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Feb 21

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  • russophile2002 <jeromeleo@earthlink.net>
    +PAX Prayers, please, Carolyn, facing an interview that decides much about her scholastic future, and for Janet, her Mom, who asked us! Also, for the health of
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 21, 2003
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, Carolyn, facing an interview that decides much about
      her scholastic future, and for Janet, her Mom, who asked us! Also,
      for the health of Jodie and her sister, and for the health and
      strength of Norbert. God's will be done! Thanks, NRN JL


      February 21, June 22, October 22

      Chapter 18: In What Order the Psalms Are to Be Said


      Let this verse be said:
      "Incline unto my aid, O God;
      O Lord, make haste to help me,"
      and the "Glory be to the Father"
      then the hymn proper to each Hour.


      Then at Prime on Sunday
      four sections of Psalm 118 are to be said;
      and at each of the remaining Hours,
      that is Terce, Sext and None,
      three sections of the same Psalm 118.

      At Prime on Monday let three Psalms be said,
      namely Psalms 1, 2 and 6.
      And so each day at Prime until Sunday
      let three Psalms be said in numerical order, to Psalm 19,
      but with Psalms 9 and 17 each divided into two parts.
      Thus it comes about that the Night Office on Sunday
      always begins with Psalm 20.

      REFLECTION

      There were two principal ways of handling psalmody in the early
      developments of the Divine Office. One was the cathedral usage, which
      tended to insist on using psalms appropriate to the hour of the day,
      morning psalms for morning prayer and evening psalms for evening
      prayer. The other was the monastic usage, which had as its focus
      simply saying all 150 psalms over a given period and prayed them
      consecutively, 1,2,3, and so on.

      St. Benedict does a bit of both. As usual, he is the master of the
      moderate, middle way. Some of his psalmody IS appropriate to time,
      some of it is just consecutively running. It is interesting to note
      that St. Benedict, ever the balancer, actually shortened the Roman
      cathedral usage Matins of his time for his monks. The latter
      contained nearly twice as many psalms!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB

      jeromeleo@... St. Mary's Monastery Petersham, MA
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