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Holy Rule for Dec. 18

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  • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
    +PAX My dear friend, Sr. Lany Jo, asks the prayers of us all for her sister-in-law, killed in a car accident on the way to work, for her happy death and
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 17, 2006
      +PAX

      My dear friend, Sr. Lany Jo, asks the prayers of us all for her
      sister-in-law, killed in a car accident on the way to work, for her happy death and
      eternal rest. Prayers, too, Sister's brother and his children and prayers for Sr.
      Lany Jo herself, trying so hard to get out to Nevada to be with her brother
      at this time of terrible sadness.

      Prayers for Joseph, who has died after a long battle with Parkinsons's, for
      his happy death and eternal rest, and for his son, Joe, all his family and all
      who mourn him. Prayers for Tom, healing from serious accident, Jim healing &
      recovery, and for Marybeth, strength, perseverance, & continued caregiving
      to both Tom & Jim. Prayers of Deo gratias, H., for whom we prayed is making
      progress in his recovery from his mental illness. Lord, help us all as You know
      and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
      praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      April 18, August 18, December 18
      Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community

      Let all keep their places in the monastery
      established by the time of their entrance,
      the merit of their lives and the decision of the Abbot.
      Yet the Abbot must not disturb the flock committed to him,
      nor by an arbitrary use of his power ordain anything unjustly;
      but let him always think
      of the account he will have to render to God
      for all his decisions and his deeds.

      Therefore in that order which he has established
      or which they already had,
      let the brethren approach to receive the kiss of peace and Communion,
      intone the Psalms and stand in choir.
      And in no place whatever should age decide the order
      or be prejudicial to it;
      for Samuel and Daniel as mere boys judged priests.

      Except for those already mentioned, therefore,
      whom the Abbot has promoted by a special decision
      or demoted for definite reasons,
      all the rest shall take their order
      according to the time of their entrance.
      Thus, for example,
      he who came to the monastery at the second hour of the day,
      whatever be his age or his dignity,
      must know that he is junior
      to one who came at the first hour of the day.
      Boys, however, are to be kept under discipline
      in all matters and by everyone.

      REFLECTION

      St. Benedict, who has stressed fairness in so many ways, even
      equality, also insists on order, hence the title of this chapter. But
      it is an order which is largely established by God: the time of
      entrance. God calls when He chooses, whomever He chooses. When that
      person responds, that, for the most part, is going to determine their
      place in community.

      Families, too, need order. Yes, fairness and equality are important,
      but every child is not the equal of their siblings: anarchy would
      result. Imagine a teenager exactly equal to a toddler sibling, unable
      to interfere at all in the baby's whims to destroy its nursery or
      harm itself.

      We are used to hearing sibling rivalry horror stories that traipse
      far into adult life as psychological baggage. How many of them might
      have been avoided if, as St. Benedict prescribed for his family,
      order was never decided by capriciousness and affection was equal.

      Children cannot understand favoritism and rightly so. But a child
      could be a bit more comfortable with rewards for good behavior,
      "the merit of" their siblings lives. That might annoy them, true, but at
      least it is something they, too, can work towards. Arbitrary
      affectional preference is not.

      Note that St. Benedict leaves the Abbot free to advance anyone for
      his own reasons, but immediately tacks on a warning that the Abbot
      must not disturb his flock and that he must give an account of his
      stewardship. Abbots are human, not infallible. Human affection can
      enter into their choices and St. Benedict warns them against that.
      (PS: They have not always listened, but he did warn them...LOL!)

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
      _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
      Petersham, MA



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jeromeleo@stmarysmonastery.org
      +PAX Prayer intentions will be added tomorrow, as this machine does not support going back and forth between messages and my laptopis down the hill. God is
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 17, 2007
        +PAX

        Prayer intentions will be added tomorrow, as this machine does not support going back and forth between messages and my laptopis down the hill. God is outside of time and knows our prayers are coming. Please pray for all the intentions I could not post today. Thanks so much. JL

        April 18, August 18, December 18
        Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community

        Let all keep their places in the monastery
        established by the time of their entrance,
        the merit of their lives and the decision of the Abbot.
        Yet the Abbot must not disturb the flock committed to him,
        nor by an arbitrary use of his power ordain anything unjustly;
        but let him always think
        of the account he will have to render to God
        for all his decisions and his deeds.

        Therefore in that order which he has established
        or which they already had,
        let the brethren approach to receive the kiss of peace and Communion,
        intone the Psalms and stand in choir.
        And in no place whatever should age decide the order
        or be prejudicial to it;
        for Samuel and Daniel as mere boys judged priests.

