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Holy Rule for June 27

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  • Br. Jerome Leo
    +PAX There are a great many prayer intentions tonight, so I am lumping them together a bit differently, putting many folks under for the health and families
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 26, 2007
      +PAX

      There are a great many prayer intentions tonight, so I am lumping them together a bit differently, putting many folks under "for the health and families of" heading. God surely understands. Hope no one minds.

      Prayers, please, for Josh, hunting for his true vocation. Prayers for a troubled family, with one spouse tempted to leave, five children involved. Prayers for Bill, James, Philip and Liz P. Prayers for all seriously threatened by awful rains and flooding in England, severe risk of a huge dam giving way, already at least one dead. Deo gratias, Susan, the dying woman we prayed for, died quickly and peacefully. Prayers for her happy death and eternal rest and all her family.

      For the health and families of:

      Dot, mastectomy on Monday.

      Allison and her son, John, false alarm for cancer, but both are still shaken after his surgery.

      Madelyn, cancer, given 5 months to a year to live.

      Jeannette's son, right knee surgery, and her grandson, William, in ER with severe asthma.

      Bob, our liver transplant. If chemo for hepatitis doesn't work, he has only weeks to live, and for Petrina, his wife. They are not believers, so prayers for grace!

      Baby Ethan, 7 days from a stem cell transplant, still only a miraculous chance of survival, but he has beta the odds so far!

      Jed, mental illness, refusing help, now a threat to his wife and son, he has been asked to leave their home.

      Tom, epileptic, severe head wound during a seizure, bleeding in his brain, in ICU for observation.

      Lenny, complications on a late abdominal aneurysm repair, on life support.

      Matt and Jenn and their unborn baby girl, she has 2 cysts on her brain, which may resolve themselves without trouble.

      C. somewhat scary blood work results, but doc is confident all will be OK.

      Sextuplets born in Phoenix, so far healthy, but a long road ahead. Deo gratias, breathing on their own now. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      February 26, June 27, October 27
      Chapter 20: On Reverence in Prayer

      When we wish to suggest our wants to persons of high station,
      we do not presume to do so
      except with humility and reverence.
      How much the more, then,
      are complete humility and pure devotion necessary
      in supplication of the Lord who is God of the universe!
      And let us be assured
      that it is not in saying a great deal that we shall be heard (Matt
      6:7),
      but in purity of heart and in tears of compunction.
      Our prayer, therefore, ought to be short and pure,
      unless it happens to be prolonged
      by an inspiration of divine grace.
      In community, however, let prayer be very short,
      and when the Superior gives the signal let all rise together.

      REFLECTION

      There is a necessary tension in Benedictine prayer, both public and
      private, between the awesome majesty and otherness of God and His
      infinite closeness and approachability. God is among us. He is not
      the guy next door, but neither is He some untouchable, easily
      offended emperor or sultan. Both these truths must be addressed in
      order to maintain a correct balance.

      God doesn't need ceremony, He doesn't need anything. All the high
      church in the world might (or might not...) tickle His fancy, but it
      does not one whit for Him personally. The rub here is that WE need
      what we offer to God, and that has been all too often forgotten in
      the last 40 years or so. In a very real and subtle sense, we BECOME
      what we offer to God, often quite unnoticed by ourselves.

      The upshot of all this is clear: offer God the lowest possible common
      denominator and that is what those offering will become; offer Him
      empty and presumptuous high church and be not surprised when those
      offering such things become rather pathetically silly themselves. In
      fact, sad fact, either extreme will make people pathetically silly
      and spiritually impoverished besides.

      Balance, always balance! The Holy Rule says "our prayer should short
      and pure." Fine, but the last part of that phrase has often gotten
      lost in the struggles of reform. Just plain short doesn't get it. God
      doesn't care about short, except insofar as it cheats us, those He
      loves. The balance of short AND pure will feed a normal soul well.
      Hence, if you find liturgy in any given place leaves you at least
      hungry and maybe starving, it's a safe guess that something might be
      wrong. God is still served, but His people often are not. That should
      upset both God and us.

