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Brother Jerome's Reflection: Oct 12

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  • michael_oblate (aka carmelitanum)
    +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Over 2.5 million
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 11, 2009
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      +PAX



      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:


      Over 2.5 million people have been forced from their homes by heavy rains and flooding in Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh in South India. Caritas India says it fears the worst is still to come, with more rains in the forecast threatening to overflow river banks and dams. With the Krishna River inundated, over 50 villages have been completely submerged or marooned in Andhra Pradesh.

      Also, those suffering from the terrible monsoon in the Philippines.


      +Please pray that Divine Mercy will shine upon all those who have taken their own lives.+


      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
      grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      February 11, June 12, October 12
      Chapter 9: How Many Psalms Are to Be Said at the Night Office

      In winter time as defined above,
      there is first this verse to be said three times:
      "O Lord, open my lips,
      and my mouth shall declare Your praise."
      To it is added Psalm 3 and the "Glory be to the Father,"
      and after that Psalm 94 to be chanted with an antiphon
      or even chanted simply.
      Let the Ambrosian hymn follow next,
      and then six Psalms with antiphons.
      When these are finished and the verse said,
      let the Abbot give a blessing;
      then, all being seated on the benches,
      let three lessons be read from the book on the lectern
      by the brethren in their turns,
      and after each lesson let a responsory be chanted.
      Two of the responsories are to be said
      without a "Glory be to the Father"
      but after the third lesson
      let the chanter say the "Glory be to the Father,"
      and as soon as he begins it let all rise from their seats
      out of honor and reverence to the Holy Trinity.


      The books to be read at the Night Office
      shall be those of divine authorship,
      of both the Old and the New Testament,
      and also the explanations of them which have been made
      by well known and orthodox Catholic Fathers.


      After these three lessons with their responsories
      let the remaining six Psalms follow,
      to be chanted with "Alleluia."
      After these shall follow the lesson from the Apostle,
      to be recited by heart,
      the verse
      and the petition of the litany, that is "Lord, have mercy on us."
      And so let the Night Office come to an end.

      REFLECTION

      There is an unfortunate and perennial heresy among would-be
      liturgists, even some Benedictines, which holds that if it's long,
      its good. Not so, and quite evidently not so to St. Benedict, either.
      The order he prescribes for Vigils is almost exactly half the length
      of the Roman cathedral Office of his time.

      St. Benedict was very serious about monasticism, but he also wanted
      to shorten the Office, which was obviously of central importance to
      him. Why? I think he aimed, once again, at balance, at moderation and
      at gentleness. His monastics were farmers, not wealthy cathedral
      prelates with servants and benefices. They would have dropped rather
      quickly from fatigue had he imposed the Roman Office of the time on
      them.

      There is a great message of moderation here for Oblates. St. Benedict
      knw that ALL of one's work and life is prayer.
      Figuratively speaking, if your life and primary vocation has left you
      with cows to milk, for heavens sake (literally!) go milk 'em!

      Our Office, for every monastic, from Abbot Primate down to newest
      Oblate novice, must be a harmonious part of our life. We are not
      called to the excesses of Cluny, whose monks were in choir most of
      the time, adding ever more and more gee-gaws and trinkets to the
      Office. If one's children or spouse or work calls one to do less,
      answer that call. No one is called to be a choir athlete, at it all
      the time.

      If illness or disability limit what you can do, do what you can and bless God
      for what you cannot! He knows what He is about. The Fathers taught that
      illness or other physical challenges, even just aging, took the place
      of stringent penances performed by the healthy and well. Whatever the
      limits imposed by bodily problems, they themselves became penance
      and asceticism for the monastic.

      In long dealings with Oblates I have frequently heard this issue
      raised: saying the whole Office. That is fine, and some lives,
      notably single ones, might make it possible. Other lives, lives
      founded on sacraments like marriage, might well not. Trying to amend
      one's primary, sacramental vocation to be a monastic in the world
      misses the point. That primary vocation is part and parcel of HOW one
      becomes a monastic in the world. Tamper with it and you mess up the
      entire picture.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      St. Mary's Monastery
      Petersham, MA
    • carmelitanum
      +PAX Please continue prayers for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome. Prayers please for Jamie D who will undergo surgery in two weeks for the removal of a
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 11, 2014
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        +PAX


        Please continue prayers for the recovery of our good Brother Jerome.

