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Holy Rule for Mar. 1

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX Prayers, please, for my Dad, Jerome, on the anniversary of his death (it was actually Leap Year day, so most years that figures out to the 1st of Mar.)
    Message 1 of 54 , Feb 28, 2009
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for my Dad, Jerome, on the anniversary of his death (it was actually Leap Year day, so most years that figures out to the 1st of Mar.) For his happy death and eternal rest.

      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical welfare of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      Buck, laid off and looking for work, interview on Tuesday.

      Ryan, 17, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, tumors in leg and groin area and lung, and especially for his family.

      Mary, pain in left side of her neck and headache.

      A 16 year old girl with a tumor at the base of her brain operation will be Monday.

      Erica, 28, diagnosed with leukemia about four years ago. She has recently stopped responding to treatments and is fading very quickly. Please pray for either a miracle (God-willing) or a speedy, peaceful death. Please also pray for her family as they can do nothing for her.

      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
      mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      March 1, July 1, October 31
      Chapter 24: What the Measure of Excommunication Should Be

      The measure of excommunication or of chastisement should correspond
      to the degree of fault, which degree is estimated by the judgment
      of the Abbess.

      If a sister is found guilty of lighter faults, let her be excluded
      from the common table. Now the program for one deprived of the
      company of the table shall be as follows: In the oratory she shall
      intone neither Psalm nor antiphon nor shall she recite a lesson
      until she has made satisfaction; in the refectory she shall take
      her food alone after the community meal,
      so that if they eat at the sixth hour, for instance, that sister
      shall eat at the ninth,
      while if they eat at the ninth hour she shall eat in the evening,
      until by a suitable satisfaction she obtains pardon.

      REFLECTION

      Let's face it, St. Benedict has a lot to say about excommunication-
      a clumsy term, perhaps, because people often assume it means
      excommunication from the Church, which is the only sense of the
      word we commonly have today. It does not, of course mean that, just
      a punishment of exclusion from certain community functions.

      Let's face something else, at least in this chapter. Fasting an
      extra three hours might not be lovely, but no intoning in choir?
      What bad news! Gosh... Even many of us who CAN sing would look at
      that as a nice break!

      And eating alone? Well, the extra fast was a drag, but I sure
      missed that reader and the tedious book we've been reading.
      What awful luck!

      See the difference in perception a millennium or so can make? That
      may be a large part of why the penal code is not followed today:
      some of its punishments simply make little sense to modern
      monastics, some seem mean, and others (as above,) seem like
      downright vacations.

      The rest of this applies with great ease to family situations,
      marital situations and the workplace. Something must be gleaned
      from all this legislation for punishment: the one at fault must be
      told when something is wrong. That, after all, is the only reason
      for punishment, to be a wake up call to the less than brilliant.

      Unfortunately, the monastic hatred of personal confrontation
      endemic in our ranks assumes (because it is easiest to do so,)
      sufficient brilliance for all to sooner or later figure out that
      they are amiss. It just ain't so, folks, sorry! Things fester when
      they go ignored for years. Things that someone should have dealt
      with gently, but firmly and even summarily, in formation or
      childhood, torture the family in later years.

      Look, it is hard, VERY hard, to confront a predictably stubborn or
      difficult child or monastic or spouse or employee on a bad day.
      It's easy to see why one would rather not do so. But the Holy Rule
      asks many things that are difficult of us, and this one is
      unquestionably
      for the good of all, both the offender and the offended. The false
      charity, (really just cowardice in polite drag,) that omits to make
      these difficult corrections goes a long way to making everyone's
      life awful in the future.

      Also, in workplace especially, bear in mind that the authority
      figure here is the abbot, not the rank and file. One dare not
      assume all those prerogatives as a peer and equal. Fraternal
      correction will get a chapter of its own later on, but it is not a
      mantle to be assumed lightly. We must beware of the other extreme:
      becoming universal policing agents for all and sundry. A tiny spark
      of Gestapo flickers in many, if not most human hearts. Do nothing
      to fan the flame!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
      _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Prayers for our Sister Mary Paula, on her feastday, graces galore and many more! Ad multos annos! Prayers for Mary, on her birthday, graces galore and
      Message 54 of 54 , Jan 24

        +PAX

         

        Prayers for our Sister Mary Paula, on her feastday, graces galore and many more! Ad multos annos!

