Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Holy Rule for Dec. 13

Expand Messages
  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Madeline, 18 months, and for her distraught parents, Kevin and Susan, her great aunt, Maureen, who asked, and all their family. What
    Message 1 of 29 , Dec 13, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Madeline, 18 months, and for her distraught parents, Kevin and Susan, her great aunt, Maureen, who asked, and all their family. What was thought to be a persistent ear infection turns out to be a tumor on her brain at the base of her skull. Biopsy results pending. Prayers for Matt and his children as an important custody case court date nears this week, especially for Matt's trust in God, as he is perforce acting as his own attorney. Prayers for Sam and his wife and their daughter Amy, as they near the anniversary of a traumatic car accident in which Amy was injured and her fiance killed. We had prayed for them at that time, but the anniversary is especially tough on all concerned. Lastly, prayers for our guesthouse furnace, which is shutting off again, even after a thorough check this weekend and it is supposed to go to 0 degrees F or below tonight. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much! JL

      April 13, August 13, December 13
      Chapter 59: On the Sons of Nobles and of the Poor Who Are Offered

      If anyone of the nobility
      offers his son to God in the monastery
      and the boy is very young,
      let his parents draw up the document which we mentioned above;
      and at the oblation
      let them wrap the document itself and the boy's hand in the altar
      cloth. That is how they offer him.

      As regards their property,
      they shall promise in the same petition under oath
      that they will never of themselves, or through an intermediary,
      or in any way whatever,
      give him anything
      or provide him with the opportunity of owning anything.
      Or else,
      if they are unwilling to do this,
      and if they want to offer something as an alms to the monastery
      for their advantage,
      let them make a donation
      of the property they wish to give to the monastery,
      reserving the income to themselves if they wish.
      And in this way let everything be barred,
      so that the boy may have no expectations
      whereby (which God forbid) he might be deceived and ruined,
      as we have learned by experience.

      Let those who are less well-to-do make a similar offering.
      But those who have nothing at all
      shall simply draw up the document
      and offer their son before witnesses at the oblation.

      REFLECTION

      This is the chapter that allows us to have (and be!) Oblates. How
      different would all of our lives be if this chapter had never been
      written!

      Reflect a moment on how rich your life WOULDN'T be if you had no
      Benedictine family, if the Order had never even been founded. Think about
      brothers, sisters and friends whom you would not know, about what you
      would have missed. For starters, many of us would not be members on at
      least a couple of the forums this appears on- they wouldn't exist! Our wonderful
      fraternity in cyberspace would have never happened at all.

      In my own life there would have been no St. Leo, no Brother Patrick, no
      Petersham or Pluscarden. My college degree would never have happened
      and my dear friend, Jean Ronan, would never have even met me, let alone
      taught me theology.

      Every single thing I ever received from the Benedictine Order, all the example,
      all the awe and joy, and yes, even all the pain that formed me, would never
      have existed, nor would I have had any role in the lives of my Benedictine
      family of brothers and sisters. Nada. Zilch.

      Europe would look a lot different, probably worse, and the Book of Common
      Prayer would be devoid of all those wonderful OSB elements like Morning
      Prayer and Evensong. Even the architecture of Anglican Churches would
      differ: the monastic choir-in-sanctuary style would probably be unknown.

      Often the best way to access a treasure is to imagine its loss. We can take
      for granted things which are of inestimable value. Make today's chapter an
      opportunity for such an assessment. Carry it even further, to some other dear
      and wonderful things in your life. What if there were no Church? What if you had
      no family ? (I know, I know... sometimes that sounds tempting! But even in
      dysfunctional families, you would NEVER be exactly who you are without them.)
      Often the best appreciation of how things are can be had by such reflections!

      We all owe a great, great deal to St. Benedict and to his sons and
      daughters. Let us pray for our Benedictine family and give thanks,
      deep thanks for the gift we have all received!



      Love and prayers,

      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
      +PAX Prayers for Anna, a big move and adjusting to a new home in a different state. The aftermath of hurricane Katrina, prohibitive rents fueled by rising
      Message 2 of 29 , Dec 12, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        +PAX

        Prayers for Anna, a big move and adjusting to a new home in a different
        state. The aftermath of hurricane Katrina, prohibitive rents fueled by rising
        insurance rates meant she had to leave her home of many years, a very tough
        move, but her outlook is positive and full of faith. Prayers of thanks and Deo
        gratias: Margaret, for whom we prayed, has come through her arterial surgery
        well and her daughter, Mary is at home, her pet Luigi well enough to come home,
        too. Blessings on them all! Deo gratias for Gabrielle, for whom we prayed,
        now on meds for her kidney infection and doing well, prayers for Bev, her Mom,
        who is battling a severe and lingering cold. Lord, help us all as You know
        and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
        praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 13, August 13, December 13
        Chapter 59: On the Sons of Nobles and of the Poor Who Are Offered

        If anyone of the nobility
        offers his son to God in the monastery
        and the boy is very young,
        let his parents draw up the document which we mentioned above;
        and at the oblation
        let them wrap the document itself and the boy's hand in the altar
        cloth. That is how they offer him.

        As regards their property,
        they shall promise in the same petition under oath
        that they will never of themselves, or through an intermediary,
        or in any way whatever,
        give him anything
        or provide him with the opportunity of owning anything.
        Or else,
        if they are unwilling to do this,
        and if they want to offer something as an alms to the monastery
        for their advantage,
        let them make a donation
        of the property they wish to give to the monastery,
        reserving the income to themselves if they wish.
        And in this way let everything be barred,
        so that the boy may have no expectations
        whereby (which God forbid) he might be deceived and ruined,
        as we have learned by experience.

        Let those who are less well-to-do make a similar offering.
        But those who have nothing at all
        shall simply draw up the document
        and offer their son before witnesses at the oblation.

        REFLECTION

        This is the chapter that allows us to have (and be!) Oblates. How
        different would all of our lives be if this chapter had never been
        written! While I dwell on the Order as a whole in this reflection, how
        drastically different and how impoverished my life would be without
        Oblates. How very deeply my life is shaped by so many of you and
        how very grateful for that I am!

        Reflect a moment on how rich your life WOULDN'T be if you had no
        Benedictine family, if the Order had never even been founded. Think about
        brothers, sisters and friends whom you would not know, about what you
        would have missed. For starters, many of us would not be members on at
        least a couple of the forums this appears on- they wouldn't exist! Our
        wonderful
        fraternity in cyberspace would have never happened at all.

        In my own life there would have been no St. Leo, no Brother Patrick, no
        Petersham or Pluscarden. My college degree would never have happened
        and my dear friend, Jean Ronan, would never have even met me, let alone
        taught me theology.

        Every single thing I ever received from the Benedictine Order, all the
        example,
        all the awe and joy, and yes, even all the pain that formed me, would never
        have existed, nor would I have had any role in the lives of my Benedictine
        family of brothers and sisters. Nada. Zilch.

        Europe would look a lot different, probably worse, and the Book of Common
        Prayer would be devoid of all those wonderful OSB elements like Morning
        Prayer and Evensong. Even the architecture of Anglican Churches would
        differ: the monastic choir-in-sanctuary style would probably be unknown.

        Often the best way to access a treasure is to imagine its loss. We can take
        for granted things which are of inestimable value. Make today's chapter an
        opportunity for such an assessment. Carry it even further, to some other dear
        and wonderful things in your life. What if there were no Church? What if you
        had
        no family ? (I know, I know... sometimes that sounds tempting! But even in
        dysfunctional families, you would NEVER be exactly who you are without them.)
        Often the best appreciation of how things are can be had by such reflections!

        We all owe a great, great deal to St. Benedict and to his sons and
        daughters. Let us pray for our Benedictine family and give thanks,
        deep thanks for the gift we have all received!



