace,) has to do with what should
        really be common courtesy and decency. Granted, sometimes those values get
        wrapped in ancient language and gesture, making it less easy to see
        how simple and modern they are, but those exhortations to polite,
        considerate, gentle living are things anyone can follow in any milieu, to great
        benefit! Many of those courtesies are threatened or altogether lacking today.
        Helping keep them alive may start a conversion in another we will never know
        until heaven.

        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA




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