      Many of those who tinkered with the Office in some of our monasteries
      were neither mystics nor liturgists. One hopes that, even though
      foolish at some extremes, they were at least well-intentioned.
      However, having lived with some of them, that is a conviction of
      charity that is difficult for me to maintain.

      Many who "renewed" the Office in the 60's and 70's are long since seeking their
      fulfillment elsewhere, with partners of either gender. Much of their tinkering
      was done in the midst of their worst vocational crises, with predictable results.
      The problem is that at any monastery, such things have a dreadful way of outliving
      their progenitors. Monastics have a tendency to leave things in place, not
      always wisely, by any stretch.

      I can only speak of the guys I knew personally, but many of them had
      a seriously deficient sense of history AND liturgy, not that either
      were paramount concerns in their eyes. The very 60's name of the game
      was a tragically appropriate line (from Laugh-In, yet!!) of "What's
      Happening NOW!" Whoops...not precisely the way the Council put it.
      They eagerly dismantled and reassembled monastic liturgy as if it had
      all the excesses of 11th century Cluny in 1964.

      It didn't. It needed work, but it wasn't Cluny. In many cases, they reduced
      liturgy to less than the historical reaction to Cluny of Citeaux and the first
      Cistercians in 1098. Hey, if they didn't have Cluny in the first
      place, going to more starkly bare liturgy than Citeaux was a bit of
      an over-reaction... Especially if the people involved were not
      Cistercian mystics, and let us be frank, they were not.

      This mess, and it is just that in some cases, will not end in my
      lifetime. I long hoped that it would. I longed to live again in a
      church where it was otherwise. Ain't gonna happen, and that is hard
      to accept. Sigh... What an odd sense of humor God has in creating us
      when He does, at times that seem to us so out of sync, but somehow
      must not be.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@...
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA











      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Br. Jerome Leo
      +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Billy, 56, for whom we prayed, and for his family and all who mourn him. Fr. John Adeyi, kidnapped Priest, has been found
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 26, 2016
        +PAX



        Prayers for the eternal rest of Billy, 56, for whom we prayed, and for his
        family and all who mourn him.



        Fr. John Adeyi, kidnapped Priest, has been found dead. Prayers for his
        eternal rest and his family and parishioners. Prayers, too, for the
        repentance and conversion of his killers.



        Prayers for Tom G., our Oblate, having shoulder surgery on June 27, for
        successful surgery and a speedy recovery.



        Prayers for Marge, 70's, she is having surgery today for a recurring
        infection which won't heal. She's been in the hospital for 2 weeks.



        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will
        is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so
        much. JL

        February 26, June 27, October 27
        Chapter 20: On Reverence in Prayer

        When we wish to suggest our wants to persons of high station,
        we do not presume to do so
        except with humility and reverence.
        How much the more, then,
        are complete humility and pure devotion necessary
        in supplication of the Lord who is God of the universe!
        And let us be assured
        that it is not in saying a great deal that we shall be heard (Matt
        6:7),
        but in purity of heart and in tears of compunction.
        Our prayer, therefore, ought to be short and pure,
        unless it happens to be prolonged
        by an inspiration of divine grace.
        In community, however, let prayer be very short,
        and when the Superior gives the signal let all rise together.

        REFLECTION

        There is a necessary tension in Benedictine prayer, both public and
        private, between the awesome majesty and otherness of God and His
        infinite closeness and approachability. God is among us. He is not
        the guy next door, but neither is He some untouchable, easily
        offended emperor or sultan. Both these truths must be addressed in
        order to maintain a correct balance.

        God doesn't need ceremony, He doesn't need anything. All the high
        church in the world might (or might not...) tickle His fancy, but it
        does not one whit for Him personally. The rub here is that WE need
        what we offer to God, and that has been all too often forgotten in
        the last 40 years or so. In a very real and subtle sense, we BECOME
        what we offer to God, often quite unnoticed by ourselves.