        Love and prayers,

        Jerome, OSB
        _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
        _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
        Petersham, MA



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers, please for three men investigating St. Mary s Monastery vocationally, two are visiting now. May they find God s will for them and do it
        Message 3 of 29 , Dec 11, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          +PAX

          Prayers, please for three men investigating St. Mary's Monastery vocationally, two are visiting now. May they find God's will for them and do it accordingly.

          Lord help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
          mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 12, August 12, December 12
          Chapter 58: On the Manner of Receiving Sisters

          When she is to be received she promises before all in the oratory
          stability, fidelity to monastic life and obedience. This promise
          she shall make before God and His Saints,
          so that if she should ever act otherwise, she may know that she
          will be condemned by Him whom she mocks. Of this promise of hers
          let her draw up a document in the name of the Saints whose relics
          are there and of the Abbess who is present. Let her write this
          document with her own hand; or if she is illiterate, let another
          write it at her request,
          and let the novice put her mark to it. Then let her place it with
          her own hand upon the altar;
          and when she has placed it there, let the novice at once intone
          this verse: "Receive me, O Lord, according to Your word, and I
          shall live: and let me not be confounded in my hope" (Ps. 118
          [119]:116). Let the whole community answer this verse three times
          and add the "Glory be to the Father." Then let the novice prostrate
          herself at each one's feet,
          that they may pray for her. And from that day forward let her be
          counted as one of the community.

          If she has any property, let her either give it beforehand to the
          poor or by solemn donation bestow it on the monastery, reserving
          nothing at all for herself, as indeed she knows that from that day
          forward she will no longer have power even over her own body. At
          once, therefore, in the oratory, let her be divested of her own
          clothes which she is wearing
          and dressed in the clothes of the monastery. But let the clothes of
          which she was divested
          be put aside in the wardrobe and kept there. Then if she should
          ever listen to the persuasions of the devil and decide to leave the
          monastery (which God forbid), she may be divested of the monastic
          clothes and cast out. Her document, however, which the Abbess has
          taken from the altar, shall not be returned to her, but shall be
          kept in the monastery.

          REFLECTION

          The Church approves religious rules. This is the basis for
          asserting that our Holy Rule is inspired by the Holy Spirit,
          because the Church gave its seal of approval. The Church, however,
          is indubitably older and often wiser than monastic life. It predates every
          form of optional religious commitment. It is the blessing of the Church
          which makes official monastic life possible for any and all of us.

          This is just a prelude to saying that the wisdom of the Church long
          ago stopped people from making solemn vows, a life-long commitment
          difficult to break, right out of novitiate. Not only does this
          longer program protect people, to a certain extent, from making a
          mistake, it also spares the monastery from having a lot of
          undesirables with chapter votes running the show. There are many,
          many I have known who left in simple vows for whose exit I remain
          eternally grateful! Thanks be to God that they were never chapter
          members with votes. What a zoo that would have been!

          A year may well have been enough in St. Benedict's time. People had
          vastly shorter life spans, it was a bigger chunk of their lives.
          They also had to grow up more quickly and their options were fewer
          by far than those of our own day.

          Oblates, therefore, can garner a few kernels of truth in this
          chapter about commitment, that bugbear of the baby boomer
          generation and beyond. Modern people find it terribly hard to
          commit, some never manage it at all. As such, a bit of wisdom older
          than our own age may be very useful in our everyday lives.

          Whether it's a marriage or engagement or a job or a volunteer
          chairperson position, don't jump at things. Read the Rule, so to
          speak, three times at least! Look, look, look as mindfully as you
          can at the truth and reality of the situation.

          Benedictines are not people afraid of commitment, but we live in a
          world where many are. Our witness here must be care and balance. We
          must resolutely walk BETWEEN the extremes of foolhardy haste and
          crippling fear. In the world of today, that is no small witness and
          no easy task. Pull this one off, and you have a done a service to
          many, not just to yourself!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for Pat, on her 53rd birthday. Ad multos annos and thanks for the gift of her to so many. Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of
          Message 4 of 29 , Dec 17, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            +PAX

            Prayers for Pat, on her 53rd birthday. Ad multos annos and thanks for the gift of her to so many.

            Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Roberta, for whom we prayed, she has gone to God, and prayers for all who mourn her, especially Todd.

            Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

            Eleanor, a 72 year old lady who fell and is in the hospital undergoing tests.


            a pet dog "Cassie" who is 14 years old and dying. She has been a very close pet for the whole family. Prayers for all her humans, please.



            Tom, glaucoma recently diagnosed, more tests in January to determine the extent.



            Kasey, viral infection,



            Gianna, strep thoat



            Michael S., renal failure.



            Lord, help us all as you know and will. God's will is best. All is mery and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL



            April 18, August 18, December 18
            Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community

            Let all keep their places in the monastery
            established by the time of their entrance,
            the merit of their lives and the decision of the Abbot.
            Yet the Abbot must not disturb the flock committed to him,
            nor by an arbitrary use of his power ordain anything unjustly;
            but let him always think
            of the account he will have to render to God
            for all his decisions and his deeds.

            Therefore in that order which he has established
            or which they already had,
            let the brethren approach to receive the kiss of peace and Communion,
            intone the Psalms and stand in choir.
            And in no place whatever should age decide the order
            or be prejudicial to it;
            for Samuel and Daniel as mere boys judged priests.

            Except for those already mentioned, therefore,
            whom the Abbot has promoted by a special decision
            or demoted for definite reasons,
            all the rest shall take their order
            according to the time of their entrance.
            Thus, for example,
            he who came to the monastery at the second hour of the day,
            whatever be his age or his dignity,
            must know that he is junior
            to one who came at the first hour of the day.
            Boys, however, are to be kept under discipline
            in all matters and by everyone.

            REFLECTION

            St. Benedict, who has stressed fairness in so many ways, even
            equality, also insists on order, hence the title of this chapter. But
            it is an order which is largely established by God: the time of
            entrance. God calls when He chooses, whomever He chooses. When that
            person responds, that, for the most part, is going to determine their
            place in community.

            Families, too, need order. Yes, fairness and equality are important,
            but every child is not the equal of their siblings: anarchy would
            result. Imagine a teenager exactly equal to a toddler sibling, unable
            to interfere at all in the baby's whims to destroy its nursery or
            harm itself.

            We are used to hearing sibling rivalry horror stories that traipse
            far into adult life as psychological baggage. How many of them might
            have been avoided if, as St. Benedict prescribed for his family,
            order was never decided by capriciousness and affection was equal.

            Children cannot understand favoritism and rightly so. But a child
            could be a bit more comfortable with rewards for good behavior,
            "the merit of" their siblings lives. That might annoy them, true, but at
            least it is something they, too, can work towards. Arbitrary
            affectional preference is not.

            Note that St. Benedict leaves the Abbot free to advance anyone for
            his own reasons, but immediately tacks on a warning that the Abbot
            must not disturb his flock and that he must give an account of his
            stewardship. Abbots are human, not infallible. Human affection can
            enter into their choices and St. Benedict warns them against that.
            (PS: They have not always listened, but he did warn them...LOL!)

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB

            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them Betty, for whom we
            Message 5 of 29 , Dec 18, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              +PAX

              Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them

              Betty, for whom we have been praying is at home with hsopice are and in a lot of pain. Her Mom did get to see her after all, Deo gratias, continued prayers for all.

              Elaine, craniotomy after head injury from a fall.

              Bill who we prayed for earlier this year is having problems heart problems.



              Jim who is having problems with depression.



              Alan. He has made the decision to return to the Catholic Church after over 30 years away. Pray that his return to full communion with the Church goes smoothly.


              Harold. He's on his second week of hospitalization. After healing from pneumonia, blood clots were found in his lungs, necessitating another week in the hospital for heparin therapy. Pray the clots dissolve soon and he can go home.

              Heather and Stephen, expecting a child in July, after suffering a miscarriage this past summer.