        Prayers please for Jamie D who will undergo surgery in two weeks for the removal of a cyst near her brain.

        Prayers please for Anne, 98, kidneys have started to fail and is hospitalized. Pray for God's Holy will.


        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 11, June 12, October 12
        Chapter 9: How Many Psalms Are to Be Said at the Night Office

        In winter time as defined above,
        there is first this verse to be said three times:
        "O Lord, open my lips,
        and my mouth shall declare Your praise."
        To it is added Psalm 3 and the "Glory be to the Father,"
        and after that Psalm 94 to be chanted with an antiphon
        or even chanted simply.
        Let the Ambrosian hymn follow next,
        and then six Psalms with antiphons.
        When these are finished and the verse said,
        let the Abbot give a blessing;
        then, all being seated on the benches,
        let three lessons be read from the book on the lectern
        by the brethren in their turns,
        and after each lesson let a responsory be chanted.
        Two of the responsories are to be said
        without a "Glory be to the Father"
        but after the third lesson
        let the chanter say the "Glory be to the Father,"
        and as soon as he begins it let all rise from their seats
        out of honor and reverence to the Holy Trinity.


        The books to be read at the Night Office
        shall be those of divine authorship,
        of both the Old and the New Testament,
        and also the explanations of them which have been made
        by well known and orthodox Catholic Fathers.


        After these three lessons with their responsories
        let the remaining six Psalms follow,
        to be chanted with "Alleluia."
        After these shall follow the lesson from the Apostle,
        to be recited by heart,
        the verse
        and the petition of the litany, that is "Lord, have mercy on us."
        And so let the Night Office come to an end.

        REFLECTION

        There is an unfortunate and perennial heresy among would-be
        liturgists which holds that if it's long,
        its good. Not so, and quite evidently not so to St. Benedict, either.
        The order he prescribes for Vigils is almost exactly half the length
        of the Roman cathedral Office of his time.

        St. Benedict was very serious about monasticism, but he also wanted
        to shorten the Office, which was obviously of central importance to
        him. Why? I think he aimed, once again, at balance, at moderation and
        at gentleness. His monastics were farmers, not wealthy cathedral
        prelates with servants and benefices. They would have dropped rather
        quickly from fatigue had he imposed the Roman Office of the time on
        them.

        There is a great message of moderation here for Oblates. St. Benedict
        knew that ALL of one's work and life is prayer.
        Figuratively speaking, if your life and primary vocation has left you
        with cows to milk, for heavens sake (literally!) go milk 'em!

        Our Office, for every monastic, from Abbot Primate down to newest
        Oblate novice, must be a harmonious part of our life. We are not
        called to the excesses of Cluny, whose monks were in choir most of
        the time, adding ever more and more gee-gaws and trinkets to the
        Office. If one's children or spouse calls one to do less, answer that call.

        If illness or disability limit what you can do, do what you can and bless God
        for what you cannot! He knows what He is about. The Fathers taught that
        illness or other physical challenges, even just aging, took the place
        of stringent penances performed by the healthy and well. Whatever the
        limits imposed by bodily problems, they themselves became penance
        and asceticism for the monastic.

        In long dealings with Oblates I have frequently heard this issue
        raised: saying the whole Office. That is fine, and some lives,
        notably single ones, might make it possible. Other lives, lives
        founded on sacraments like marriage, might well not. Trying to amend
        one's primary, sacramental vocation to be a monastic in the world
        misses the point. That primary vocation is part and parcel of HOW one
        becomes a monastic in the world. Tamper with it and you mess up the
        entire picture.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        St. Mary's Monastery - the Benedictine monks of Petersham, MA USA.

         


        St. Mary's Monastery
        Petersham, MA


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