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Holy Rule for May 3

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for all our Jameses and Philips on their patronal feastday, many graces and many more! Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of:
    Message 1 of 209 , May 2, 2009
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for all our Jameses and Philips on their patronal feastday, many graces and many more!

      Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of:

      Jim, 68, and for his family and all who mourn him.

      Another Jim, 41, and for his family and all who mourn him

      Ann, 53, and for her husband, Heshy and all their family, all who mourn her.

      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the folloiwng, for all their loved ones and all taking care of them:

      R. and M. and their son, and grandchildren. Many changes going on in their lives just now. Prayers, too, for R's Mom.

      Aaron, neck surgery on two of his ruptured discs, two more are not being treated at this time.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
      grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      January 2, May 3, September 2
      Prologue (continued)

      Let us arise, then, at last,
      for the Scripture stirs us up, saying,
      "Now is the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom. 18:11).
      Let us open our eyes to the deifying light,
      let us hear with attentive ears
      the warning which the divine voice cries daily to us,
      "Today if you hear His voice,
      harden not your hearts" (Ps. 94:8).
      And again,
      "Whoever has ears to hear,
      hear what the Spirit says to the churches" (Matt. 11-15; Apoc. 2:7).
      And what does He say?
      "Come, My children, listen to Me;
      I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps. 33:12).
      "Run while you have the light of life,
      lest the darkness of death overtake you" (John 12:35).

      REFLECTION

      Check out the similarities of this section, at the beginning of the
      Holy Rule, and the readings of early Lent, which stress that "now is
      the acceptable time." It brings to mind St. Benedict's later chapter
      which says that the monastic life ought always to have some semblance
      of Lent.

      That perpetual Lent chapter is the source of a lot of grumbling about
      austerity from one camp and cheering about it from another. Both may
      have missed a salient point. Perhaps the greatest element of
      perpetual Lent has less to do with austerity- even the monastic fast
      did not last all year. What are perpetually in style are repentance,
      wakefulness
      and self-examination.

      Monastic life withers in either smugness or a rut. What St. Benedict
      wants us to do is always to try and stay at that serious moment of
      taking inventory that many of us feel at Lent's beginning. We need to
      always be checking what needs to be cleaned up and we need to be
      prepared, even a bit eager, to start working on it. This is why a
      daily examination of conscience is so necessary. Compline, the
      traditional liturgical place for such examens, is a very apt place
      for same. As we prepare for sleep, which prefigures death, we prepare
      also for death, by examining our faults and asking forgiveness.

      The Holy Rule, like Lent, is by no means the gateway to an easier
      life, but to a holier one. As we actually grow in holiness much of it
      will become easier, more natural to us. But until that time, it is a
      struggle and, in unconquered areas, it remains something of a
      struggle for all of our lives. What's hard about that struggle isn't
      fasting or penance, but changing ourselves. Austere practices are
      just a means to that end, not ends in themselves.

      The whole idea of Lent and the Holy Rule is lasting change for the
      better. Lent is a seasonal construct to get us to begin anew, the
      Holy Rule says that beginning anew must be a daily thing. Lent is an
      attempt to get us to do for forty days what we ought to have been
      doing all year. The Holy Rule is a way to do what we ought to do all
      year, every day.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA









      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      I have no idea why this didn t go through yesterday. Catching up. BJL +PAX Prayers for the grace-filled success of our Oblate Day and our Sisters Monastic
      Message 209 of 209 , Mar 14
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        I have no idea why this didn't go through yesterday. Catching up. BJL
         
        +PAX
        Prayers for the grace-filled success of our Oblate Day and our Sisters' Monastic Experience weekend at Petersham and for all participating.
         
        Urgent prayers needed for Brian's brother-in-law, Paul. He is a diabetic, and now has been diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer. It is stage 3, and a biopsy this coming Tuesday will check to see if he is stage 4. He will be starting chemo & radiation. His wife is devastated. Brian has known Paul since they were very young, loves him like a brother and is crushed. Please pray for Paul, his wife, Brian and all their family and friends.
        Deo gratias, the twin's fluid build up is gone.

        Prayer for Brian T.,( another Brian,) who is being viciously harrassed.

        Prayers for JS, discernment and assistance in making an important life decision.

        Prayers for Beverly, special intention plus dicernment regarding another of perplexing issues..

        Deo gratias for all prayers and graces of the past.
        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 14, July 14, November 13
        Chapter 35: On the Weekly Servers in the Kitchen

        An hour before the meal let the weekly servers each receive a drink
        and some bread over and above the appointed allowance, in order
        that at the meal time they may serve their brethren without
        murmuring and without excessive fatigue. On solemn days, however,
        let them wait until after Mass.

        Immediately after the Morning Office on Sunday, the incoming and
        outgoing servers shall prostrate themselves before all the brethren
        in the oratory and ask their prayers. Let the server who is ending
        his week say this verse: "Blessed are You, O Lord God, who have
        helped me and consoled me." When this has been said three times and
        the outgoing server has received his blessing, then let the
        incoming server follow and say, "Incline unto my aid, O God; O
        Lord, make haste to help me." Let this also be repeated three times
        by all, and having received his blessing let him enter his service.

        REFLECTION

        Families, and parents and caregivers, listen up! There's an
        important lesson here. No task is too small to be blessed by
        prayer. More than that, no task is so easy that it can be done
        without God's help, so remember to thank Him. Of ourselves, we can
        do nothing, literally nothing. All our strength and power comes from God.

        Making dinner or washing the dishes? Take a quiet moment in the
        midst of either to say "Help!" and "Thanks!" Two simple, one word
        prayers. No matter how chaotic your household, everyone will find
        time for at least that. God knows the details, knows your heart and
        can readily fill in the blanks! We may think God needs essay-length
        prayers, but He doesn't. He may enjoy hearing from us, but trust
        me, we NEVER tell Him anything that's news to Him.

        This chapter is not simply the humility and charity of service, it
        is also the honest acknowledgment of complete helplessness without
        God. For most folks, only sickness or debility will teach them
        that. It may seem like nothing to bend down and pick up a pin off
        the floor until a bad back makes that impossible. Handicaps hone
        our perceptions of being in charge very, very well.

        Of course, there is another side to simple things like serving
        table, picking up pins and the like. One could not have done
        anything without God's help, but ah, if one does them out of love
        and care! Bingo! Double coupons, so to speak! If that pin got
        carefully picked up because of a barefoot and running child, or a
        beloved pet who is prone to "tasting" whatever she can find on the
        floor, simplicity becomes a very much greater matter, indeed. Now
        it is very close to the heart of God, and that is a wonderful place
        to be.

        By the way, though some might think me daft for saying this, it is
        not at all that crazy. There is no reason why families could not
        bless whomever is assigned to a domestic task for a week or month
        or whatever. A simple prayer asking God to help them serve us all
        and get over any rough times could be tastefully done without a lot
        of fuss. This could really help drive home the message of the worthwhile
        merit to be had in doing small things with love!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA
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