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Brother Jerome's Reflections: O Anthipons -- 17th

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  • Michael LoPiccolo
    +PAX A re-run, but hope it brightens your late Advent prayers! December 17 O Wisdom, You came forth from the mouth of the Most High, and reaching from
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 16, 2008
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      +PAX

      A re-run, but hope it brightens your late Advent prayers!

      December 17
      "O Wisdom, You came forth from the mouth of the Most High, and
      reaching from beginning to end, You ordered all things mightily and
      sweetly. Come and teach us the way of prudence."

      Much of what I write to you about the O Antiphons comes from what
      Abbot Lawrence of St. Augustine's Abbey, Ramsgate, Kent, told us in
      his conferences. I've added a thing or two to this one, as well.
      These Great Antiphons, which are sung at the Magnificat of Vespers
      during the last days before Christmas, are among the oldest and most
      poetic parts of the Western Liturgy. Their language soars and waxes
      in elegance that one rarely finds in later forms. Yet, in all that
      exquisite poetry, awesome theology, more to the point, Christology
      abounds.

      The Old Testament treats of Wisdom as the eldest daughter of
      creation, but also as a co-creator with God. Many of the OT
      references are commonly (and easily,) applied to the Holy Spirit, but
      this antiphon clearly applies them to Jesus.

      A recurring theme in the O Antiphons is the ascription of qualities
      of Yahweh to Christ, underlining the fact that all of God's divinity
      is Christ's as well. The phrase here "from beginning to end" stresses
      the eternal divinity of Christ, before all time, and the fact that
      He "ordered all things mightily and sweetly" recalls the role of the
      Logos, the Word, as creator of all things in the Prologue to St.
      John's Gospel.His might is gentle, not harsh, He is forceful and
      holds a creator's power, but sweetly, bearing these two traits, not
      in contrast, but in perfect, divine complement. Think of the greatest
      and most effective security protection imaginable, now think of that
      with none of the harsh sides of such power, but with the utmost
      tenderness of the gentlest of mothers. Multiply that image by
      infinity and you might have a faint fraction of the tenderness of God
      which enfolds His utter and absolute power. We have learned (often
      quite rightly!) to fear power, yet in God the power is to nurture, to
      love, to caress, not to harm. He cares deeply for
      all He orders "mightily and sweetly" and that especially includes us!
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