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
              mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              April 18, August 18, December 18
              Chapter 63: On the Order of the Community

              Let all keep their places in the monastery
              established by the time of their entrance,
              the merit of their lives and the decision of the Abbot.
              Yet the Abbot must not disturb the flock committed to him,
              nor by an arbitrary use of his power ordain anything unjustly;
              but let him always think
              of the account he will have to render to God
              for all his decisions and his deeds.

              Therefore in that order which he has established
              or which they already had,
              let the brethren approach to receive the kiss of peace and Communion,
              intone the Psalms and stand in choir.
              And in no place whatever should age decide the order
              or be prejudicial to it;
              for Samuel and Daniel as mere boys judged priests.

              Except for those already mentioned, therefore,
              whom the Abbot has promoted by a special decision
              or demoted for definite reasons,
              all the rest shall take their order
              according to the time of their entrance.
              Thus, for example,
              he who came to the monastery at the second hour of the day,
              whatever be his age or his dignity,
              must know that he is junior
              to one who came at the first hour of the day.
              Boys, however, are to be kept under discipline
              in all matters and by everyone.

              REFLECTION

              St. Benedict, who has stressed fairness in so many ways, even
              equality, also insists on order, hence the title of this chapter. But
              it is an order which is largely established by God: the time of
              entrance. God calls when He chooses, whomever He chooses. When that
              person responds, that, for the most part, is going to determine their
              place in community.

              Families, too, need order. Yes, fairness and equality are important,
              but every child is not the equal of their siblings: anarchy would
              result. Imagine a teenager exactly equal to a toddler sibling, unable
              to interfere at all in the baby's whims to destroy its nursery or
              harm itself.

              We are used to hearing sibling rivalry horror stories that traipse
              far into adult life as psychological baggage. How many of them might
              have been avoided if, as St. Benedict prescribed for his family,
              order was never decided by capriciousness and affection was equal.

              Children cannot understand favoritism and rightly so. But a child
              could be a bit more comfortable with rewards for good behavior,
              "the merit of" their siblings lives. That might annoy them, true, but at
              least it is something they, too, can work towards. Arbitrary
              affectional preference is not.

              Note that St. Benedict leaves the Abbot free to advance anyone for
              his own reasons, but immediately tacks on a warning that the Abbot
              must not disturb his flock and that he must give an account of his
              stewardship. Abbots are human, not infallible. Human affection can
              enter into their choices and St. Benedict warns them against that.
              (PS: They have not always listened, but he did warn them...LOL!)

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Br. Jerome Leo
              +PAX December 18 O Adonai and Ruler of the house of Israel, You appeared to Moses in the fire of the burning bush, and on Mount Sinai gave him Your Law: Come,
              Message 6 of 29 , Dec 18, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                +PAX

                December 18
                "O Adonai and Ruler of the house of Israel, You appeared to Moses in
                the fire of the burning bush, and on Mount Sinai gave him Your Law:
                Come, and with an outstretched arm redeem us!"

                Adonai, the Hebrew word meaning "Lord" had its vowel points used
                under the divine Name in Hebrew to warn the reader to substitute the
                euphemism "Lord" rather than say God's Name. Applied to Jesus, in
                symbolic shorthand this says that Jesus is the God of the Covenant.
                In NT Greek, this was rendered "Kyrios" and therein lies an
                interesting connection to another antiphon, that of the Magnificat on
                Ascension. There, in the words of St. John's Gospel, Jesus tells His
                Father: "I have made known Your Name." The name here is Yahweh, since
                the Greek referent is Kyrios. In other words, to say Adonai of Jesus
                is plainly to say that Jesus is God, is Yahweh.

                The use of "house" here is in the sense of "family", Jesus is the
                Ruler of the family of Israel. One may see a survival of that usage
                of house in our modern reference to the "house" of Windsor to mean
                the whole royal family. (Believe it or not, the Windsor reference
                came from me, the Yank.)

                The stress of connections between Yahweh and Jesus is repeated twice
                more: it was Jesus Who spoke to Moses in the burning bush, Jesus Who
                gave the Law on Sinai. The first has always been a more popularly
                known patristic idea in the East. I have had Western priests come
                hesitantly close to arguing with me when I have expressed that very
                strong tradition in the East of Christ in the burning bush. Perhaps
                they are to be forgiven for forgetting an antiphon that only comes
                once a year, but lex orandi, lex credendi: the law of prayer is the
                law of faith.

                A third and final identification of Jesus with Yahweh is the image of
                the outstretched arm. The OT is rich with references to this. It is
                with "outstretched arm" that God shows His power and might, leads His
                people out of Egypt, delivers them from dangers. Just as Jesus was
                identified with the burning bush and the Law, so now He is linked to
                the Passover itself.







                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Br. Jerome Leo
                +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Deo gratias,
                Message 7 of 29 , Dec 19, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  +PAX

                  Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                  Deo gratias, Harold, for whom we prayed, has been discharged to his home.

                  Ruth, cardiac ablation to correct an overly fast heartbeat.

                  Jim, job and holiday stress affecting depression.

                  Delores, advanced Lou Gehrig's disease and for her family, difficult choices about her care now.

                  Betty, who has two small brain tumors pressing on her pituitary gland, a reoccurence after surgery to remove a golf ball sized tumor. And for her family, who neglects her terribly.

                  Fred, hospitalized for the past two weeks for atypical pneumonia. He has had to have a tracheotomy and is not responding to the antibiotics, plus he has had to be restrained and sedated. Also your prayers for his worried wife Phyllis, who has herself come down with bronchitis.

                  Josephine and Art, who made their Final Oblation on Sunday. Deo gratias and many years!

                  Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. ALl is mercy and
                  grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                  April 20, August 20, December 20
                  Chapter 64: On Constituting an Abbess

                  In the constituting of an Abbess
                  let this plan always be followed,
                  that the office be conferred on the one who is chosen
                  either by the whole community unanimously in the fear of God
                  or else by a part of the community, however small,
                  if its counsel is more wholesome.

                  Merit of life and wisdom of doctrine
                  should determine the choice of the one to be constituted,
                  even if she be the last of the order of the community.

                  But if (which God forbid)
                  the whole community should agree to choose a person
                  who will acquiesce in their vices,
                  and if those vices somehow become known to the Bishop
                  to whose diocese the place belongs,
                  or to the Abbots, Abbesses or the faithful of the vicinity,
                  let them prevent the success of this conspiracy of the wicked,
                  and set a worthy steward over the house of God.
                  They may be sure
                  that they will receive a good reward for this action
                  if they do it with a pure intention and out of zeal for God;
                  as, on the contrary, they will sin if they fail to do it.

                  REFLECTION

                  Monasteries can forget sometimes that they are not their own, one of
                  the unavoidable risks of Benedictine autonomy. While it was usual, in
                  St. Benedict's day, for monasteries to be under their local bishop
                  (and still is usual in the East today,) St. Benedict says something
                  even more telling. The local laity should intervene if the monastery
                  conspires to elect a loser! Now THAT is going a long way!

                  Monasteries become dear to those around them, and a sense of
                  ownership for their local monastery arises in many hearts. St.
                  Benedict actually endorses that. The monk is not his own, but neither
                  is the whole community. We belong to the Church, we belong to our own
                  locale, we belong to the people in a very special way. It entitles
                  them to warn us that we may have gone amiss and it obliges us to
                  always recall that our monasteries have ripple effects!

                  Many of us in the workplace or school, some of us even in marriage,
                  are forced to deal with people who were NOT chosen for their "merit
                  of life and wisdom of doctrine." That can be very tough, but grace
                  and the Holy Rule are there to strengthen us.

                  The single most important thing the one governed can do to thwart bad
                  government is NOT to mirror the behavior which is at fault. Two
                  wrongs can never make a right. All too often, for whatever reason,
                  people push our buttons and get exactly the sick response from us
                  that they sickly need. Try not to let that happen. Put a control on
                  your buttons. Never stoop to the level that annoys you, and believe
                  me, that stooping is easy to do. It is even commonly (the adjective
                  here is no accidental choice!!) done.

