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Holy Rule for May 9

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Philippe, 52, and for all his family and all who mourn him, especially his sister, Carine.
    Message 1 of 211 , May 8, 2009
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Philippe, 52, and for all his family and all who mourn him, especially his sister, Carine.

      Prayers, pleas, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Doug, for healing of a diabetic ulcer causing him systemic problems.

      Patrick, suffering from a rare form of a skin disease. It can disfigure his face if not stopped.

      a 12 year old girl, she's been sexually and emotionally abused, she's sexually active and uses drugs, and runs away frequently from her state home... may she find God's peace and way in her troubled world.

      St. Bede's choir for their Sunday program.

      John, test shows a shadow on his liver, more tests to follow.

      Betty's mother-in-law, pacemaker being inserted.

      S., severe pain and terrible depression.

      Prayers, please, for Fr. Bob, who gave me the job at the wonderful mission I
      write about today, and for all the people there. The little Church is now sadly
      closed, but what a beautifully important chapter in my life it was and is.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will.
      God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him!
      Thanks so much. JL

      January 8, May 9, September 8
      Chapter 1: On the Kinds of Monks

      It is well known that there are four kinds of monks.
      The first kind are the Cenobites:
      those who live in monasteries
      and serve under a rule and an Abbot.

      The second kind are the Anchorites or Hermits:
      those who,
      no longer in the first fervor of their reformation,
      but after long probation in a monastery,
      having learned by the help of many brethren
      how to fight against the devil,
      go out well armed from the ranks of the community
      to the solitary combat of the desert.
      They are able now,
      with no help save from God,
      to fight single-handed against the vices of the flesh
      and their own evil thoughts.

      The third kind of monks, a detestable kind, are the Sarabaites.
      These, not having been tested,
      as gold in the furnace (Wis. 3:6),
      by any rule or by the lessons of experience,
      are as soft as lead.
      In their works they still keep faith with the world,
      so that their tonsure marks them as liars before God.
      They live in twos or threes, or even singly,
      without a shepherd,
      in their own sheepfolds and not in the Lord's.
      Their law is the desire for self-gratification:
      whatever enters their mind or appeals to them,
      that they call holy;
      what they dislike, they regard as unlawful.

      The fourth kind of monks are those called Gyrovagues.
      These spend their whole lives tramping from province to province,
      staying as guests in different monasteries
      for three or four days at a time.
      Always on the move, with no stability,
      they indulge their own wills
      and succumb to the allurements of gluttony,
      and are in every way worse than the Sarabaites.
      Of the miserable conduct of all such
      it is better to be silent than to speak.

      Passing these over, therefore,
      let us proceed, with God's help,
      to lay down a rule for the strongest kind of monks,the Cenobites.

      REFLECTION

      What are the two major things that St. Benedict dislikes about the
      bad types of monk? They have no stability and they follow their own
      wills. Obedience is the essence of monastic struggle, and we will be
      touching on it throughout the Holy Rule. Stability, while getting
      lots of mention, deservedly takes a lesser role in the Rule, even
      though it is taken as a vow by Benedictines, so it might pay to take
      a closer look at stability right at the beginning of our reading of
      the Rule.

      The Desert Fathers said: "Stay in your cell and your cell will teach
      you everything." Real cinch, right? Wrong! Don't picture staying in
      one's cell like a personal day from work, when you sleep as late as
      you like, get dressed at noon (if then!) and decide you can eat for
      the day without leaving the house to go to the store or, for that
      matter, without leaving the couch. That's not what this is about.

      Monastics, whether in the world or in the cloister, could tell you
      that the cell, the home can be paradise, but it can also be hell, a
      furnace of nearly impossible heat. In fact, for many of us, it has
      been both at one time or another, and maybe, just maybe, it isn't
      done switching roles yet! Times of paradise are nice, they can swell
      the heart with gratitude and love, but every spouse, parent, child
      and religious knows that we cannot stay on the mountaintop forever,
      like Peter, we may not pitch tents there.

      The furnace, now there's a fetching little image! But it is
      essential, too. Benedictine life seeks to lead us to God. For every
      single one of us, that means cleaning out a lot of imperfection. We
      may start out eagerly wanting to be like "gold tried in the furnace,
      seven times refined," but it's a safe bet that early on, after a time
      or two in that inferno, we'll be trying to bargain for less, maybe
      four or five times refined at most! It's no debutante's ball in there!

      Hate the furnace/gold imagery? Can't blame you there, especially if
      you live in the North and furnaces are tricky and expensive worries!
      Try a sauna. Still hard, still challenging, still sweats a LOT of
      gunk out. However, make sure you jump in the ice cold water right after
      the sauna, just so you don't think all this stuff is REALLY a spa!

      The fact is, for Benedictines, stability, whether of cloister or
      geography or of heart, is a major piece of the puzzle. It's the
      ability to stick with it, stay in there, keep trying. It is the
      fixedness, not just of place, but of heart and will. It is more than
      just not moving around.

      A consumerist society is fueled by desire, change and variety. Small
      wonder that it encourages us to be always moving, always seeking the
      novel, always distracted: it's profit base depends on that and,
      whatever else may be said, consumerism is a greedy little devil.

      Stability flies in the face of all these falsehoods. It tells us
      that "rut" and routine are two very different things for us. The
      routine, the mundane, the everyday and predictable are precisely the
      arenas in which we must strive and win in the spiritual life.

      The summer I left the seminary, I was 36. I lived in an idyllic place,
      way out in the country, only a few miles from the West Virginia
      border. Gorgeous! Geese and goats right next door, a small garden, a
      tiny Byzantine Church on the property that I took care of and where I
      was cantor.