         

        Prayers for Mary, on her birthday, graces galore and many more! Ad multos annos!

         

        Deo gratias, Moira, for whom we prayed, safely delivered Victor, 11 lbs, and 2 oz., 22 inches long! Prayers, too, for all the family, Dad and brother, Angel and Angel 3rd, and for Gerry and Eva and Victor’s other set of grandparents.

         

        Prayers for three couples that need to get their marriages blessed and receive the Sacraments.

         

        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best, all is mercy and
        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much!

        January 25, May 26, September 25
        Chapter 7: On Humility

        Holy Scripture, brethren, cries out to us, saying,
        "Everyone who exalts himself shall be humbled,
        and he who humbles himself shall be exalted" (Luke 14:11).
        In saying this it shows us
        that all exaltation is a kind of pride,
        against which the Prophet proves himself to be on guard
        when he says,
        "Lord, my heart is not exalted,
        nor are mine eyes lifted up;
        neither have I walked in great matters,
        nor in wonders above me."
        But how has he acted?
        "Rather have I been of humble mind
        than exalting myself;
        as a weaned child on its mother's breast,
        so You solace my soul" (Ps. 130:1-2).


        Hence, brethren,
        if we wish to reach the very highest point of humility
        and to arrive speedily at that heavenly exaltation
        to which ascent is made through the humility of this present life,
        we must
        by our ascending actions
        erect the ladder Jacob saw in his dream,
        on which Angels appeared to him descending and ascending.
        By that descent and ascent
        we must surely understand nothing else than this,
        that we descend by self-exaltation and ascend by humility.
        And the ladder thus set up is our life in the would,
        which the Lord raises up to heaven if our heart is humbled.
        For we call our body and soul the sides of the ladder,
        and into these sides our divine vocation has inserted
        the different steps of humility and discipline we must climb.

        REFLECTION

        Today we begin St. Benedict's extensive treatment of humility.
        Humility and obedience are so closely linked that it is virtually
        impossible to speak of one without adding the other. Since both are
        essential Benedictine virtues, it is easy to say that there is no
        such thing as a holy Benedictine who has not climbed or is not
        climbing this ladder. I have never known a holy monk who was not
        humble, in fact, along with charity, it was usually their most outstanding trait.

        A lot of this chapter will grate on modern ears. I will be the first
        to admit that some people need assertiveness training. However, in my
        experience, most of us do not. Most of us manage to be assertive on a
        daily- even hourly- basis without much difficulty. Remember, too,
        that modern psychology is a science which, like all science, is
        limited to observable data.

        Hence, it is not surprising that the generalities of psychology deal
        with relations between people and things. The catch here is that the
        humility St. Benedict speaks of is rooted in relationship of humans
        to God, a sphere in which psychology finds itself woefully out
        of its element. It lacks the supernatural basis of faith; this impedes it in this
        area. Balance, always balance. Keep God in focus in these areas.
        The model is His greatness, not our own.

        A quickie on the Psalm quote today: "...neither have I walked in
        great matters, nor in matters above me." This was a favorite of
        Brother Patrick Creamer, my mentor. He learned to do it quite
        well and in just 46 years or so!! He'd laugh at my saying that.

        I speak as one who has been all too focused at many times on the
        monastic soap opera and its hand-wringing tempests in teacups. About
        many things, even most, we must learn simply not to get upset, not to
        trouble ourselves with matters too great, even though we may have to
        call them "great" with an inner, rueful chuckle.

        That's not apathy, simply a frank admission that, in many cases, others
        have charge of areas so that the rest need NOT worry or concern themselves.
        The purpose of the division of responsibility is to give the community the
        chance to focus their energy on the one thing really needful. This is especially
        true in monasteries, but the principle has applications in the workplace, too.
        In the latter, there may be times when one is morally obliged to get involved,
        but the key word is "morally". About trivia or non-essentials in any milieu,
        shrug, say nothing and keep your sanity.

        You will never have peace until you learn to leave all that alone, to
        distrust it for the empty and tragic charade that it truly is. And you will
        never get anywhere if you don't have peace. The road to that peace is
        humility and love.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

         

         

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