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Holy Rule for Apr. 18

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  • jeromeleo@stmarysmonastery.org
    +PAX I won t have time to respond to all the prayer requests individually, as I usually do. Please accept the intentions appearance here as acknowledgment.
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 17, 2008
      +PAX

      I won't have time to respond to all the prayer requests individually, as I usually do. Please accept the intentions' appearance here as acknowledgment.

      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

      B.'s son, overyworrying and causing needless stress, but, Deo gratias, recently confirmed and developing a relationship with God.

      Bea, severe rheumatoid arthritis pain and fearing addiction to pain meds.

      Annette, 30's, chemo for breast cancer.

      Jenn, early 20's, severe rheumatoid arthritis pain

      Mr. D., massive heart attack and bypass surgery.

      a troubled student and the teacher struggling to help him.

      Rachel, severe cold, possible pneumonia, may need hospitalization and has no insurance.

      Deo gratias, Paula and Bev, whose tests we prayed for had all results come bak negative. God is good!

      Lord, help us all
      as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is
      never absent, praise Him! JL

      April 18, August 18, December 18
      Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community

      Let all keep their places in the monastery
      established by the time of their entrance,
      the merit of their lives and the decision of the Abbot.
      Yet the Abbot must not disturb the flock committed to him,
      nor by an arbitrary use of his power ordain anything unjustly;
      but let him always think
      of the account he will have to render to God
      for all his decisions and his deeds.

      Therefore in that order which he has established
      or which they already had,
      let the brethren approach to receive the kiss of peace and Communion,
      intone the Psalms and stand in choir.
      And in no place whatever should age decide the order
      or be prejudicial to it;
      for Samuel and Daniel as mere boys judged priests.

      Except for those already mentioned, therefore,
      whom the Abbot has promoted by a special decision
      or demoted for definite reasons,
      all the rest shall take their order
      according to the time of their entrance.
      Thus, for example,
      he who came to the monastery at the second hour of the day,
      whatever be his age or his dignity,
      must know that he is junior
      to one who came at the first hour of the day.
      Boys, however, are to be kept under discipline
      in all matters and by everyone.

      REFLECTION

      I have known one monk of St. Leo who perhaps may have been delighted
      to be the most senior monk by age and entrance, but he is long gone
      now. The others I have known, who either held the first place or
      hovered near it, could not have cared less, might even chuckle about
      it if reminded. I like their way better.

      Rank is a handy way to organize people in line, but after that, its
      usefulness quickly diminishes. Rank that one desires or seeks can be
      downright pernicious and fatal to a monastic life. If you look at
      this chapter closely, it is not hard to see that St. Benedict wanted
      his monastics to pretty much take their place and forget about it-
      going any higher or lower had nothing to do with their own decision
      anyhow and they should be at peace.

      There's the rub: to be at peace! We need peace, we need inner
      serenity. It is no accident that it became our motto, PAX. That peace
      of soul is a fertile earth in which God tills His bountiful fields of
      graces. It is the foundation we need to build houses firm.

      Ever notice the readily apparent peace in a famous politician who has
      decided not to run anymore? Whether you like the man or not, a great
      freedom and relief is soon noticeable. It was so in Jimmy Carter,
      who, when free to be just Jimmy Carter, went on to do wonderful
      things. This renunciation is different, far different from quitting.
      Mere quitting shows up in a very bad light. What I think we are
      seeing is the light of a heart that has learned what NOT to
      desire,even if only partially.

      By the way, there's no need for any of us reading this to think we
      need to dream up a standard of WHAT we desire and perhaps should not.
      The Holy Rule has already done that for us, 1,500 years ago: "Let them
      prefer nothing whatever to the love of Christ."



      Love and prayers,

      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Please pray for Fr. Timothy and his Mom, Ethel. She had a bad fall yesterday and is in the hospital now with crushed vertebrae. The doctors don t think
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 17, 2016
        +PAX



        Please pray for Fr. Timothy and his Mom, Ethel. She had a bad fall yesterday
        and is in the hospital now with crushed vertebrae. The doctors don't think
        they'll be able to operate.



        Continued prayers for Sr. Mary Paula, in rehab and making progress, but
        still a ways to go. Thanks to all for their prayers.



        Prayers for Sr. Emmanuel and her Dad and sister. Sister will be staying with
        her Dad for a while to help with the transition for him after the loss of
        his wife. Sister thanks all for their prayers for her Mom and family.
        Continued prayers, please, especially for Sister and her Dad and sister, as
        well as for the eternal rest of her Mom.



        Prayers for J. B. to live a holy life.



        Prayers for African seminarian Sammy, waiting to hear from his Bishop if he
        may continue his studies._



        Prayers for Louie Aloyz and Alex M., both discerning religious vocations.



        Deo gratias and prayers of thanks, Jane N., for whom we prayed a few weeks
        ago, has been released from rehab.



        Remember that Eastertide is ongoing through Pentecost. Keep praying for your
        list of all those with whom you exchanged Easter greetings or cards or
        gifts, your own "Easter list."



        Lord,
        help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
        grace.
        God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 19, August 19, December 19
        Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community
        The juniors, therefore, should honor their seniors,
        and the seniors love their juniors.

        In the very manner of address,
        let no one call another by the mere name;
        but let the seniors call their juniors Brothers,
        and the juniors call their seniors Fathers,
        by which is conveyed the reverence due to a father.
        But the Abbot,
        since he is believed to represent Christ,
        shall be called Lord and Abbot,
        not for any pretensions of his own
        but out of honor and love for Christ.
        Let the Abbot himself reflect on this,
        and show himself worthy of such an honor.