                  Hard and perennial truth, but most of the things which annoy us most
                  in others are our own sins, in one form or another. We are rarely so
                  vigilant or crusading about other matters. We might reflect those
                  faults in different areas, in different ways, but this can only help
                  us in denial. Look, look very carefully at the person who makes you
                  the most angry. Most of us will not have to look honestly for very
                  long to see why we are affected strongly.

                  On another note entirely, for Oblates who are single and dating, what
                  about using the criteria given for an Abbess for checking out a mate?
                  Granted the pickings might be slim, but we should always look to
                  people who are good, who will help us grow spiritually as potential
                  partners. This age, when so many are unchurched, may have convinced
                  many single folks that spirituality is something they can do alone,
                  without their partners. Well, sometimes it is, to be sure, but it is
                  a harder road. Indifference is one thing, but if a partner is
                  downright opposed, it can be a VERY hard road.

                  Love and prayers,
                  Jerome, OSB
                  http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                  Petersham, MA









                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Br. Jerome Leo
                  +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual. mental and phsyical health of all those who suffer from depressions worsened during this holiday season. Prayers for
                  Message 8 of 29 , Dec 20, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    +PAX

                    Prayers, please, for the spiritual. mental and phsyical health of all those who suffer from depressions worsened during this holiday season.

                    Prayers for us in Central Massachusetts, we have a heavy snow storm going on, which is why I am late today. So far, we still have power and all utilities.

                    Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                    April 21, August 21, December 21
                    Chapter 64: On Constituting an Abbess

                    Once she has been constituted,
                    let the Abbess always bear in mind
                    what a burden she has undertaken
                    and to whom she will have to give an account of her stewardship,
                    and let her know that her duty is rather to profit her sisters
                    than to preside over them.
                    She must therefore be learned in the divine law,
                    that she may have a treasure of knowledge
                    from which to bring forth new things and old.
                    She must be chaste, sober and merciful.
                    Let her exalt mercy above judgment,
                    that she herself may obtain mercy.
                    She should hate vices;
                    she should love the sisterhood.


                    In administering correction
                    she should act prudently and not go to excess,
                    lest in seeking too eagerly to scrape off the rust
                    she break the vessel.
                    Let her keep her own frailty ever before her eyes
                    and remember that the bruised reed must not be broken.
                    By this we do not mean that she should allow vices to grow;
                    on the contrary, as we have already said,
                    she should eradicate them prudently and with charity,
                    in the way which may seem best in each case.
                    Let her study rather to be loved than to be feared.


                    Let her not be excitable and worried,
                    nor exacting and headstrong,
                    nor jealous and over-suspicious;
                    for then she is never at rest.


                    In her commands let her be prudent and considerate;
                    and whether the work which she enjoins
                    concerns God or the world,
                    let her be discreet and moderate,
                    bearing in mind the discretion of holy Jacob, who said,
                    "If I cause my flocks to be overdriven,
                    they will all die in one day."
                    Taking this, then, and other examples of discretion,
                    the mother of virtues,
                    let her so temper all things
                    that the strong may have something to strive after,
                    and the weak may not fall back in dismay.


                    And especially let her keep this Rule in all its details,
                    so that after a good ministry
                    she may hear from the Lord what the good servant heard
                    who gave the fellow-servants wheat in due season:
                    "Indeed, I tell you, he will set that one over all his goods" (Matt.
                    24:27).

                    REFLECTION

                    Anyone reading this would perhaps quite rightly think: "Wow!
                    That's a tall order to fill!" They would, of course, be right.

                    Now for the clincher: this is not just a model for Abbots, but for
                    all of us with any authority, in fact, for all of us period. This is
                    the way Benedictines should treat others, seniors, juniors, all
                    people. This Christ-like attitude ought to pervade every parent,
                    teacher, boss, nurse and grocery clerk, all of us. For every one of
                    us the model here is exquisite. Read it over and over and etch it
                    into your very heart. This is St. Benedict at his best!

                    Pay particular attention to the deceptively short paragraph about
                    not being "excitable and worried," along with its other cautions. Its
                    warning that such things mean we shall never be at rest is a very
                    important one. Without such, rest, without a certain level of serenity
                    and peace, the spiritual journey is very, very tough going, indeed.
                    We badly need that restful serenity to focus on Christ and the tasks
                    of our souls at hand.

                    "Now THAT," he said in an unusually short reflection, "is a REALLY
                    tall order!" Sure is! You can only do it with grace, with prayer and
                    God's all-merciful help.

                    Love and prayers,

                    Jerome, OSB
                    http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                    Petersham, MA



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Br. Jerome Leo
                    +PAX O Key of David and Scepter of the house of Israel: You open and none may close, You close and none may open. Come and deliver from the chains of prison
                    Message 9 of 29 , Dec 20, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      +PAX

                      "O Key of David and Scepter of the house of Israel: You open and none
                      may close, You close and none may open. Come and deliver from the
                      chains of prison those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of
                      death."

                      The Hebrew word for key means something that opens, while the Greek and Latin
                      terms both refer to something which closes. Jesus is the Key and He
                      can open us to infinite possibilities, just as He can also close us
                      to shut us away from dangers. He can open our prisons and free us,
                      but He can also lock the city gates for our safety. When He opens,
                      none may close, when He closes, none may open: when Jesus makes an
                      election or decision for us it is irrevocable.

                      The key is a symbol of authority. Even today, in the blessing of an
                      abbot or abbess, a very important symbolic act is the handing over of
                      the keys to the abbey, clearly pointing to the authority enjoyed over
                      it by the one newly blessed. Jesus speaks of the keys of the kingdom
                      on heaven, and demonstrates that He Himself holds them by His ability
                      to hand them over to His Church. Isaiah 22:22 repeats the antiphon
                      almost word for word, but it is not necessarily a messianic passage.
                      It refers to a civil ruler whom God supports. His key of the house of
                      David underscores the approval God gives to all his acts. St. John
                      applies this passage to Jesus, and the liturgy follows suit.

                      Most appropriately, since today we praise the supreme divine
                      authority of Jesus with the symbol of a key, we ask Him to open our
                      prisons of darkness and unlock the chains of sin and death that bind
                      us still. It might be useful to remember that, as He opens, none may
                      close. Hence, if He frees us from sin and death, from the various
                      prisons of darkness we languish in, none may send us back there, save
                      ourselves alone.



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Br. Jerome Leo
                      +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical well-being of the following and for all their loved ones and all taking care of them: Nick. He
                      Message 10 of 29 , Dec 21, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        +PAX

                        Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical well-being of the following and for all their loved ones and all taking care of them:

                        Nick. He has heart problems and now kidney failure. It doesn't look good.

                        Carolyn, for whom we prayed, life support has been removed and the waiting is very hard on Lynda and all concerned.

                        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
                        grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                        April 22, August 22, December 22
                        Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

                        It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
                        gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
                        For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
                        and consider themselves second Abbots.
                        By usurping power
                        they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
                        Especially does this happen
                        in those places where the Prior is constituted
                        by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
                        who constitute the Abbot himself.
                        What an absurd procedure this is
                        can easily be seen;
                        for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
                        from the very time of his constitution,
                        by putting the thought into his mind
                        that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
                        "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
                        by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
                        From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
                        rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
                        For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
                        their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
                        and those who are under them,
                        currying favor with one side or the other,
                        go to ruin.
                        The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
                        rests on the heads of those
                        whose action brought about such disorder.

                        REFLECTION

                        When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
                        side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
                        Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
                        but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
                        That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
                        important.

                        St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
                        own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
                        personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
                        that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
                        they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
                        children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
                        in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

                        Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
                        in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
                        monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
                        said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
                        disciple." One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
                        knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
                        time, we can be convinced we know better. Sometimes, perhaps, we do,
                        but in most cases, obedience is a real protection from harm.
                        Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
                        Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
                        of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

                        One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
                        necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
                        stretch for us adults!

