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Holy Rule for Feb. 22

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Robert, Sr. Lany Jo s, Dad. His health is very rapidly declining, and for all his family, especially Sister Lany Jo and her brother.
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 22, 2006
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Robert, Sr. Lany Jo's, Dad. His health is very rapidly declining, and for all his family, especially Sister Lany Jo and her brother.

      Prayers for K., beginning remote preparations to follow her vocation with great joy and for all her family. Lots of adjustments to be made slowly by all. Prayers for Paul, and Mary, his wife. Prayers for Brian, 47, who died of a sudden heart attack, for his happy death and eternal rest, for his wife, Jenny and their daughters, Zoe and Grace, and all who mourn him. Prayer for Fr. Jim, lung cancer and doing poorly. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      February 22, June 23, October 23
      Chapter 18: In What Order the Psalms Are to Be Said

      At Terce, Sext and None on Monday
      let the nine remaining sections of Psalm 118 be said,
      three at each of these Hours.

      Psalm 118 having been completed, therefore,
      on two days, Sunday and Monday,
      let the nine Psalms from Psalm 119 to Psalm 127
      be said at Terce, Sext and None,
      three at each Hour,
      beginning with Tuesday.
      And let these same Psalms be repeated every day until Sunday
      at the same Hours,
      while the arrangement of hymns, lessons and verses
      is kept the same on all days;
      and thus Prime on Sunday will always begin with Psalm 118.


      REFLECTION

      It is easy to think that St. Benedict included all this repetition- 6
      days worth!- in the Psalms of the minor hours for its own sake, but
      that is not necessarily so. Remember that, in St. Benedict's time,
      the distinction of lay brothers or sisters, who did not say the full
      Office in choir, did not yet exist: everyone said the full Office,
      even while away or working at a distance.

      That provides a very likely possibility for the 6 days- all of them
      working days- of repetition. Try saying the same 9 short Psalms 6 days a
      week for a while and watch how fast they slip into memory. Monks
      could pray the minor hours in the fields or on the road to market
      with farm goods, anywhere.

      That might not be a bad idea for rushed Oblates today. What if one
      chose just one of these short minor hours with Gradual Psalms and
      memorized it, maybe Sext for the lunch hour, or None for the drive
      home, even Terce for the ride to work? I often say parts of the
      Office I have memorized on public transport or while driving: no
      book, no fuss, no worry.

      It is a great freedom to require nothing but one's memory and heart
      to say part of the Office. Not only that, but moments of solitude for prayer
      often surprise us during the day, come when and where we least expect
      them. A memorized hour lets us always be ready for them.

      LOTS of people have trouble with Psalm 118. That's not surprising
      because, even if unconsciously, we have come to expect at least more
      or less of a whole thought or story to a given Psalm. Most of them
      certainly offer this.

      Psalm 118, by contrast, seems to ramble on and on and all over the
      place. Yes, there's a common thread of sorts in dealing with the Law,
      but even that doesn't figure everywhere. It often reads as nothing
      more thrilling than a somewhat disjointed collection of proverbs. Try
      saying the whole Psalm at once and you'll see what I mean! (I know it
      is the longest, but saying the whole thing will take less than 15
      minutes or so.)

      OK, for one thing, Psalm 118 is an alphabetical psalm, hence those
      names of Hebrew letters at the beginning of each section. That's the
      hook in the Hebrew original that is lost in translation: every
      verse begins with the same letter. Small wonder that we may find it a
      nearly random grouping of unrelated sayings!

      So, yeah, a LOT of the verses will sound like someone was casting a
      large net for something to come up with next, largely because of the
      alphabetical restraint in composition. Try to get beyond all that,
      relax, and realize that Psalm 118 really *IS* a collection of
      proverbs with a very loose theme. Enjoy it as proverbs and stop
      worrying!

      The Psalms were dear to the early monastics because they were seen as
      a compendium of Scripture. In other words, all the basic elements of
      Scripture were to be found in them, including representatives of the
      most common literary forms: history, poetry, prophecy and
      wisdom/proverbs. Psalm 118 covers the latter category quite
      masterfully!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
      +PAX HUGE Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving: Francis, for whom we prayed, who has gone into hospice, has received the Sacraments for the first time in 60
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 21, 2007
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        +PAX

        HUGE Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving: Francis, for whom we prayed,
        who has gone into hospice, has received the Sacraments for the first time in 60
        years or so. Prayers that his conversion continues strong. Deep thanks from
        Dave, his son. Prayers, too, for Francis' wife, who has to go into a nursing
        home temporarily after her hospitalization and stroke. This has her terribly
        depressed and suffering from loss of appetite.

