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Holy Rule for Dec. 15

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers for our Brother Vincent, as he turns ****42**** today, codgering into his 43rd year! Ad multos annos and many graces and blessings. Prayers,
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 15, 2005
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      +PAX

      Prayers for our Brother Vincent, as he turns ****42**** today, codgering into his 43rd year! Ad multos annos and many graces and blessings.

      Prayers, please, for Ali, her husband, her brother and her Dad, all facing the stressful anniversary of her Mum's death on the 19th, a tough time at Christmas season for them. Also for two anonymous women, one facing terrible stress at work and another with a hysterectomy scheduled and now breast pain she fears is cancerous. Prayers for Bob, undergoing back surgery today in Orlando. Prayers for Jimmy and Alicia on their birthdays. Prayers for the vocational search of Cyril, Andy and Chris.

      Special prayers for Matt and his children and family as a very important court date for custody happens today. May ALL do God's will there in a very messy situation. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      April 15, August 15, December 15
      Chapter 61: How Pilgrim Monks Are To Be Received

      If a pilgrim monastic coming from a distant region
      wants to live as a guest of the monastery,
      let her be received for as long a time as she desires,
      provided she is content
      with the customs of the place as she finds them
      and does not disturb the monastery by superfluous demands,
      but is simply content with what she finds.
      If, however, she censures or points out anything reasonably
      and with the humility of charity,
      let the Abbess consider prudently
      whether perhaps it was for that very purpose
      that the Lord sent her.

      If afterwards she should want to bind herself to stability,
      her wish should not be denied her,
      especially since there has been opportunity
      during her stay as a guest
      to discover her character.

      REFLECTION

      One of the Desert Fathers (forgive me for not recalling which one,)
      said that there is nothing so careful as a monk not living in his
      native land. That's very true for most of us, though part two of this
      chapter makes it clear that it's not true for everyone. When we
      visit, we want people to think the best of the home, the family, the
      land from which we came. It is this nobility of striving, this
      mindful courtesy that the Desert Father wished to praise. In fact, if
      I read it correctly, the implication was that it might even be better
      to be a monastic AWAY from one's native land for just those reasons.

      There is something striking here. Remember how badly the gyrovagues
      and Sarabaites were painted in the types of monks? Well, these were
      the wandering ones, and St. Benedict knew very well that a pilgrim
      monk at the door could be one of these sorts. He doesn't even mention it.

      He wants them to have a chance to do better, to be healed by
      community. If they louse it up, fine, he's not going to lose a lot of
      sleep over it, but he does insist they be given a chance to improve.
      Given what the monastic world thought of gyrovagues and the like,
      that says a LOT for St. Benedict's tolerance and clemency.

      Not all of us are in cloisters, but all of us have doors. The people
      who come to those doors may be gyrovagues and Sarabaites, but they
      may not, too. We have to give them a chance to prove or reveal
      themselves. This is true of anyone we encounter. Snap judgments are
      not wise, they cheat us out of many gifts. Being too much or too
      little on the side of caution are both traps. Tread the middle way,
      always the middle way.

      This doesn't mean we have to dupe ourselves into perpetual
      vulnerability, but it does mean we have to be open, mindful and
      listening, really listening to all comers. Listen first, sift later.
      Do both, always both.

      We can get so used to our lives that we are blind to areas that could
      be improved. We can get so used to doing things one way that anything
      better is beyond us. Our routines which become sacrosanct are often
      not at all that holy!

      An outsider's objective view can let us see a good deal about
      ourselves. Some things we may want to change, some we may realize are
      fine as they are. Either way, the visitor can be a reality check of
      great worth.


      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
      +PAX Prayers for our Brother Vincent on his birthday, many of you are enjoying his efforts in our newsletter. He worked very hard on that. Graces and blessings
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 14, 2006
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        +PAX

        Prayers for our Brother Vincent on his birthday, many of you are enjoying
        his efforts in our newsletter. He worked very hard on that. Graces and blessings
        galore for him, please! Prayers for C., thinking about entering the Roman
        Catholic Church.

        Prayers of Deo gratias for Shirley, a work situation resolved wonderfully.
        Prayers for Jim, unchecked alcoholism, and for all who suffer from addictions.
        Prayers for Dottie, who has melanoma, it is recurring and now in her lungs,
        muscles in her back, lymph nodes, colon and perhaps her stomach is involved
        also. Prayers, too. for her sister and all her family. Prayers for all those
        who treat our prayer folks. God reward them. Lord, help us all as You know and
        will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
        praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 15, August 15, December 15
        Chapter 61: How Pilgrim Monks Are To Be Received

        If a pilgrim monastic coming from a distant region
        wants to live as a guest of the monastery,
        let her be received for as long a time as she desires,
        provided she is content
        with the customs of the place as she finds them
        and does not disturb the monastery by superfluous demands,
        but is simply content with what she finds.
        If, however, she censures or points out anything reasonably
        and with the humility of charity,
        let the Abbess consider prudently
        whether perhaps it was for that very purpose
        that the Lord sent her.

        If afterwards she should want to bind herself to stability,
        her wish should not be denied her,
        especially since there has been opportunity
        during her stay as a guest
        to discover her character.

        REFLECTION

        One of the Desert Fathers (forgive me for not recalling which one,)
        said that there is nothing so careful as a monk not living in his
        native land. That's very true for most of us, though part two of this
        chapter makes it clear that it's not true for everyone. When we
        visit, we want people to think the best of the home, the family, the
        land from which we came. It is this nobility of striving, this
        mindful courtesy that the Desert Father wished to praise. In fact, if
        I read it correctly, the implication was that it might even be better
        to be a monastic AWAY from one's native land for just those reasons.