                        Love and prayers,
                        Jerome, OSB
                        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/

                        Petersham, MA

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Br. Jerome Leo
                        +PAX I realize that most modern renderings have O Rising Dawn , but indulge me in this one. As a lover of Gerard Manley Hopkins, I vastly prefer the much more
                        Message 11 of 29 , Dec 21, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          +PAX

                          I realize that most modern renderings have "O Rising Dawn", but
                          indulge me in this one. As a lover of Gerard Manley Hopkins, I vastly
                          prefer the much more poetic "O Dayspring" And besides, who said
                          translation must be pedestrian to be relevant? (It often seems
                          someone must have....) "Daypsring" also carries the hopeful connotation of
                          Spring-to-come, of Resurrection, a powerful thought on the first day of
                          winter!


                          "O Dayspring, Radiance of the Light eternal and Sun of Justice; come
                          and enlighten those who sit in darkness and the shadow of death."

                          I wonder if the appearance of today's sun image landed on the winter
                          solstice accidentally. Given the Middle Ages' fascination with such
                          things, one would suspect it was deliberate choice. Just as the
                          natural sun ebbs to it weakest point, the Sun of Justice Who shall
                          never diminish, is proclaimed. The images today, while reflected in
                          both Old and New Testaments are more from nature than those of the
                          days preceding.

                          Jesus calls Himself the Light and the Life. Surely the sun gives
                          both, and so, here, does the Sun of Justice. We could not live without
                          the sun; our planet would be a barren, frozen wasteland without it.

                          The image of dawn, of the dayspring, holds a further message: the sun
                          at noon is at its peak of light and heat, but the gentler sun of both
                          rising and setting is not only softer and less extreme, but floods
                          the sky and the earth with its lovelier color and majesty. This is yet
                          another
                          repetition of the theme of gentleness/strength.

                          The reference to the Sun of Righteousness (Mal. 4:1-2) contrasts two
                          experiences of the Messianic power "glowing like a furnace." For the wicked,
                          it will burn them like chaff, but for those who fear God's name, "the sun of
                          righteousness shall rise with healing." Jesus' power and majesty and
                          strength are truly a balm to us.

                          Naturally, to Christian (and especially Benedictine!) ears, the most
                          obvious connections here will be those of the Benedictus, the
                          Canticle of Zachary in Luke 1:78-79, the "Oriens ex alto", the
                          dayspring from on high, which shall burst forth and shine on all
                          those "who sit in darkness and the shadow of death." The message
                          today is the end of darkness, the end of shadow, the end of death.
                          The Messiah, the Sun of Righteousness has dispelled them all.

                          The Radiance of the Light eternal is found in Hebrews 1:3 as an
                          attribute of Jesus, the Second Person of the Trinity. My favorite
                          translation, the New English Bible, renders it thus: "...the Son Who
                          is the effulgence of God's splendour and the stamp of God's being and
                          sustains the universe by His word of power." The Son is, as we say in
                          the Creed, truly "Light from Light." He would not have to do anything
                          to end the world, He would have to STOP doing something, stop willing
                          it and us, stop sustaining it. The creation is the daily and ever
                          present act of the Son, something ongoing in His will maintaining all
                          that is.

                          Those who sit in darkness and the shadow of death are not just a
                          group of outsiders. There are many such corners of gloom in our own
                          souls, to which we frequently retire for a holiday from the struggles
                          of grace. Today we invite the Sun to illuminate even those recesses,
                          to leave us no place to hide from Him in the damp and chill of
                          selfishness.








                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Br. Jerome Leo
                          Some folks missed this one, don t know what I did, but here it is at last! December 18 O Adonai and Ruler of the house of Israel, You appeared to Moses in the
                          Message 12 of 29 , Dec 21, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Some folks missed this one, don't know what I did, but here it is at last!

                            December 18
                            "O Adonai and Ruler of the house of Israel, You appeared to Moses in
                            the fire of the burning bush, and on Mount Sinai gave him Your Law:
                            Come, and with an outstretched arm redeem us!"

                            Adonai, the Hebrew word meaning "Lord" had its vowel points used
                            under the divine Name in Hebrew to warn the reader to substitute the
                            euphemism "Lord" rather than say God's Name. Applied to Jesus, in
                            symbolic shorthand this says that Jesus is the God of the Covenant.
                            In NT Greek, this was rendered "Kyrios" and therein lies an
                            interesting connection to another antiphon, that of the Magnificat on
                            Ascension. There, in the words of St. John's Gospel, Jesus tells His
                            Father: "I have made known Your Name." The name here is Yahweh, since
                            the Greek referent is Kyrios. In other words, to say Adonai of Jesus
                            is plainly to say that Jesus is God, is Yahweh.

                            The use of "house" here is in the sense of "family", Jesus is the
                            Ruler of the family of Israel. One may see a survival of that usage
                            of house in our modern reference to the "house" of Windsor to mean
                            the whole royal family. (Believe it or not, the Windsor reference
                            came from me, the Yank.)

                            The stress of connections between Yahweh and Jesus is repeated twice
                            more: it was Jesus Who spoke to Moses in the burning bush, Jesus Who
                            gave the Law on Sinai. The first has always been a more popularly
                            known patristic idea in the East. I have had Western priests come
                            hesitantly close to arguing with me when I have expressed that very
                            strong tradition in the East of Christ in the burning bush. Perhaps
                            they are to be forgiven for forgetting an antiphon that only comes
                            once a year, but lex orandi, lex credendi: the law of prayer is the
                            law of faith.

                            A third and final identification of Jesus with Yahweh is the image of
                            the outstretched arm. The OT is rich with references to this. It is
                            with "outstretched arm" that God shows His power and might, leads His
                            people out of Egypt, delivers them from dangers. Just as Jesus was
                            identified with the burning bush and the Law, so now He is linked to
                            the Passover itself.





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Br. Jerome Leo
                            +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: a promising young
                            Message 13 of 29 , Dec 22, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              +PAX

                              Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                              a promising young lady being led astray by
                              pagan influences and for her father who feels frustrated, fearful and
                              guilty because of his lapses in her upbringing.

                              Deo Gratias: Frank, for whom we prayed is responding to treatment and is no longer in immediate danger. Tests are still required to find out all of what's wrong, though.

                              Len, severe heart problems and now unexplained bleeding (sub rosa-bowel, nose, some in abdomen).

                              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
                              grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                              April 23, August 23, December 23
                              Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

                              To us, therefore, it seems expedient
                              for the preservation of peace and charity
                              that the Abbot have in his hands
                              the full administration of his monastery.
                              And if possible let all the affairs of the monastery,
                              as we have already arranged,
                              be administered by deans according to the Abbot's directions.
                              Thus, with the duties being shared by several,
                              no one person will become proud.


                              But if the circumstances of the place require it,
                              or if the community asks for it with reason and with humility,
                              and the Abbot judges it to be expedient,
                              let the Abbot himself constitute as his Prior
                              whomsoever he shall choose
                              with the counsel of God-fearing brethren.


                              That Prior, however, shall perform respectfully
                              the duties enjoined on him by his Abbot
                              and do nothing against the Abbot's will or direction;
                              for the more he is raised above the rest,
                              the more carefully should he observe the precepts of the Rule.


                              If it should be found that the Prior has serious faults,
                              or that he is deceived by his exaltation and yields to pride,
                              or if he should be proved to be a despiser of the Holy Rule,
                              let him be admonished verbally up to four times.
                              If he fails to amend,
                              let the correction of regular discipline be applied to him.
                              But if even then he does not reform,
                              let him be deposed from the office of Prior
                              and another be appointed in his place who is worthy of it.
                              And if afterwards he is not quiet and obedient in the community,
                              let him even be expelled from the monastery.
                              But the Abbot, for his part, should bear in mind
                              that he will have to render an account to God
                              for all his judgments,
                              lest the flame of envy or jealousy be kindled in his soul.