        Prayers of Deo gratias and thanksgiving for Linda and Jim, expecting their
        first grandchild, and for the proud parents-to-be. May God keep all of them
        safe and well.

        Prayers for Jim, in ICU, has been anointed and seems to be dying, for his
        happy death and eternal rest, for his Mom and all their family and all who will
        mourn him. Prayers for Carolyn's father-in-law, who had a heart procedure
        done last week; now his lung has collapsed. Lord, help us all as You know and
        will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise
        Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 22, June 23, October 23
        Chapter 18: In What Order the Psalms Are to Be Said

        At Terce, Sext and None on Monday
        let the nine remaining sections of Psalm 118 be said,
        three at each of these Hours.

        Psalm 118 having been completed, therefore,
        on two days, Sunday and Monday,
        let the nine Psalms from Psalm 119 to Psalm 127
        be said at Terce, Sext and None,
        three at each Hour,
        beginning with Tuesday.
        And let these same Psalms be repeated every day until Sunday
        at the same Hours,
        while the arrangement of hymns, lessons and verses
        is kept the same on all days;
        and thus Prime on Sunday will always begin with Psalm 118.


        REFLECTION

        It is easy to think that St. Benedict included all this repetition- 6
        days worth!- in the Psalms of the minor hours for its own sake, but
        that is not necessarily so. Remember that, in St. Benedict's time,
        the distinction of lay brothers or sisters, who did not say the full
        Office in choir, did not yet exist: everyone said the full Office,
        even while away or working at a distance.

        That provides a very likely possibility for the 6 days- all of them
        working days- of repetition. Try saying the same 9 short Psalms 6 days a
        week for a while and watch how fast they slip into memory. Monks
        could pray the minor hours in the fields or on the road to market
        with farm goods, anywhere.

        That might not be a bad idea for rushed Oblates today. What if one
        chose just one of these short minor hours with Gradual Psalms and
        memorized it, maybe Sext for the lunch hour, or None for the drive
        home, even Terce for the ride to work? I often say parts of the
        Office I have memorized on public transport or while driving: no
        book, no fuss, no worry.

        It is a great freedom to require nothing but one's memory and heart
        to say part of the Office. Not only that, but moments of solitude for prayer
        often surprise us during the day, come when and where we least expect
        them. A memorized hour lets us always be ready for them.

        LOTS of people have trouble with Psalm 118. That's not surprising
        because, even if unconsciously, we have come to expect at least more
        or less of a whole thought or story to a given Psalm. Most of them
        certainly offer this.

        Psalm 118, by contrast, seems to ramble on and on and all over the
        place. Yes, there's a common thread of sorts in dealing with the Law,
        but even that doesn't figure everywhere. It often reads as nothing
        more thrilling than a somewhat disjointed collection of proverbs. Try
        saying the whole Psalm at once and you'll see what I mean! (I know it
        is the longest, but saying the whole thing will take less than 15
        minutes or so.)

        OK, for one thing, Psalm 118 is an alphabetical psalm, hence those
        names of Hebrew letters at the beginning of each section. That's the
        hook in the Hebrew original that is lost in translation: every
        verse begins with the same letter. Small wonder that we may find it a
        nearly random grouping of unrelated sayings!

        So, yeah, a LOT of the verses will sound like someone was casting a
        large net for something to come up with next, largely because of the
        alphabetical restraint in composition. Try to get beyond all that,
        relax, and realize that Psalm 118 really *IS* a collection of
        proverbs with a very loose theme. Enjoy it as proverbs and stop
        worrying!

        The Psalms were dear to the early monastics because they were seen as
        a compendium of Scripture. In other words, all the basic elements of
        Scripture were to be found in them, including representatives of the
        most common literary forms: history, poetry, prophecy and
        wisdom/proverbs. Psalm 118 covers the latter category quite
        masterfully!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
        _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
        Petersham, MA




        <BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
        email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, for all their families and loved ones and all who mourn them: Angela, Joan, Larry
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 21, 2008
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          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of the following, for all their families and loved ones and all who mourn them:

          Angela, Joan, Larry and another Angela, all of whom died recently.


          Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their families and for all who take care of them:

          Lil, 83, staph infection affecting her heart, also kidney damage from osteporosis meds and in a lot of pain.

          for safe travel for Erin, going to Poland.

          Deo gratias for Denise, for whom we prayed, MRI showed discs fine, but joints inflamed, so some more prayers, please.

          a four month old baby who has a rare skin disease, because of the baby's age, the docs can only treat symptoms, not the cause, and the child is in a lot of discomfort, hard on the Mom, who has 3 other kids to looks after.

          Ron, lung surgery for tumor removal.

          Eric, a teen having extensive reconstructive surgery on his legs and hips to correct a birth defect.

          For Jessie, caught up in wicca and her boyfriend, Stephen, possibly also wiccan.

          Lord, help us all as You know and
          will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise
          Him! Thanks so much. JL

          February 22, June 23, October 23
          Chapter 18: In What Order the Psalms Are to Be Said

          At Terce, Sext and None on Monday
          let the nine remaining sections of Psalm 118 be said,
          three at each of these Hours.

          Psalm 118 having been completed, therefore,
          on two days, Sunday and Monday,
          let the nine Psalms from Psalm 119 to Psalm 127
          be said at Terce, Sext and None,
          three at each Hour,
          beginning with Tuesday.
          And let these same Psalms be repeated every day until Sunday
          at the same Hours,
          while the arrangement of hymns, lessons and verses
          is kept the same on all days;
          and thus Prime on Sunday will always begin with Psalm 118.


          REFLECTION

          It is easy to think that St. Benedict included all this repetition- 6
          days worth!- in the Psalms of the minor hours for its own sake, but
          that is not necessarily so. Remember that, in St. Benedict's time,
          the distinction of lay brothers or sisters, who did not say the full
          Office in choir, did not yet exist: everyone said the full Office,
          even while away or working at a distance.

          That provides a very likely possibility for the 6 days- all of them
          working days- of repetition. Try saying the same 9 short Psalms 6 days a
          week for a while and watch how fast they slip into memory. Monks
          could pray the minor hours in the fields or on the road to market
          with farm goods, anywhere.

          That might not be a bad idea for rushed Oblates today. What if one
          chose just one of these short minor hours with Gradual Psalms and
          memorized it, maybe Sext for the lunch hour, or None for the drive
          home, even Terce for the ride to work? I often say parts of the
          Office I have memorized on public transport or while driving: no
          book, no fuss, no worry.

          It is a great freedom to require nothing but one's memory and heart
          to say part of the Office. Not only that, but moments of solitude for prayer
          often surprise us during the day, come when and where we least expect
          them. A memorized hour lets us always be ready for them.

          LOTS of people have trouble with Psalm 118. That's not surprising
          because, even if unconsciously, we have come to expect at least more
          or less of a whole thought or story to a given Psalm. Most of them
          certainly offer this.

          Psalm 118, by contrast, seems to ramble on and on and all over the
          place. Yes, there's a common thread of sorts in dealing with the Law,
          but even that doesn't figure everywhere. It often reads as nothing
          more thrilling than a somewhat disjointed collection of proverbs. Try
          saying the whole Psalm at once and you'll see what I mean! (I know it
          is the longest, but saying the whole thing will take less than 15
          minutes or so.)

          OK, for one thing, Psalm 118 is an alphabetical psalm, hence those
          names of Hebrew letters at the beginning of each section. That's the
          hook in the Hebrew original that is lost in translation: every
          verse begins with the same letter. Small wonder that we may find it a
          nearly random grouping of unrelated sayings!

          So, yeah, a LOT of the verses will sound like someone was casting a
          large net for something to come up with next, largely because of the
          alphabetical restraint in composition. Try to get beyond all that,
          relax, and realize that Psalm 118 really *IS* a collection of
          proverbs with a very loose theme. Enjoy it as proverbs and stop
          worrying!

          The Psalms were dear to the early monastics because they were seen as
          a compendium of Scripture. In other words, all the basic elements of
          Scripture were to be found in them, including representatives of the
          most common literary forms: history, poetry, prophecy and
          wisdom/proverbs. Psalm 118 covers the latter category quite
          masterfully!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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