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Holy Rule for Mar 2

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of all the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Fr David, who
    Message 1 of 53 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of all the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Fr David, who was due to go work in a leper colony in Zimbabwe in July has just been diagnosed with bowel cancer. He has been raising funds for this for the last 18 months, and is due in hospital for the operation in the very near future. Prayers for healing would be good, acceptance, God's grace please.

      Barbara, suffering from depression.

      A. probably going to have to stop work in the not too distant future because her depression is so bad,

      Jack, 4 years old, end stage renal failure, waiting for a kidney transplant and now developing allergies to the dogs in the house (one of his comforts.) He's a fighter, as are his parents, but prayers are asked.

      Lois, for whom we've prayed previously. Cyber knife removed a few tumors, now she is prepping for more tests.

      Mary Linda, 56, brain cancer, moving on to experimental treatment.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
      mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      March 2, July 2, November 1
      Chapter 25: On Weightier Faults

      Let the brother who is guilty of a weightier fault be excluded both
      from the table and from the oratory. Let none of the brethren join
      him either for company or for conversation.
      Let him be alone at the work assigned him, abiding in penitential
      sorrow and pondering that terrible sentence of the Apostle where he
      says that a man of that kind is handed over
      for the destruction of the flesh, that the spirit may be saved in
      the day of the Lord (1 Cor. 5:5). Let him take his meals alone in
      the measure and at the hour which the Abbot shall consider suitable
      for him. He shall not be blessed by those who pass by, nor shall
      the food that is given him be blessed.

      REFLECTION

      Justice demands that the punishment fit the crime, and St. Benedict
      gives the two points between which a spectrum of other methods may
      be employed. He does not want a one-size-fits-all system of
      correction and clearly says so more than once.

      Think of any parent or authority figure you have ever heard
      criticized. If punishment was in any way involved, it is most
      likely that the fault was in doing too much or too little. A cruel
      person can make employees or children or monastics live in terror.
      Punishment is relentless and swift and often comes without warning.

      This may result in slavish compliance or outright rebellion, but it
      never results in a healthy self, for authority or subject. We are
      not called to live in dread of unwittingly angering some
      intransigent despot, whose whims may be dangerous, indeed. We are
      called to live
      in peace and mercy: to receive it and to give it to others. That is
      true of all monastics, superiors and those governed.

      But we are not called to peace at any price whatsoever, which is
      the fault of those who do too little to correct. Fear of the
      governed is as stupid and pointless as fear of the governor and
      neither helps anyone. While too much control may lead the community
      to fear the
      Abbess, too little will leave them equally afraid of each other!

      Note carefully that the missing ingredients in either extreme are
      love, real charity, as well as a trusting prayer for grace and
      guidance. If we are not showing
      His love to all, something is very wrong. If mercy does not temper
      justice (and justice does not temper total inaction!) something is
      quite amiss.

      Really peaceful people do not avoid confrontation at all costs, if
      they do, even they will never have peace. They will have nothing
      more than an uneasy truce or more less perpetual fear. That is not
      the loving way to deal with a problem.

      The Benedictine way is, as usual, the middle way. Some would put
      down the middle way, call it weak, but, as we have seen, it takes a
      tremendous amount of guts and grace to do it well. Our way is quite
      the reverse of a cop-out: it requires genuine courage and grace, to
      say nothing of its chief component, a lot of very frank and
      truthful LOVE! Ah, yes, and that mercy which is a mirror of the
      Divine Mercy, too!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA

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    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Prayers, please for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Dave, recurrent
      Message 53 of 53 , Mar 13, 2009
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

        Dave, recurrent prostate cancer, seeing oncologist on the 18th, and for Elaine, his wife.

        Tom, upper erosive esophagitus, a stomach ulcer and hiatal hernia. The current meds are
        not helping the problem. Seeing doctor today.

        Joyce, who had surgery and several organs are filled with cancer.
        The family needs prayers as it is very hard for them to deal with the diagnosis.

        Carol, undergoing surgery to repair leg tendons on Thursday... for a safe operation, and a quick, comfortable, and complete recovery.

        Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Doris, who has gone to God, for all her family and all who mourn her.

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
        mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 13, July 13, November 12
        Chapter 35: On the Weekly Servers in the Kitchen

        Let the brethren serve one another, and let no one be excused from
        the kitchen service
        except by reason of sickness or occupation in some important work.
        For this service brings increase of reward and of charity. But let
        helpers be provided for the weak ones, that they may not be
        distressed by this work; and indeed let everyone have help, as
        required by the size of the community or the circumstances of the
        locality. If the community is a large one,
        the cellarer shall be excused from the kitchen service; and so also
        those whose occupations are of greater utility, as we said above.
        Let the rest serve one another in charity.

        The one who is ending his week of service shall do the cleaning on
        Saturday. He shall wash the towels with which the brethren wipe
        their hands and feet; and this server who is ending his week, aided
        by the one who is about to begin, shall wash the feet of all the
        brethren. He shall return the utensils of his office to the
        cellarer clean and in good condition,
        and the cellarer in turn shall consign them to the incoming server,
        in order that he may know what he gives out and what he receives
        back.

        REFLECTION

        I know some houses have moved away from having table waiters, but
        something is lost in that. We have cafeteria style first portions
        here, then the waiter goes around to offer seconds and clears the
        dishes. It isn't a really big deal, but it does have a great reward,
        as the Holy Rule points out. Because we are a small community, only
        8, everyone, even the Superior takes a turn at waiting.

        Formerly, in some houses (maybe in all, but I am not sure,) the
        Abbot would wait tables on Holy Thursday. There was a nice
        connection there: he who held the place of Christ waited on all on
        the feast of the Last Supper, and washed the feet of twelve in
        Church that day.

        The connection here is personalist. Waiting on people connects you
        very much to them, as any waiter could tell you. Restaurants may
        not pursue that connection to any depth, but a home situation, like
        a monastery, surely does. There's a great notion here for Oblates
        who
        do not live alone: take turns waiting. We can get slumped into Dad
        or Mom or husband or wife always being waiter or waited upon.
        Switch off, care for each other, in this and many, many other ways!

        There are tons of ways of serving another, serving each other, that
        have nothing at all to do with tables or dining. There are many,
        many, equivalent forms of foot-washing. Hunt for them diligently and
        practice them with deep love!

        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org

        Petersham, MA





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