                              REFLECTION

                              The overwhelming majority of us, myself included, are never going to
                              be a Prior or Prioress. Firm grasp on the obvious there!! What,
                              however, may we glean from this chapter? There are at least several
                              possibilities.

                              First, even if your position gives you a certain level of honor,
                              never be so stupid as to believe it, to become proud, to take
                              yourself far too seriously. Cling to a self-knowledge of your
                              limitations, your sins and failings, especially when being praised.

                              Yes, we are human, yes, it is nice to hear those things, yes,
                              sometimes they are even close to the truth, but praise, rank and
                              honor can be awful traps. Like crack cocaine, they can addict us the
                              first time we really give in to them. Great caution is in order here.

                              Second, every commitment to Christ, Baptism, Oblation or Profession,
                              obliges us to a higher standard of self-control. The Holy Rule,
                              because speaking of a superior official, uses the phrase "raised above the
                              rest." This is given as a reason to more carefully observe the Holy Rule.

                              We should read therein that ANY commitment which separates us
                              and sets us further apart for the service of God means that we must
                              more carefully observe the precepts of the Rule. Even though it can
                              be quite annoying to hear, how often someone will say, immediately
                              after a litany of transgressions the person has committed, "And she
                              is an OBLATE!" (Or Franciscan Third Order, or whatever.) People
                              expect more of us because of our religious inclinations and we should
                              not disappoint them.

                              Third, and perhaps most important of all, no one, save God alone, is
                              indispensable. No one. Want to see the change that your removal from
                              the scene will effect? Stick your forearm into a bucket of water, and
                              then pull it out. Same thing, folks, the waters close right in and
                              things go on quite nicely. The higher water level while our arm was
                              there was only illusion anyway. This fact can work in happy concert
                              with the above warning about taking ourselves too seriously. Usually,
                              when we THINK we're hot stuff, we aren't, and even if we truly are at
                              some point, it is FAR better not to know that, and a LOT easier for
                              the spiritual struggle.

                              Yes, we ARE important, we are infinitely important to God and, as a
                              result, to each other. But what makes us so is holiness and love and
                              struggling for virtue, not power. What makes us most like Him is
                              humility.

                              Love and prayers,
                              Jerome, OSB







                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Br. Jerome Leo
                              +PAX O King of the nations [Gentiles] and Desired of all, You are the cornerstone that binds two into one: Come, and save humankind whom You formed out of
                              Message 14 of 29 , Dec 22, 2008
                              • 0 Attachment
                                +PAX

                                "O King of the nations [Gentiles] and Desired of all, You are the
                                cornerstone that binds two into one: Come, and save humankind whom
                                You formed out of clay."

                                The antiphons before today were heavily Jewish in their Messianic
                                content and this one begins that way, but then presents a radical
                                stumbling to Israel's usual position. The Jews of Jesus' time were not
                                exactly noted for rabid ecumenism. Their customary ecumenical stance was, alas,
                                rather closely akin to that of the Catholic Counter-Reformation: "Someday
                                they'll all come crawling and groveling to us on OUR terms." Sadly, the New
                                Israel can, at times, all too closely resemble the Old in some respects.

                                No problem for the Jews with "King of nations" (Jer. 10:7) or the
                                Desired of all, (Hag.2:8) these fit the old pattern comfortably.
                                There is even a cornerstone tradition in Isaiah 28:16, but "as the
                                foundation of Sion," not a union with all peoples. The jarring note
                                is in "the cornerstone that binds the two into one." This is
                                definitely not the way Israel expected the Gentiles to "wake up and
                                get with it." This is God Himself being the binder, even part of the
                                bond, the very cause of unity. This is that perfect union which does
                                not make those united feel smaller or less, because God Himself is
                                thrown into the breach of union.

                                Just as Christ has broken down the walls dividing us from the Father,
                                so is He also the cause and source of our unity with all humanity.
                                This is very Pauline, expressed in both Eph.2:14 and Gal.3:29 as
                                Christ being the peace between Jew and Gentile. That wall, humanly
                                speaking, between Jew and Gentile was very high. Jews could not eat
                                with Gentiles, many civil observances of foreign lands were
                                proscribed for them and their refusal to follow these was a source of
                                frequent persecution. In Mosaic law, Jewish nationality was conferred
                                by birth from a Jewish mother. The children of a Jewish man and a non-
                                Jewish wife would not even be Jews, a fact still true today.

                                The quote from Galatians has further applications to human
                                unity: "There is no such thing as Jew and Greek, slave and free, male
                                and female; for you are all one person in Christ Jesus. But if you
                                thus belong to Christ, you are the issue of Abraham and so heirs by
                                promise." Here we see not only the wall dividing Jew and Gentile torn
                                down, but even the customary way of becoming Jews and heirs to the
                                promise overthrown. No Jewish male could confer birth membership in Israel.
                                It travelled through the mother. Christ makes it clear that He unites
                                all in a new dispensation, one which supersedes the old. It is
                                significant that a role limited to women, in an age that scorned
                                them, is ascribed to Jesus by St. Paul, hardly the greatest fan of
                                women himself, without so much as a shrug of apology.

                                The Old Israel cherishes promises and waits for their fulfillment.
                                The New Israel, in its delight that the Messiah has come, often
                                forgets that it, too, must wait for the fulfillment of the promise
                                and that the waiting is terrible, painful frustration. No one can
                                look at the quote from Galatians and smugly assume that we are there.
                                Anti-Semitism, racism, xenophobia, religious hatreds,
                                misogyny and misandry color our world and sometimes even our Church.
                                Hate crimes fill the news all too often. (Once would be too often...)
                                We have made a stab at slave and free, but little more than that.

                                What we miss is that these changes have already been effected,
                                perfectly, in Christ. The unity, the equality, promises are here:
                                they are REAL. All that impedes their full realization is just that:
                                their "real-ization" and discovery in our human hearts. The way to
                                bring about the promise is to live as if it were already here:
                                because it is! If every person did that, even to their own personal
                                cost and detriment, you would see changes in our world and churches
                                literally overnight.

                                Lastly, there is a reality check that is not too palatable to our
                                modern ears, the reminder that we were formed out of clay. Several
                                decades of self-affirming pop psychology in the late 20th century may
                                have done their work a bit too well in some of us. The Latin "limus"
                                which is here rather flatteringly rendered as "clay" has the more
                                common sense of "mud, slime, or mire." Even if we now realize that
                                the creation of humanity was not a literal case of God making patty-
                                cake with clay, the message here is quite clear. The most cursory
                                examination of conscience will reveal how close to our origins we can
                                often slip. (You potters out there should pardon the pun...)

                                If this reflection may have inflamed a few, please do not blame Abbot
                                Lawrence. Most of this was me, after reading Parsch.






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Br. Jerome Leo
                                +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Brittany,
                                Message 15 of 29 , Dec 23, 2008
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  +PAX

                                  Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                                  Brittany, continued healing from dental surgery.

                                  Margaret who is in denial about melanomas that are greatly concerning the specialist

                                  Wyn who is having a series of scans for problems in her throat and neck .

                                  Peter and Ann on their 36th wedding anniversary

                                  Deo gratias: Bill who had a heart attack is doing better. He had 2 stints put in and there was no lasting damage from the heart attack. He is on a strict do nothing regimen which his wife will enforce.

                                  Lord, help us all as
                                  You know and will. God's wi;; is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never
                                  absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                  April 24, August 24, December 24
                                  Chapter 66: On the Porter of the Monastery

                                  At the gate of the monastery
                                  let there be placed a wise old woman,
                                  who knows how to receive and to give a message,
                                  and whose maturity will prevent her from straying about.
                                  This porter should have a room near the gate,
                                  so that those who come may always find someone at hand
                                  to attend to their business.
                                  And as soon as anyone knocks or a poor person hails her,
                                  let her answer "Thanks be to God" or "A blessing!"
                                  Then let her attend to them promptly,
                                  with all the meekness inspired by the fear of God
                                  and with the warmth of charity.