        There is something striking here. Remember how badly the gyrovagues
        and Sarabaites were painted in the types of monks? Well, these were
        the wandering ones, and St. Benedict knew very well that a pilgrim
        monk at the door could be one of these sorts. He doesn't even mention it.

        He wants them to have a chance to do better, to be healed by
        community. If they louse it up, fine, he's not going to lose a lot of
        sleep over it, but he does insist they be given a chance to improve.
        Given what the monastic world thought of gyrovagues and the like,
        that says a LOT for St. Benedict's tolerance and clemency.

        Not all of us are in cloisters, but all of us have doors. The people
        who come to those doors may be gyrovagues and Sarabaites, but they
        may not, too. We have to give them a chance to prove or reveal
        themselves. This is true of anyone we encounter. Snap judgments are
        not wise, they cheat us out of many gifts. Being too much or too
        little on the side of caution are both traps. Tread the middle way,
        always the middle way.

        This doesn't mean we have to dupe ourselves into perpetual
        vulnerability, but it does mean we have to be open, mindful and
        listening, really listening to all comers. Listen first, sift later.
        Do both, always both.

        We can get so used to our lives that we are blind to areas that could
        be improved. We can get so used to doing things one way that anything
        better is beyond us. Our routines which become sacrosanct are often
        not at all that holy!

        An outsider's objective view can let us see a good deal about
        ourselves. Some things we may want to change, some we may realize are
        fine as they are. Either way, the visitor can be a reality check of
        great worth.


        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
        _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
        Petersham, MA



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers for our Br. Vincent, on his birthday! Ad multos annos! Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 14, 2007
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          +PAX

          Prayers for our Br. Vincent, on his birthday! Ad multos annos!

          Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their families and all who take care of them, also for the happy death of those listed below who have died:

          Please pray for a happy death and eternal rest for Rita's eldest child, Tim, who has lost the battle with spinal cancer. Rita is a single mom (deserted by her husband) with two remaining children both of whom have serious life threatening illnesses. Please pray for all the family.

          Guy, in hospital with pulmonary edema.

          Brie, painful ankle sprain.

          2 year old Destiny who died this week, and for her doctors who can't identify what caused her death and most of all her 24 year old parents who lost their only child during this Advent-Christmas season - in this time of waiting for the Christ Child, they have lost their child.

          Ivory, 7, severe neck thrroat and spinal injuries in a go cart accident, spinal cord definitely severed lower down, possibly in her neck, too.

          Kathleen and her cousins,one cousin is just 35, married with three young children. He was taken to the hospital yesterday with numbness in his left arm and chest pains. He is possibly having an angioplasty today.

          Then his younger sister was having vision problems and is having a MRI today with a possible brain tumor. She just had her first baby two months ago.

          Carole's family. Her sister Nancy died this week of cancer, leaving behind Nancy's daughter Jonny, who is disabled and had lived with her in an assisted living center. Nancy is Carole's only sibling, so she's feeling particularly lonely at this loss.

          Paula, severe depression.

          Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 15, August 15, December 15
          Chapter 61: How Pilgrim Monks Are To Be Received

          If a pilgrim monastic coming from a distant region
          wants to live as a guest of the monastery,
          let her be received for as long a time as she desires,
          provided she is content
          with the customs of the place as she finds them
          and does not disturb the monastery by superfluous demands,
          but is simply content with what she finds.
          If, however, she censures or points out anything reasonably
          and with the humility of charity,
          let the Abbess consider prudently
          whether perhaps it was for that very purpose
          that the Lord sent her.

          If afterwards she should want to bind herself to stability,
          her wish should not be denied her,
          especially since there has been opportunity
          during her stay as a guest
          to discover her character.

          REFLECTION

          One of the Desert Fathers (forgive me for not recalling which one,)
          said that there is nothing so careful as a monk not living in his
          native land. That's very true for most of us, though part two of this
          chapter makes it clear that it's not true for everyone. When we
          visit, we want people to think the best of the home, the family, the
          land from which we came. It is this nobility of striving, this
          mindful courtesy that the Desert Father wished to praise. In fact, if
          I read it correctly, the implication was that it might even be better
          to be a monastic AWAY from one's native land for just those reasons.

          There is something striking here. Remember how badly the gyrovagues
          and Sarabaites were painted in the types of monks? Well, these were
          the wandering ones, and St. Benedict knew very well that a pilgrim
          monk at the door could be one of these sorts. He doesn't even mention it.

          He wants them to have a chance to do better, to be healed by
          community. If they louse it up, fine, he's not going to lose a lot of
          sleep over it, but he does insist they be given a chance to improve.
          Given what the monastic world thought of gyrovagues and the like,
          that says a LOT for St. Benedict's tolerance and clemency.

          Not all of us are in cloisters, but all of us have doors. The people
          who come to those doors may be gyrovagues and Sarabaites, but they
          may not, too. We have to give them a chance to prove or reveal
          themselves. This is true of anyone we encounter. Snap judgments are
          not wise, they cheat us out of many gifts. Being too much or too
          little on the side of caution are both traps. Tread the middle way,
          always the middle way.

          This doesn't mean we have to dupe ourselves into perpetual
          vulnerability, but it does mean we have to be open, mindful and
          listening, really listening to all comers. Listen first, sift later.
          Do both, always both.

          We can get so used to our lives that we are blind to areas that could
          be improved. We can get so used to doing things one way that anything
          better is beyond us. Our routines which become sacrosanct are often
          not at all that holy!

          An outsider's objective view can let us see a good deal about
          ourselves. Some things we may want to change, some we may realize are
          fine as they are. Either way, the visitor can be a reality check of
          great worth.


          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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