        The upshot of all this is clear: offer God the lowest possible common
        denominator and that is what those offering will become; offer Him
        empty and presumptuous high church and be not surprised when those
        offering such things become rather pathetically silly themselves. In
        fact, sad fact, either extreme will make people pathetically silly
        and spiritually impoverished besides.

        Balance, always balance! The Holy Rule says "our prayer should short
        and pure." Fine, but the last part of that phrase has often gotten
        lost in the struggles of reform. Just plain short doesn't get it. God
        doesn't care about short, except insofar as it cheats us, those He
        loves. The balance of short AND pure will feed a normal soul well.
        Hence, if you find liturgy in any given place leaves you at least
        hungry and maybe starving, it's a safe guess that something might be
        wrong. God is still served, but His people often are not. That should
        upset both God and us.


        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        Petersham, MA
        www.stmarysmonastery.org















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers for Fr. Stefano Visitin, OSB, newly installed Rector of the Pontifical Atheneum of Sant Anselmo, the international Benedictine college in Rome.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 26

          +PAX

           

          Prayers for Fr. Stefano Visitin, OSB, newly installed Rector of the Pontifical Atheneum of Sant’ Anselmo, the international Benedictine college in Rome.

          Prayers for his ministry there and the college and students he will serve. He is a monk of Praglia Abbey.

           

          Prayers for Fr. Paul Niebauer, OSB, of St. John’s Abbey, Collegeville, Minnesota, on his birthday. Graces galore and many more, ad multos annos!

           

          Prayers for Derek, his wife Lisa, her daughters Alex and Sharon and Alex's two year old son, Wyatt.  Their house burned to the ground in the middle of the night.  All are safe, Deo Gratias.

           

          Prayers for Lillian, as she undergoes tests today for a heart murmur, and also for her husband, Ron.  They are Derek's parents and near eighty.

           

          Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will
          is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so
          much. JL

          February 26, June 27, October 27
          Chapter 20: On Reverence in Prayer

          When we wish to suggest our wants to persons of high station,
          we do not presume to do so
          except with humility and reverence.
          How much the more, then,
          are complete humility and pure devotion necessary
          in supplication of the Lord who is God of the universe!
          And let us be assured
          that it is not in saying a great deal that we shall be heard (Matt
          6:7),
          but in purity of heart and in tears of compunction.
          Our prayer, therefore, ought to be short and pure,
          unless it happens to be prolonged
          by an inspiration of divine grace.
          In community, however, let prayer be very short,
          and when the Superior gives the signal let all rise together.

          REFLECTION

          There is a necessary tension in Benedictine prayer, both public and
          private, between the awesome majesty and otherness of God and His
          infinite closeness and approachability. God is among us. He is not
          the guy next door, but neither is He some untouchable, easily
          offended emperor or sultan. Both these truths must be addressed in
          order to maintain a correct balance.

          God doesn't need ceremony, He doesn't need anything. All the high
          church in the world might (or might not...) tickle His fancy, but it
          does not one whit for Him personally. The rub here is that WE need
          what we offer to God, and that has been all too often forgotten in
          the last 40 years or so. In a very real and subtle sense, we BECOME
          what we offer to God, often quite unnoticed by ourselves.

          The upshot of all this is clear: offer God the lowest possible common
          denominator and that is what those offering will become; offer Him
          empty and presumptuous high church and be not surprised when those
          offering such things become rather pathetically silly themselves. In
          fact, sad fact, either extreme will make people pathetically silly
          and spiritually impoverished besides.

          Balance, always balance! The Holy Rule says "our prayer should short
          and pure." Fine, but the last part of that phrase has often gotten
          lost in the struggles of reform. Just plain short doesn't get it. God
          doesn't care about short, except insofar as it cheats us, those He
          loves. The balance of short AND pure will feed a normal soul well.
          Hence, if you find liturgy in any given place leaves you at least
          hungry and maybe starving, it's a safe guess that something might be
          wrong. God is still served, but His people often are not. That should
          upset both God and us.


          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          Petersham, MA
          www.stmarysmonastery.org

           

           

           

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