                                  Should the porter need help,
                                  let her have one of the younger sisters.

                                  If it can be done,
                                  the monastery should be so established
                                  that all the necessary things,
                                  such as water, mill, garden and various workshops,
                                  may be within the enclosure,
                                  so that there is no necessity
                                  for the sisters to go about outside of it,
                                  since that is not at all profitable for their souls.

                                  We desire that this Rule be read often in the community,
                                  so that none of the sisters may excuse herself
                                  on the ground of ignorance.

                                  REFLECTION

                                  Modern monasteries in our Order rarely have gatehouses, let alone
                                  porters waiting at them. In one way, that's too bad, because one
                                  often sees visitors come to a monastery without a clue as to where to
                                  go first, or how to contact someone. On the other hand, it would
                                  wasteful to employ one person full-time at such an endeavor in our
                                  smaller communities of today, since whole days may go by in many
                                  places with few or none needing assistance.

                                  What we have today is the phone, and phone manners are how this best
                                  translates into modern life for both Oblates and professed. I have
                                  certainly known monks who have answered the phone with an attitude
                                  that vaguely said: "You've got some nerve putting me out like this,
                                  disturbing me, etc." One certainly wouldn't want to call such a
                                  monastery twice. If one had never called one before, it is unlikely
                                  that one would want to try another, to go for 2 out of 3, just in
                                  case. See the responsibility we have?

                                  When a phone or doorbell rings, whether in a great Benedictine abbey
                                  or an urban Benedictine apartment, we have the opportunity to
                                  practice the hospitable grace that the Holy Rule requires of all.
                                  Dorothy Day's friend and mentor, Father Hugo, used to say that we
                                  love God as much as the one we love the least.

                                  That would readily translate here. I LOVE to see certain guests arrive,
                                  look forward to it as soon as I hear they are coming. Those are not the
                                  receptions on which I should judge my hospitality. The tough-to-love
                                  ones are.

                                  The point here is that we ARE Benedictines, whether our answering
                                  style of door or phone makes that evident or not. I might not like to think
                                  so, but the anonymity of just saying "Hello," one the phone, without my
                                  name or title does not entitle me to be harsh or gruff or rude. All of us are
                                  bound by something Benedictine within us to be kind and gracious to all
                                  who call or visit.

                                  Someone who calls the guesthouse for the first time can be driven
                                  away or attracted by the way they are dealt with on the phone.
                                  A vocation could driven away by a smartingly cold response. To
                                  risk alienating someone because of our own moods might mean that we
                                  cheat someone out of a spiritual respite they sorely need.

                                  I can't tell you how many people who just called us out of nowhere in the
                                  last 12 years have become real members of our family, greatly
                                  beneficial to themselves and to us. Anyone of those first experiences
                                  could have been irreparably soured by a cranky phone manner. Look at
                                  what all of us would have lost had that happened.

                                  Love and prayers,
                                  Jerome, OSB
                                  http:www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                  jeromeleo@...
                                  Petersham, MA






                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Br. Jerome Leo
                                  +PAX Since the 24th is First Vespers of Christmas, actually beginning the solemnity, today s antiphon is the last of the great O Antiphons. The Roman Church
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Dec 23, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    +PAX

                                    Since the 24th is First Vespers of Christmas, actually beginning the
                                    solemnity, today's antiphon is the last of the great O Antiphons. The
                                    Roman Church formerly made more extensive use of the Jewish custom of
                                    beginning feasts the night before, spanning sunset to sunset, but now
                                    reserves that practice for Sundays and solemnities. Too bad, in a
                                    way. First Vespers of many lesser feasts used to be a joy, and it was
                                    a further connection to our Jewish roots.

                                    A bit of trivia, for which I am indebted to Joyce, who learned it in a
                                    Dominican
                                    college in the 50's. If you take the first letters of the second words (after
                                    the initial O,) which begin each antiphon, you get the acronym: SARCORE.
                                    Read backwards, on Dec. 24, that spells "Ero cras" Latin for "Tomorrow I
                                    will be (there)".
                                    Now some monastic of the Middle Ages must have had a lot of time on his (or
                                    her!)
                                    hands to figure that one out.


                                    "O Emmanuel, our King and Lawgiver, the Expected of Nations and their
                                    Savior: come, and save us, O Lord our God!"

                                    Emmanuel- God with us- this was a radical fulfillment of the
                                    Messianic prophecies which the Jews had never dreamed would happen: a
                                    divine Messiah. Though the promises all refer to and fit Jesus, the
                                    Messiah expected by the Israelites was not divine. To their
                                    reasoning, none could be literally divine, really the Son of God.
                                    Their expectation of a saving ruler did not assume that God would
                                    share His very nature and essence with the Anointed One.

                                    Emmanuel reflects an entirely Christian and entirely new theology,
                                    one of Incarnation and an immanence hitherto unknown. God with us,
                                    sharing every hardship of humanity in His own flesh, dwelling not in
                                    a Temple spiritually, but as flesh and blood among humanity, wishing
                                    to remain with us until the end of time. This is a dramatic contrast
                                    to the affection, yet distance with which the Lord was regarded in
                                    the Old Testament.

                                    Emmanuel- God with us- it finally springs the liturgical construct
                                    of "waiting" all these weeks and admits that we knew He was there all
                                    along. Advent has that flavor, of a pretended waiting for Him Whom we
                                    know to have already arrived. We place ourselves in the shoes of
                                    those who had Him not in order to better appreciate Him Whom we have
                                    had all along.

                                    We hail Christ as King and Lawgiver (Isaiah 32:22,) and echo the
                                    dying words of Jacob in Gen. 49:10, " The scepter will not pass from
                                    Judah, nor a ruler form his thigh, till He comes that is to be sent.
                                    He is the expectation of the nations." We ask Him to save us. The
                                    Latin "Salva" , the imperative form of "to save," is related
                                    to "salus", health, wholeness. We are asking for a holistic well-
                                    being of mind, soul and body when we thus ask to be saved. We
                                    are, in fact, asking to finally be made perfect, fully whole and sound,
                                    something only God can do!

                                    Lastly, we no longer beat around the bush, (burning or otherwise!) We
                                    come right out and directly call Jesus "our Lord and our God." It is
                                    the crowning acclamation of faith to a long season of expectation.

                                    A blessed late Advent and Christmas to you all. I have enjoyed
                                    sharing these with you because I truly feel they are the best poetry
                                    left in the liturgy of the West, even beating out the now pared-down
                                    Exultet at Easter!









                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Br. Jerome Leo
                                    +PAX A very blessed and holy Christmas to you all. May Christ bring each of us ever closer and closer to Himself. Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Dec 24, 2008
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      +PAX

                                      A very blessed and holy Christmas to you all. May Christ bring each of us ever closer and closer to Himself.

                                      Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of Jim, who had prostate surgery in April now undergoing chemo because they were not able to get it all. He is tired and weak continually, now, but still in good spirits. And for all his loved ones and all who take care of him.

                                      Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                      April 25, August 25, December 25
                                      Chapter 67: On Brethren Who Are Sent on a Journey

                                      Let the brethren who are sent on a journey
                                      commend themselves
                                      to the prayers of all the brethren and of the Abbot;
                                      and always at the last prayer of the Work of God
                                      let a commemoration be made of all absent brethren.

                                      When brethren return from a journey,
                                      at the end of each canonical Hour of the Work of God
                                      on the day they return,
                                      let them lie prostrate on the floor of the oratory
                                      and beg the prayers of all
                                      on account of any faults
                                      that may have surprised them on the road,
                                      through the seeing or hearing of something evil,
                                      or through idle talk.
                                      And let no one presume to tell another
                                      whatever he may have seen or heard outside of the monastery,
                                      because this causes very great harm.
                                      But if anyone presumes to do so,
                                      let him undergo the punishment of the Rule.
                                      And let him be punished likewise who would presume
                                      to leave the enclosure of the monastery
                                      and go anywhere or do anything, however small,
                                      without an order from the Abbot.

