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Holy Rule for Dec. 20

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for the eternal rest of the following and for all their loved ones and all who mourn them: The sister of Deacon Bob. Jackie, for whom we
    Message 1 of 78 , Dec 19, 2009
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for the eternal rest of the following and for all their loved ones and all who mourn them:

      The sister of Deacon Bob.

      Jackie, for whom we prayed, and for her husband and family and for her best friend, Jennie and her family.

      Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      All those suffering depression or mourning a lost loved one at this season. May the Christ Child comfort and console them.

      Jennie's daughter, Angie, her husband, Justin and their children. Justin lost his job and now their car has broken down, very stressful time for them.

      Greg and his high school aged daughter. She has multiple serious behavior problems and really needs to know of God's love for her. Prayers, too, for Greg and her Mom and all the family.

      Ben. He is under a great deal of pressure on the job to do the wrong thing. So far he has held firm to his Christian beliefs. If he is able to resist for two more weeks, the crisis will be passed and the pressure should disappear.

      Another Greg, mental breakdown, hospitalized.

      Deo gratias, a woman for whom we prayed last year does not have glaucoma.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. ALl is mercy and
      grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      April 20, August 20, December 20
      Chapter 64: On Constituting an Abbess

      In the constituting of an Abbess
      let this plan always be followed,
      that the office be conferred on the one who is chosen
      either by the whole community unanimously in the fear of God
      or else by a part of the community, however small,
      if its counsel is more wholesome.

      Merit of life and wisdom of doctrine
      should determine the choice of the one to be constituted,
      even if she be the last of the order of the community.

      But if (which God forbid)
      the whole community should agree to choose a person
      who will acquiesce in their vices,
      and if those vices somehow become known to the Bishop
      to whose diocese the place belongs,
      or to the Abbots, Abbesses or the faithful of the vicinity,
      let them prevent the success of this conspiracy of the wicked,
      and set a worthy steward over the house of God.
      They may be sure
      that they will receive a good reward for this action
      if they do it with a pure intention and out of zeal for God;
      as, on the contrary, they will sin if they fail to do it.

      REFLECTION

      Monasteries can forget sometimes that they are not their own, one of
      the unavoidable risks of Benedictine autonomy. While it was usual, in
      St. Benedict's day, for monasteries to be under their local bishop
      (and still is usual in the East today,) St. Benedict says something
      even more telling. The local laity should intervene if the monastery
      conspires to elect a loser! Now THAT is going a long way!

      Monasteries become dear to those around them, and a sense of
      ownership for their local monastery arises in many hearts. St.
      Benedict actually endorses that. The monk is not his own, but neither
      is the whole community. We belong to the Church, we belong to our own
      locale, we belong to the people in a very special way. It entitles
      them to warn us that we may have gone amiss and it obliges us to
      always recall that our monasteries have ripple effects!

      Many of us in the workplace or school, some of us even in marriage,
      are forced to deal with people who were NOT chosen for their "merit
      of life and wisdom of doctrine." That can be very tough, but grace
      and the Holy Rule are there to strengthen us.

      The single most important thing the one governed can do to thwart bad
      government is NOT to mirror the behavior which is at fault. Two
      wrongs can never make a right. All too often, for whatever reason,
      people push our buttons and get exactly the sick response from us
      that they sickly need. Try not to let that happen. Put a control on
      your buttons. Never stoop to the level that annoys you, and believe
      me, that stooping is easy to do.

      Hard and perennial truth, but most of the things which annoy us most
      in others are our own sins, in one form or another.We might reflect those
      faults in different areas, in different ways, but this can only help
      us in denial. Look, look very carefully at the person who makes you
      the most angry. Most of us will not have to look honestly for very
      long to see why we are affected strongly.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA









      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • carmelitanum
      +PAX Please continue prays for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God s will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
      Message 78 of 78 , Oct 14, 2014
        +PAX


        Please continue prays for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome.


        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 14, June 15, October 15
        Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

        The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
        recited straight through without an antiphon.
        After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
        then Psalms 117 and 62,
        the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
        148-150);
        then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
        the responsory, the verse,
        the canticle from the Gospel book,
        the litany and so the end.

        REFLECTION

        Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances so the kids WON'T
        slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
        things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
        generally make it through the hoop!

        St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
        and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
        that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
        monastics may have time to gather.

        Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
        late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
        or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
        delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
        two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
        make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
        are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
        and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

        Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
        conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
        is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
        standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
        failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

        Take a self-inventory and check to see if there is anyone you dislike so
        intensely that they cannot be right, no matter what they do. If there are any
        such folks, it's time for you to change, not them! I recall, alas, one pastor
        who annoyed me so much that even when he used incense (something I ordinarily
        love,) I carped to myself that he didn't do it right. With me, he just could NOT
        win. Sigh... When things get that bad, it's ourselves who need the overhaul,
        not the presumed "offender."

        St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
        shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
        about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
        or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
        should pass it on!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA


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