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Holy Rule for Oct. 22

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Sheila s mom, an
    Message 1 of 78 , Oct 21, 2009
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Sheila's mom, an elderly lady who's had dementia and chronic back pain for a long time, and is now near death. For her happy death and for all who will mourn her.

      Elaine's husband who recently had a small stroke, and for Elaine.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's
      will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise
      Him! Thanks so much. JL


      February 21, June 22, October 22
      Chapter 18: In What Order the Psalms Are to Be Said

      Let this verse be said: "Incline unto my aid, O God; O Lord, make
      haste to help me,"
      and the "Glory be to the Father" then the hymn proper to each Hour.


      Then at Prime on Sunday four sections of Psalm 118 are to be said;
      and at each of the remaining Hours, that is Terce, Sext and None,
      three sections of the same Psalm 118.

      At Prime on Monday let three Psalms be said, namely Psalms 1, 2 and
      6. And so each day at Prime until Sunday let three Psalms be said
      in numerical order, to Psalm 19,
      but with Psalms 9 and 17 each divided into two parts. Thus it comes
      about that the Night Office on Sunday always begins with Psalm 20.


      REFLECTION

      Since Prime was to be said before work, its Psalms could vary. The
      Tuesday through Saturday repetition of the same 9 Psalms for minor
      hours excludes Prime, which was probably said in Church or Chapter
      room, or partially in both. Since Prime was celebrated where books
      were available, it could use different Psalms every day and did.
      There was no need for the memorization which would allow farmer
      monks to celebrate None in the midst of a hayfield.

      I was glad to hear from some who especially loved the prayers of
      Prime. So do I! Here, however, is yet another offering from the
      Office of Prime: its hymn. Being metrical, it is easily memorized.
      A nurse friend of mine told me years ago she used to sing this hymn
      every morning at an Episcopal summer camp for kids. Not a bad idea
      at all! Enjoy!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA 01366

      HYMN

      Now that the daylight fills the sky
      We lift our hearts to God on high,
      That He, in all we do or say,
      Would keep us free from harm today:

      Would guard our hearts and tongues from strife;
      From anger's din would hide our life;
      From evil sights would turn our eyes;
      Would close our ears to vanities.

      So we, when this new day is gone
      and night in turn is drawing on,
      With conscience by the world unstained
      Shall praise His name for vict'ry gained.

      To God the Father and the Son
      And Holy Spirit, three in one,
      Be endless glory as before
      The world began, so evermore. Amen.







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • carmelitanum
      +PAX Please continue prays for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God s will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
      Message 78 of 78 , Oct 14, 2014
        +PAX


        Please continue prays for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome.


        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 14, June 15, October 15
        Chapter 12: How the Morning Office Is to Be Said

        The Morning Office on Sunday shall begin with Psalm 66
        recited straight through without an antiphon.
        After that let Psalm 50 be said with "Alleluia,"
        then Psalms 117 and 62,
        the Canticle of Blessing (Benedicite) and the Psalms of praise (Ps.
        148-150);
        then a lesson from the Apocalypse to be recited by heart,
        the responsory, the verse,
        the canticle from the Gospel book,
        the litany and so the end.

        REFLECTION

        Ever notice how a loving parent makes allowances so the kids WON'T
        slip up or be discouraged? Good teachers do the same thing. Some
        things are made so deliberately easy that all of the students can
        generally make it through the hoop!

        St. Benedict does this with both morning Offices, beginning Vigils
        and Lauds with 2 psalms that are said every day. He even stresses
        that, at Lauds, the 66th Psalm is to be said slowly, so that the
        monastics may have time to gather.

        Those two Offices are the time people are most likely to be running
        late, either because they had to bound out of bed at the last minute,
        or because the "necessities of nature" break between Vigils and Lauds
        delayed them unexpectedly. It is worth noting that only with these
        two Offices, when tardiness can so easily occur, does the Holy Rule
        make such allowance. For a further bit of trivia, these four Psalms
        are repeated every day: one could miss them several times in a week
        and still have said all 150 Psalms in that week.

        Sometimes people (including, alas, ourselves!) can make unrealistic
        conditions and demand that others meet them. The concept of failure
        is built into those demands. We fence people about with our own
        standards that they could not possibly meet, then condemn them for
        failing to meet them! What a sad and tragic game.

        Take a self-inventory and check to see if there is anyone you dislike so
        intensely that they cannot be right, no matter what they do. If there are any
        such folks, it's time for you to change, not them! I recall, alas, one pastor
        who annoyed me so much that even when he used incense (something I ordinarily
        love,) I carped to myself that he didn't do it right. With me, he just could NOT
        win. Sigh... When things get that bad, it's ourselves who need the overhaul,
        not the presumed "offender."

        St. Benedict, by his example, teaches us to be the exact opposite. He
        shows us that we should be gentle and loving, that we should not be
        about setting burdens on others that are guaranteed to make them fail
        or quit or be discouraged. If we have received such kindness, we
        should pass it on!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA


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