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Holy Rule for May 12

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving: Michael, the Marine we prayed for in Iraq, has come safely home. Natalie, whose job search we prayed for, has
    Message 1 of 209 , May 11, 2009
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      +PAX

      Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving:

      Michael, the Marine we prayed for in Iraq, has come safely home.

      Natalie, whose job search we prayed for, has found a job two miles from her home.

      Bill, who made his final oblation recently.Prayers for him and the vocation God has given him.

      Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      For J, who feels his professional vocation is called in doubt by some evaluation: that he may be able to distinguish between illusions and truth, and draw the conclusions that are necessary...


      Carol and for her students who will take their AP Chemistry exam on Tuesday. Pray that they are not too stressed, and that they PASS!!!

      for the safe delivery of Kathy's 8th grand baby, Alicia Nichole and the quick and safe recovery of her daughter Amanda. Also for the safe travel of her son in-law who was sent home from Iraq for the "emergency" event. (It was shaping up to be an emergency due to Amanda's and the baby's health.)

      Prayers, please, for Dave, on his birthday. Ad multos annos and many more!

      Lord, help
      us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is
      never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      January 11, May 12, September 11
      Chapter 2: What Kind of Person the Abbess Ought to Be

      Therefore, when anyone receives the name of Abbess,
      she ought to govern her disciples with a twofold teaching.
      That is to say,
      she should show them all that is good and holy
      by her deeds even more than by her words,
      expounding the Lord's commandments in words
      to the intelligent among her disciples,
      but demonstrating the divine precepts by her actions
      for those of harder hearts and ruder minds.
      And whatever she has taught her disciples
      to be contrary to God's law,
      let her indicate by her example that it is not to be done,
      lest, while preaching to others, she herself be found reprobate (1
      Cor. 9:27),
      and lest God one day say to her in her sin,
      "Why do you declare My statutes
      and profess My covenant with your lips,
      whereas you hate discipline
      and have cast My words behind you" (Ps. 49:16-17)?
      And again,
      "You were looking at the speck in your brother's eye,
      and did not see the beam in your own" (Matt. 7:3).

      REFLECTION

      This isn't just for abbots and parents, this is for all of us.
      Example is put forward as the primary means of teaching, even before
      words. All of us must "walk the talk" and practice what we preach.
      Everyone of us is obliged to somehow uncover the splendor of the City
      of God in our lives, to show it to others. Mere verbal description
      will be of little help in comparison to actually living out the vision.

      I remember many of my parents' words, we all do. When I am really
      trying to gauge my behavior according to their standards, however, it
      is often not words that I hear in my mind. I think of how they would
      have acted in a given situation. If their behavior shames me at my own
      planned response, I usually try to follow their plan of action, not
      mine. Like everyone, however, I am not perfect and do not always
      choose the higher road that memory of them shows me. Sad...

      All of us put forward an image of who we are in words, one way or
      another. As years go by, we usually get a more or less complete
      picture of who we are and of the self we wish to present to the
      world. This is where family, community and marriage can be so
      important.

      The people who live with us, see right through the flaws
      in our verbal picture. It is less easy for us to believe in our grand
      images of ourselves when we are rubbing shoulders with one or more
      reality checks all the time! These reality checks can point out
      genuine greatness in areas we might not have expected, but they can
      also underscore the pathetic comedy of our pretensions.
      Both are useful for humility, both lead to truth. Those pointing out
      our flaws are no more infallible than we are, but they can often be a
      lot more objective.

      Ever watch a foreign film with the audio badly dubbed into another
      language? It is jarring and annoying. What St. Benedict is saying to
      all of us here is to get the picture and the sound into synchronized
      form. For all Christians, all Benedictines, there should be no
      disparity between video and audio! Lofty ideal that!

      St. Benedict knew that loftiness would be hard for us to reach, too.
      He knew there would be beams in our eyes, specks in others'. Hence, a
      lot of this boils down to approach and attitude. Come on to others
      from a position of "I'm OK and you are not," and see where it gets
      you. You might make a temporary dent. You might even change a few of
      the really less than bright.

