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Holy Rule for Dec. 1

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX HUGE Deo gratias, Fr. Nigel, for whom we prayed, had swine flu and was in a coma for 41 days and docs had done all they could do. Then he recovered! God
    Message 1 of 78 , Nov 30, 2009
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      +PAX

      HUGE Deo gratias, Fr. Nigel, for whom we prayed, had swine flu and was in a coma for 41 days and docs had done all they could do. Then he recovered! God is good! Thanks to all for their prayers.

      Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of Fr. Jude, who needs a kidney transplant, and for his parishoner and all his love one and all who take care of him.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
      grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      April 1, August 1, December 1

      Chapter 50: On Sisters Who are Working Far From the Oratory or Are on
      a Journey

      Those sisters who are working at a great distance
      and cannot get to the oratory at the proper time --
      the Abbess judging that such is the case --
      shall perform the Work of God
      in the place where they are working,
      bending their knees in reverence before God.

      Likewise those who have been sent on a journey
      shall not let the appointed Hours pass by,
      but shall say the Office by themselves as well as they can
      and not neglect to render the task of their service.

      REFLECTION

      Look, if you think your marriage vows take a powder while you're
      traveling on business, chances are a lot of people pity your spouse.
      There are jobs that we do not carry with us. We are not surgeons,
      welders or toll booth ticket-takers at home- at least hopefully! But
      marriage is not a job, it's a vocation and so is monastic life.
      Vocations stay with one everywhere, at all times and places. One is
      ALWAYS a spouse, always a parent, always a monastic.

      Hey, it is World AIDS Day, and there are a lot of similarities
      between monasticism done right and HIV. I should know- I've been HIV+
      for nearly 21 years and a monk for nearly 18. For rather crass starters,
      both get in your blood and if they do, there is no cure! Done right,
      both are always with you. Since my diagnosis, even in my dreams,
      I am always HIV+, never once have I dreamed of my current self
      otherwise. I wish I could say exactly the same of monasticism, but
      even there, my dreams that are not flashbacks are most usually about
      Jerome, not my secular name, Phil!

      Writ large across my heart are the letters "HIV" and I am still
      working on making "OSB" stand out in equally high relief there! At
      some point, if we are lucky, we realize that our vocation really is
      who we've become.

      Virus and vows! Believe me, there were times I wished I had neither, but I
      always have both! Most of the time, I am glad of that, in very mysterious
      ways, mysteriously grateful for both. In my case, at least, neither
      would have been my totally free first choice, but they are undeniably
      where God has placed me and both have done me a world of good, most
      often through their hassles, but also through their ordinary days!
      I would not give up what either has taught me for anything in the world.

      We live in a secular society that urges us to follow our dreams.
      Well, m'dears, I have swooned at the poetry in that one for more
      decades than I care to admit, but it ain't always true. Why on earth
      should we ascribe an infallibility to our own dreams that we are
      unwilling under any but the most exceptionally extreme circumstances
      to apply to anyone else? Whoops! There's a real passing chance our
      dreams may be wrong, may have to be given up. I am living proof to
      myself that fighting that surrender is terribly hard and just as
      useless. Yes, choice often enters into whom we become, but not
      always, and sometimes the things that become us are the ones we quite
      pointedly have NOT chosen.

      Many of us do not choose what life hands us. Some do not choose to be
      parents, some choose one spouse only to find that person changes
      horrifically later on and nobody in their right mind chooses to
      become HIV+. Many, many things are in some ways forced upon us, but
      those things can become fully graced things of wonder, if only we let
      God work. If only we would trust Him... His Divine Mercy will triumph
      over all, but we must trust Him. He knows, after all, what He is doing!
      We often can only see His work in hindsight, looking back.

      Love and prayers,

      Jerome Leo, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • carmelitanum
      +PAX Please continue prays for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God s will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
      Message 78 of 78 , Oct 14, 2014
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        +PAX


        Please continue prays for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome.


        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 14, June 15, October 15
        Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

        The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
        recited straight through without an antiphon.
        After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
        then Psalms 117 and 62,
        the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
        148-150);
        then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
        the responsory, the verse,
        the canticle from the Gospel book,
        the litany and so the end.

        REFLECTION

        Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances so the kids WON'T
        slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
        things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
        generally make it through the hoop!

        St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
        and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
        that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
        monastics may have time to gather.

        Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
        late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
        or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
        delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
        two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
        make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
        are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
        and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

        Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
        conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
        is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
        standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
        failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

        Take a self-inventory and check to see if there is anyone you dislike so
        intensely that they cannot be right, no matter what they do. If there are any
        such folks, it's time for you to change, not them! I recall, alas, one pastor
        who annoyed me so much that even when he used incense (something I ordinarily
        love,) I carped to myself that he didn't do it right. With me, he just could NOT
        win. Sigh... When things get that bad, it's ourselves who need the overhaul,
        not the presumed "offender."

        St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
        shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
        about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
        or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
        should pass it on!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA


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