        And wherever the brethren meet one another
        the junior shall ask the senior for his blessing.
        When a senior passes by,
        a junior shall rise and give him a place to sit,
        nor shall the junior presume to sit with him
        unless his senior bid him,
        that it may be as was written,
        "In honor anticipating one another."

        Boys, both small and adolescent,
        shall keep strictly to their rank in oratory and at table.
        But outside of that, wherever they may be,
        let them be under supervision and discipline,
        until they come to the age of discretion.

        REFLECTION

        Abbot Fidelis, my late novicemaster, used to always say that
        Benedictines were "gentlemen monks." At that time, the phrase annoyed
        me a good bit, though I never said so. It seemed to have a ring of
        faint middle-class respectability about it, not a little bourgeois,
        as if we were monks who were "the right sort of people."

        It would still annoy me today if, one meant by that phrase nothing
        more than all those rather hollow social niceties. Not that there's
        anything wrong as such with social niceties, just that I have grown
        up in a country where courtesy, "civil" religion and the like often had
        precious little to do with faith itself. Such things, though
        indubitably polite, sometimes seemed to me to be the basically
        disconnected veneer of an often mediocre faith. They can be the
        exercise of a genuine charity and animated faith, but sometimes
        they are not.

        Living among monastics will teach one (hopefully!) by osmosis that
        many of the common courtesies which have become decidedly UNcommon in
        the world are the order of the day here. We get so immersed in that
        that often it is hard to even think of what they are, we just do
        them. The best example I can come up with right now is that there is
        FAR more restraint here against interrupting another's conversation
        here than in the world at large. We do it sometimes, I do it too
        much, but basically we do NOT "butt in."

        There are many other little things, rising when a superior enters,
        not sitting until the superior does in chapter, etc. These in
        themselves may seem empty at first, but when linked to the charity of
        Christ and His Divine Mercy, they become very real gestures of love.
        The fact that we don't think of them much after a while in no way
        diminishes the Treasure that motivates them, Christ Himself.

        So, yes, my dear Abbot Fidelis, we ARE gentlemen monks (and gentle
        monastics period!) No, we are not like some terribly well-off and
        properly stuffy social elite. But we ARE gentle and we are so because of
        Him Whom we seek and have come to love more and more as we better
        see His ineffable mercy.



        Say a prayer, please, for Abbot Fidelis' eternal rest.

        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA



        _,_._,___



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • russophile2002
        +PAX Prayers for Julia, elderly and has Alzheimer’s, she has had three hospitalizations recently. Prayers, too, that her lifelong friend, Alicia, will get to
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 17

          +PAX

           

          Prayers for Julia, elderly and has Alzheimer’s, she has had three hospitalizations recently. Prayers, too, that her lifelong friend, Alicia, will get to see her

          While she still has her memory. They live in distant states from each other.

           

          Prayers for James R. and his wife, on the 18th wedding anniversary, graces galore and many more, ad multos annos!

           

          Prayers for Judy F., that her oral chemo is effective and works on her breast cancer. Prayers, too, for her son, Jeff, and all their family.

           

          Prayers for several pro-life demonstrators injured when a car accidentally struck them when it swerved to avoid hitting another car. It was unintentional and the injuries were not life-threatening. Prayers, too, for the driver of the car.

           

          Prayers for the success of our Oblate Day at Petersham, coming up this Saturday. May there be many blessings and graces for all.

           

          Prayers for Tim and Lorraine, making a long road trip this week to visit their son, for safe travels both ways and for a joyous time together as family.

           

          Lord, help us all
          as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is
          never absent, praise Him! JL

          April 18, August 18, December 18
          Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community

          Let all keep their places in the monastery
          established by the time of their entrance,
          the merit of their lives and the decision of the Abbot.
          Yet the Abbot must not disturb the flock committed to him,
          nor by an arbitrary use of his power ordain anything unjustly;
          but let him always think
          of the account he will have to render to God
          for all his decisions and his deeds.

          Therefore in that order which he has established
          or which they already had,
          let the brethren approach to receive the kiss of peace and Communion,
          intone the Psalms and stand in choir.
          And in no place whatever should age decide the order
          or be prejudicial to it;
          for Samuel and Daniel as mere boys judged priests.

          Except for those already mentioned, therefore,
          whom the Abbot has promoted by a special decision
          or demoted for definite reasons,
          all the rest shall take their order
          according to the time of their entrance.
          Thus, for example,
          he who came to the monastery at the second hour of the day,
          whatever be his age or his dignity,
          must know that he is junior
          to one who came at the first hour of the day.
          Boys, however, are to be kept under discipline
          in all matters and by everyone.

          REFLECTION

          It's possible, I guess, for a monk to be delighted
          to be the most senior by age and entrance, but I hope that is rare.

          The ones I have known, who either held the first place or
          hovered near it, could not have cared less, might even chuckle about
          it if reminded. I like their way better.

          Rank is a handy way to organize people in line, but after that, its
          usefulness quickly diminishes. Rank that one desires or seeks can be
          downright pernicious and fatal to a monastic life. If you look at
          this chapter closely, it is not hard to see that St. Benedict wanted
          his monastics to pretty much take their place and forget about it-
          going any higher or lower had nothing to do with their own decision
          anyhow and they should be at peace.

          There's the rub: to be at peace! We need peace, we need inner
          serenity. It is no accident that it became our motto, PAX. That peace
          of soul is a fertile earth in which God tills His bountiful fields of
          graces. It is the foundation we need to build houses firm.

          By the way, there's no need for any of us reading this to think we
          need to dream up a standard of WHAT we desire and perhaps should not.
          The Holy Rule has already done that for us, 1,500 years ago: "Let them
          prefer nothing whatever to the love of Christ."

          Love and prayers,

          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

           

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