        Except for those already mentioned, therefore,
        whom the Abbot has promoted by a special decision
        or demoted for definite reasons,
        all the rest shall take their order
        according to the time of their entrance.
        Thus, for example,
        he who came to the monastery at the second hour of the day,
        whatever be his age or his dignity,
        must know that he is junior
        to one who came at the first hour of the day.
        Boys, however, are to be kept under discipline
        in all matters and by everyone.

        REFLECTION

        St. Benedict, who has stressed fairness in so many ways, even
        equality, also insists on order, hence the title of this chapter. But
        it is an order which is largely established by God: the time of
        entrance. God calls when He chooses, whomever He chooses. When that
        person responds, that, for the most part, is going to determine their
        place in community.

        Families, too, need order. Yes, fairness and equality are important,
        but every child is not the equal of their siblings: anarchy would
        result. Imagine a teenager exactly equal to a toddler sibling, unable
        to interfere at all in the baby's whims to destroy its nursery or
        harm itself.

        We are used to hearing sibling rivalry horror stories that traipse
        far into adult life as psychological baggage. How many of them might
        have been avoided if, as St. Benedict prescribed for his family,
        order was never decided by capriciousness and affection was equal.

        Children cannot understand favoritism and rightly so. But a child
        could be a bit more comfortable with rewards for good behavior,
        "the merit of" their siblings lives. That might annoy them, true, but at
        least it is something they, too, can work towards. Arbitrary
        affectional preference is not.

        Note that St. Benedict leaves the Abbot free to advance anyone for
        his own reasons, but immediately tacks on a warning that the Abbot
        must not disturb his flock and that he must give an account of his
        stewardship. Abbots are human, not infallible. Human affection can
        enter into their choices and St. Benedict warns them against that.
        (PS: They have not always listened, but he did warn them...LOL!)

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
        _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
        Petersham, MA




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers for Dakota, a small boy life flighted to the hospital while having seizures of unknown origins and for his worried family. Prayers for all who
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 17, 2016

           

          +PAX

           

          Prayers for Dakota, a small boy life flighted to the hospital while having seizures of unknown origins and for his worried family.

           

          Prayers for all who must be out in the bitter cold in some parts of the northern US during this arctic storm, and for the safety of all affected.

           

          Prayers for Darrel, recovering from a total thyroidectomy, prayers for a speedy recovery and prayers that they got all the cancer. Prayers, too, for his wife, Cheryl, and all their family.

           

          Prayers for Pope Francis, on his 80th birthday, Dec. 17. Graces galore and many more! Ad multos annos!

           

          Prayers for the eternal rest of Lolita, whose death anniversary was yesterday, and for her husband, Robert, her children and for Sr. Lany Jo, her sister-in-law and for her family and all who mourn her.

           

          Lord, help us all as you know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 18, August 18, December 18
          Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community

          Let all keep their places in the monastery
          established by the time of their entrance,
          the merit of their lives and the decision of the Abbot.
          Yet the Abbot must not disturb the flock committed to him,
          nor by an arbitrary use of his power ordain anything unjustly;
          but let him always think
          of the account he will have to render to God
          for all his decisions and his deeds.

          Therefore in that order which he has established
          or which they already had,
          let the brethren approach to receive the kiss of peace and Communion,
          intone the Psalms and stand in choir.
          And in no place whatever should age decide the order
          or be prejudicial to it;
          for Samuel and Daniel as mere boys judged priests.

          Except for those already mentioned, therefore,
          whom the Abbot has promoted by a special decision
          or demoted for definite reasons,
          all the rest shall take their order
          according to the time of their entrance.
          Thus, for example,
          he who came to the monastery at the second hour of the day,
          whatever be his age or his dignity,
          must know that he is junior
          to one who came at the first hour of the day.
          Boys, however, are to be kept under discipline
          in all matters and by everyone.

          REFLECTION

          St. Benedict, who has stressed fairness in so many ways, even
          equality, also insists on order, hence the title of this chapter. But
          it is an order which is largely established by God: the time of
          entrance. God calls when He chooses, whomever He chooses. When that
          person responds, that, for the most part, is going to determine their
          place in community.

          Families, too, need order.
          We are used to hearing sibling rivalry horror stories that traipse
          far into adult life as psychological baggage. How many of them might
          have been avoided if, as St. Benedict prescribed for his family,
          order was never decided by capriciousness and affection was equal.

          Children cannot understand favoritism and rightly so. But a child
          could be a bit more comfortable with rewards for good behavior, or for
          the merit of their siblings' lives. That might annoy them, true, but at
          least it is something they, too, can work towards. Arbitrary
          affectional preference is not.

          Note that St. Benedict leaves the Abbot free to advance anyone for
          his own reasons, but immediately tacks on a warning that the Abbot
          must not disturb his flock and that he must give an account of his
          stewardship. Abbots are human, not infallible. Human affection can
          enter into their choices and St. Benedict warns them against that.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

           

           

           

           

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