Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Holy Rule for May 15

Expand Messages
  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Father Thomas Fernandes Remedios, 37. On a church outing, he saved three youth from drowning and died of a heart attack on
    Message 1 of 149 , May 14, 2010
      +PAX

      Prayers for the eternal rest of Father Thomas Fernandes Remedios, 37. On a church outing, he saved three youth from drowning and died of a heart attack on the shore. He truly gave his life for his sheep.

      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Joe, late stages of cancer, for his happy death when God calls him and for all his family and all who will mourn him.

      Fr. Bob, recovering from eye surgery, a few more weeks before he can know if it was successful.

      Prayers for Catherine, hoping to get an early retirement package at work, which would smooth over many things for her and Doug, her husband.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will.
      God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him!
      Thanks so much. JL

      January 14, May 15, September 14
      Chapter 2: What Kind of Person the Abbess Ought to Be

      The Abbess should always remember what she is
      and what she is called,
      and should know that to whom more is committed,
      from her more is required (Luke 12:48).
      Let her understand also
      what a difficult and arduous task she has undertaken:
      ruling souls and adapting herself to a variety of characters.
      One she must coax, another scold, another persuade,
      according to each one's character and understanding.
      Thus she must adjust and adapt herself to all
      in such a way that she may not only suffer no loss
      in the flock committed to her care,
      but may even rejoice in the increase of a good flock.

      REFLECTION

      We have seen a lot of things that lessen the culpability of parents,
      abbots, and those in charge. St. Benedict, however, is the relentless fan
      of balance, so here come a couple of zingers that cannot be
      overlooked. In its purest form, Christian authority is a precious
      stone, indeed, but the gold in which that stone is set is
      responsibility. Because the abbess has the ultimate authority to make
      decisions alone, she ultimately has the responsibility, too. Try to
      shirk that and everyone suffers.

      Delegation does not end that responsibility. Give one man or woman
      that much power and the buck really does stop there. Hard saying, but
      St. Benedict cites Jesus Himself as remarking that more is required
      of those to whom so much has been committed. There may be elements
      that qualify and reduce that expectation of more, but there is no way
      to remove it altogether.

      Tucked in the folds of this portion is another warning. The abbot or
      parent must recall that they have undertaken a difficult and arduous
      task. One can wish to be an abbot or parent for utterly wrong
      reasons. Grace can overcome these, God sometimes lets us do the right
      thing for the wrong reason, but if the parent or abbot does not later
      cooperate with the grace, trouble ensues.

      Jesus washed feet, telling us He was giving us an example and
      mandate. (Why do you think the ceremony of foot washing got named
      "Mandatum"? That's where we got the English term "Maundy Thursday".)

      I think it's a safe bet that these days, when feet are most generally
      cleaned in tubs or showers, Jesus would be cleaning toilets. It just
      strikes me as what would be most like Him. Mothers and fathers can tell
      you that their authority requires them to clean a good deal more than just
      toilets! Parents and nurses who are faced with some of the most disgusting
      stuff to clean up can be absolutely certain that their hands are the hands of
      Christ in that moment.

      Wouldn't it be a better world if such loving humility was required of
      all authority? If Jesus could do it as God, what lesser official
      dares quibble with His standards?

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@...
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Don, for whom we prayed, has died without seeing the Priest. Ardent prayers for the repose of his soul and for his brother, Jim, his wife and family and
      Message 149 of 149 , Jun 6, 2010
        +PAX

        Don, for whom we prayed, has died without seeing the Priest. Ardent prayers for the repose of his soul and for his brother, Jim, his wife and family and all who mourn him.

        Kaitlin, whose test we prayed for has also been able to get out of the bad real estate deal she was enmeshed in. Deo gratias, and thanksgiving prayers!

        Lola, whose back surgery we prayed for, has now developed pain/numbness in her other leg. Unsure of the cause, possibly a bone chip or spur, they are taking her back to surgery this afternoon. Continued prayers, please, and for her brother, Richard and all their family.

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him. Thanks so much. JL

        February 6, June 7, October 7
        Chapter 7: On Humility

        The ninth degree of humility
        is that a monk restrain his tongue and keep silence,
        not speaking until he is questioned.
        For the Scripture shows
        that "in much speaking there is no escape from sin" (Prov. 10:19)
        and that "the talkative man is not stable on the earth" (Ps. 139:12).

        REFLECTION

        OK, if you are a parent, you cannot speak to your children only when
        they question you. The therapy bills in later years would be
        astronomical. There are many situations in a Benedictine life lived
        in the world, among non-monastics, where this has to be altered, but
        its kernel of truth must be discovered and maintained.

        WHY do we talk needlessly? Quite often it is nothing more than a
        trick to change the reality around us. We are bored, or we feel we
        are not getting enough attention or we think the mood too heavy, so
        we speak to change whatever annoys us at the moment. I should know.
        I am infamous for creating my own entertainment when things seem
        dull to me. That's not always a great idea...

        Some tough moments, some difficult stuff are meant to be endured.
        They are part of our necessary learning and growth. Ever notice how
        we assess a child's maturity by its ability to be quiet and non-
        fidgety in surroundings (like Church!) that do not spoon feed its
        attention span? Well, the same is true of us at every stage. We do
        ourselves harm if we defuse every single tense moment with a word or
        two. We cheat ourselves.

        All too often we speak only to remind the universe around us, which
        has carelessly forgotten for a second that we are its center, of a
        whole bevy of falsehoods: I am the cutest, smartest, or wittiest, I
        have the solution to all of this. What folly on the part of the
        entire cosmos to forget our importance! Better speak to clear the
        matter up...

        Those who know me are thinking: "HE wrote THIS?!?" Yes, alas, I am
        guilty of all I wrote. Three times a year the Holy Rule reminds me of
        that and each time I am aware that I need to work on it. Thanks be to
        God, the Rule IS read three times a year: usually by the time the
        next reading comes up, my interest has flagged and I have to start
        over. As for the part about the talkative not being "stable on the
        earth," well, there have been times in the last 18 years
        when God had to nail my feet to the floor to keep me faithful and I am
        not dead yet... I have not always been His most willing pupil, but
        oh, is He ever patient! And infinitely merciful!

        But, as one Desert Father said, that's what we do all day in
        monasteries: "We fall down and we get up."

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.