      That last summer, when I decided not to go back, I fell
      in love. Not just a little, a LOT, way head over heels.
      The idyllic surroundings became even lovelier,
      they sang and all seemed right with the world. I was in Eden.
      Or so I thought...

      When the romance angle all blew up in my face, I was every bit as
      inconsolable as I had recently been ecstatic. The same place looked
      ugly and boring and hot, I couldn't care less about the geese and
      goats I loved and I let the garden go to pieces. Why? Perception. It
      was the same Eden, my eyes and heart had changed.

      Stability teaches us that. Our fleeting hells have heaven within them
      and our Edens can turn into Dead Seas overnight. Stability forces us
      to stick with it, to weather those changes, to know EVERY side of
      life and love and heart and place. No wonder St. Benedict loved it
      so! It is the courage of which monastics are made!

      I failed the test of that lovely rural stability over twenty years ago,
      but my heart still remembers the nights I sat on the porch and watched the
      thousands of fireflies' swirling progress upward on the field beside
      me, a nightly Theophany, a manifestation of God. They made me think
      of souls, rising on the last day. Awesome! Sure I am that I did not
      belong in the priesthood, but oh, how wrong I could be
      when disenchanted with that place. My heart goes back there still and
      I pray for that community every single day of my life.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • russophile2002
      +PAX Many ardent prayers for Mario, substance abuse problem and getting help and treatment, may he stay clean and sober. Prayers, too, for his parents, D. and
      Message 211 of 211 , Mar 13, 2017

        +PAX

         

        Many ardent prayers for Mario, substance abuse problem and getting help and treatment, may he stay clean and sober. Prayers, too, for his parents, D. and M. and all his family.

         

        Prayers for Kristen, young wife & mother with serious cancer. Parishioners are praying to Ven. Rose Hawthorne for a miracle.

         

        Prayers for Diana and her daughter, Diana left the Church long ago, prayers that they both may return.

         

        Many ardent prayers for Steve, in hospice, that he may get all the Sacraments, and for his wife and family and all who will mourn him. Divine Mercy chaplets, please, from those so inclined.

         

        Prayers for the eternal rest of Kathy, who died in her sleep, and strength for her husband, Mark and for their family. Kathy was a very devout prayer warrior.

         

        Continued ardent prayers for Josh, drug problems and hopefully already in treatment.

         

        Prayers for Patty, 56, who has been home battling bacterial pneumonia for over a week.

         

        Prayers for the eternal rest of 35 girls killed in a fire at a state-run home for youth in Guatemala, and for their families and all who mourn them. Prayers, too, for the other girls at that facility, where allegations of abuse have prompted riots from those housed there.

         

        Prayers for a man estranged from his children for many years, that they resume contact with him.

        Prayers for E., that she go to Confession, also for Liz, that she go to Confession. It has been many years for both.

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 14, July 14, November 13
        Chapter 35: On the Weekly Servers in the Kitchen

        An hour before the meal let the weekly servers each receive a drink
        and some bread over and above the appointed allowance, in order
        that at the meal time they may serve their brethren without
        murmuring and without excessive fatigue. On solemn days, however,
        let them wait until after Mass.

        Immediately after the Morning Office on Sunday, the incoming and
        outgoing servers shall prostrate themselves before all the brethren
        in the oratory and ask their prayers. Let the server who is ending
        his week say this verse: "Blessed are You, O Lord God, who have
        helped me and consoled me." When this has been said three times and
        the outgoing server has received his blessing, then let the
        incoming server follow and say, "Incline unto my aid, O God; O
        Lord, make haste to help me." Let this also be repeated three times
        by all, and having received his blessing let him enter his service.

        REFLECTION

        Families, and parents and caregivers, listen up! There's an
        important lesson here. No task is too small to be blessed by
        prayer. More than that, no task is so easy that it can be done
        without God's help, so remember to thank Him. Of ourselves, we can
        do nothing, literally nothing. All our strength and power comes from God.

        Making dinner or washing the dishes? Take a quiet moment in the
        midst of either to say "Help!" and "Thanks!" Two simple, one word
        prayers. No matter how chaotic your household, everyone will find
        time for at least that. God knows the details, knows your heart and
        can readily fill in the blanks! We may think God needs essay-length
        prayers, but He doesn't. He may enjoy hearing from us, but trust
        me, we NEVER tell Him anything that's news to Him.

        This chapter is not simply the humility and charity of service, it
        is also the honest acknowledgment of complete helplessness without
        God. For most folks, only sickness or debility will teach them
        that. It may seem like nothing to bend down and pick up a pin off
        the floor until a bad back makes that impossible. Handicaps hone
        our perceptions of being in charge very, very well.

        Of course, there is another side to simple things like serving
        table, picking up pins and the like. One could not have done
        anything without God's help, but ah, if one does them out of love
        and care! Bingo! Double coupons, so to speak! If that pin got
        carefully picked up because of a barefoot and running child, or a
        beloved pet who is prone to "tasting" whatever she can find on the
        floor, simplicity becomes a very much greater matter, indeed. Now
        it is very close to the heart of God, and that is a wonderful place
        to be.

        By the way, though some might think me daft for saying this, it is
        not at all that crazy. There is no reason why families could not
        bless whomever is assigned to a domestic task for a week or month
        or whatever. A simple prayer asking God to help them serve us all
        and get over any rough times could be tastefully done without a lot
        of fuss. This could really help drive home the message of the worthwhile
        merit to be had in doing small things with love!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

         


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