      Most wise people, however, will give you a lot of room. They see the
      mask, the falsity there, and it inhibits much else from getting through to
      them. It's like really competent actors being cast in a role that does
      not fit them at all. One sits through the whole movie thinking: "No way
      can I believe that she is so-and-so!" "Great play, nice plot, but I didn't find
      the male lead credible..."

      Hopefully, at that final Awards night, there will be Tony's, Emmies
      and Oscars for all of us, with maybe a Golden Globe or two thrown
      into our totals!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      I have no idea why this didn t go through yesterday. Catching up. BJL +PAX Prayers for the grace-filled success of our Oblate Day and our Sisters Monastic
      Message 209 of 209 , Mar 14, 2015
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        I have no idea why this didn't go through yesterday. Catching up. BJL
         
        +PAX
        Prayers for the grace-filled success of our Oblate Day and our Sisters' Monastic Experience weekend at Petersham and for all participating.
         
        Urgent prayers needed for Brian's brother-in-law, Paul. He is a diabetic, and now has been diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer. It is stage 3, and a biopsy this coming Tuesday will check to see if he is stage 4. He will be starting chemo & radiation. His wife is devastated. Brian has known Paul since they were very young, loves him like a brother and is crushed. Please pray for Paul, his wife, Brian and all their family and friends.
        Deo gratias, the twin's fluid build up is gone.

        Prayer for Brian T.,( another Brian,) who is being viciously harrassed.

        Prayers for JS, discernment and assistance in making an important life decision.

        Prayers for Beverly, special intention plus dicernment regarding another of perplexing issues..

        Deo gratias for all prayers and graces of the past.
        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 14, July 14, November 13
        Chapter 35: On the Weekly Servers in the Kitchen

        An hour before the meal let the weekly servers each receive a drink
        and some bread over and above the appointed allowance, in order
        that at the meal time they may serve their brethren without
        murmuring and without excessive fatigue. On solemn days, however,
        let them wait until after Mass.

        Immediately after the Morning Office on Sunday, the incoming and
        outgoing servers shall prostrate themselves before all the brethren
        in the oratory and ask their prayers. Let the server who is ending
        his week say this verse: "Blessed are You, O Lord God, who have
        helped me and consoled me." When this has been said three times and
        the outgoing server has received his blessing, then let the
        incoming server follow and say, "Incline unto my aid, O God; O
        Lord, make haste to help me." Let this also be repeated three times
        by all, and having received his blessing let him enter his service.

        REFLECTION

        Families, and parents and caregivers, listen up! There's an
        important lesson here. No task is too small to be blessed by
        prayer. More than that, no task is so easy that it can be done
        without God's help, so remember to thank Him. Of ourselves, we can
        do nothing, literally nothing. All our strength and power comes from God.

        Making dinner or washing the dishes? Take a quiet moment in the
        midst of either to say "Help!" and "Thanks!" Two simple, one word
        prayers. No matter how chaotic your household, everyone will find
        time for at least that. God knows the details, knows your heart and
        can readily fill in the blanks! We may think God needs essay-length
        prayers, but He doesn't. He may enjoy hearing from us, but trust
        me, we NEVER tell Him anything that's news to Him.

        This chapter is not simply the humility and charity of service, it
        is also the honest acknowledgment of complete helplessness without
        God. For most folks, only sickness or debility will teach them
        that. It may seem like nothing to bend down and pick up a pin off
        the floor until a bad back makes that impossible. Handicaps hone
        our perceptions of being in charge very, very well.

        Of course, there is another side to simple things like serving
        table, picking up pins and the like. One could not have done
        anything without God's help, but ah, if one does them out of love
        and care! Bingo! Double coupons, so to speak! If that pin got
        carefully picked up because of a barefoot and running child, or a
        beloved pet who is prone to "tasting" whatever she can find on the
        floor, simplicity becomes a very much greater matter, indeed. Now
        it is very close to the heart of God, and that is a wonderful place
        to be.

        By the way, though some might think me daft for saying this, it is
        not at all that crazy. There is no reason why families could not
        bless whomever is assigned to a domestic task for a week or month
        or whatever. A simple prayer asking God to help them serve us all
        and get over any rough times could be tastefully done without a lot
        of fuss. This could really help drive home the message of the worthwhile
        merit to be had in doing small things with love!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA
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