                                      REFLECTION

                                      Rare is the person who can manage to stay employed without at least a
                                      slightly different persona at work. We are one thing there, because
                                      we have to be, but when we clock out, much, if not all of the work
                                      persona is shed. In fact, we usually have a whole repertoire of
                                      different selves, being one thing with our grandmother and quite
                                      another with a childhood friend we have known all our lives, one
                                      thing with the promising new date and quite another with the spouse
                                      of many years!

                                      Secular society has enlarged upon this tendency to its own ends.
                                      Because the tendency is so deeply rooted in us, we may fail to see
                                      its dangers when carried to extremes. Thanks to a society often
                                      glaringly unassisted by revelation, we have the unhappy concept of
                                      different umbrellas, different sets of ethics to cover different
                                      areas of life. "Hey, religion is fine if you want it, but this is
                                      BUSINESS!" or "I may be a Christian, but this is public service. I
                                      was elected by a constituency that expected me to leave some of that
                                      Gospel stuff at the door." Well, folks, such notions do not always
                                      wash well. In fact, they really don't wash at all.

                                      The message of the Holy Rule and of the Gospel is that there is one
                                      umbrella, period. There is one persona, period. Granted, in the
                                      latter, shades and gradations may last throughout most of our
                                      struggling lives, but the goal is clear. All monastic, all Christian,
                                      all the time. One heart, one umbrella, one Lord, one faith, one
                                      baptism.

                                      That work persona that we drop when we clock out, the totally free
                                      and other person we are on days off or on trips away can be an OK
                                      notion in relation to work. Wouldn't we find someone who was a
                                      salesperson or teacher or secretary or manager ALL the time to be a
                                      dreadful drip? The concept fails, however, when it is applied to
                                      vocations, to any vocation at all. One does not take a vacation from
                                      being married or a parent or ordained or a monastic.

                                      Do I hear loud screams in cyber-space as I mention BALANCE again?
                                      Sorry, but it is true. There is a balanced way to be under one
                                      umbrella all the time that we must strive to achieve. Yes, I am
                                      different with different friends, we all are, we have to be, charity
                                      demands that. But there is a commonality between all the threads of
                                      our behavior. We are monastics. We are freer within defined limits.
                                      It is to the balance of those defined limits that this chapter refers.

                                      At Petersham, we still follow this custom of prayer for one who will
                                      be away overnight. The prayers are said in the refectory, after
                                      grace. One is blessed leaving and returning, while kneeling in the
                                      center of the ref. It's just a way of saying, as a community, that we
                                      all know that maintaining that one umbrella can be tough, especially
                                      when one is away alone. We want to support each other with our
                                      prayers, we want our brother to know that our hearts are with him all
                                      the way.

                                      Love and prayers,
                                      Jerome, OSB
                                      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                      Petersham, MA





                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Br. Jerome Leo
                                      +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following and for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Herb s wife,
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Dec 25, 2008
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        +PAX

                                        Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following and for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                                        Herb's wife, ovarian cancer.

                                        Ian, brain tumor, prognosis uncertain

                                        Continued prayers for Michael, discharged to his home, for healing of his renal problems.

                                        Prayers, please, for all who have lost someone dear over the holidays. It
                                        can be so awful for them and then the pain can recur year after year. Prayers,
                                        too, for all those addicts for whom this season of feasting in food and drink
                                        can be a particularly trying time of temptation. May God bless and strengthen
                                        them all. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All
                                        is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                        April 26, August 26, December 26
                                        Chapter 68: If a Sister Is Commanded to Do Impossible Things

                                        If it happens
                                        that difficult or impossible tasks are laid on a sister,
                                        let her nevertheless receive the order of the one in authority
                                        with all meekness and obedience.
                                        But if she sees that the weight of the burden
                                        altogether exceeds the limit of her strength,
                                        let her submit the reasons for her inability
                                        to the one who is over her
                                        in a quiet way and at an opportune time,
                                        without pride, resistance, or contradiction.
                                        And if after these representations
                                        the Superior still persists in her decision and command,
                                        let the subject know that this is for her good,
                                        and let her obey out of love,
                                        trusting in the help of God.

                                        REFLECTION

                                        Buried in chapters whose names may throw us off there are usually
                                        gems, one just has to dig a bit more carefully. Granted, impossible
                                        tasks are rarely asked of anyone these days, much less Oblates who
                                        live outside the monastery, but there is a beautiful method given
                                        here which has the widest of applications.

                                        Most interpersonal conflict arises from one being or feeling wronged.
                                        Escalation often follows when one tries to express their displeasure
                                        to the offender. Even people who are truly wrong do not enjoy being
                                        humiliated or treated as if they were nothing. Upset by another's
                                        actions, it is easy to lose one's cool. When both parties blow up, a
                                        relentless cycle of discord is born.

                                        The method given here for approaching one's superior is a masterpiece
                                        of crisis intervention and prevention for almost any situation in
                                        life:

                                        "...in a quiet way and at an opportune time, without pride,
                                        resistance, or contradiction."

                                        We ought to carve that on the walls of every mediation center in the
                                        world, on the doors to every marriage counselor and above every
                                        complaint desk (or, as they euphemize them these days, "Customer
                                        Service," but what's in a name?)

                                        Look at what is called for here: composure and calm, timing, respect
                                        for the other person (Gandhi would even say love for the foe,) non-
                                        violence and non-contentiousness. Use this approach with
                                        disagreements and many of them will melt away. One reason Gandhi's
                                        non-violence worked was that he employed all of these things, the
                                        opponent was never denied her worth or dignity. When his followers
                                        pared the list, they failed. This is the recipe for lasting results,
                                        not for a temporary subjugation.

                                        Jesus, of course, gives us a three step process to redress wrongs: go
                                        to the person alone, if that doesn't work go with a witness, if even
                                        that fails, then haul them up before the whole assembly. We can
                                        consider ourselves absolved if we follow all those steps and may feel
                                        justified, but if we undertake ANY of those steps, especially the
                                        first one, without the calm prescribed by St. Benedict, our effort is
                                        all but guaranteed to fail. We can sputter out: "I went to her and I
                                        got NOWHERE!" Ah, yes, but HOW did you go? "He wouldn't even listen
                                        to the whole community!" Neither would you, if made to feel that
                                        small and worthless in public.

                                        Very often our manner of dealing with others says a great deal about
                                        how we esteem ourselves. A balanced dignity and self-love is shown in
                                        the Holy Rule's approach. It will go a longer way toward ending
                                        conflict than a "wronged prima donna" move. Sometimes prima donnas
                                        of either gender are filled with angry self-hatred.

                                        Watch people fight and it will be easy to see that many consider any
                                        slight or offense against themselves to be THE original sin. Sigh...
                                        Give people like that a lot of room. Being wrong is not a capital
                                        offense, everybody does it at one time or another. People who
                                        demonstrate anything else by their actions damage their own standing
                                        in the group as well, and rightly so.

                                        Remember that every disagreement hurts the whole group. A family at
                                        dinner with two not speaking is a tense affair. You cannot calm a
                                        child by saying "This is between your Father and me! It has nothing
                                        to do with you." But it does, it really does. A community in choir
                                        after a huge blow-up between two members is not an exquisite taste of
                                        mystical prayer. Everybody suffers. That's why fixing these fender-
                                        benders is so important and why St. Benedict gave us a way that is so
                                        very likely to achieve results.

                                        Now THAT'S creative peacemaking!

                                        Love and prayers,
                                        Jerome, OSB
                                        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                        Petersham, MA



                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Br. Jerome Leo
                                        +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Br. Philip, who died Christmas Eve, and prayers for the brothers at Weston Priory. Prayers, please, for
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Dec 26, 2008
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          +PAX

                                          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Br. Philip, who died Christmas Eve, and prayers for the brothers at Weston Priory.

                                          Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                                          a baby born to a drug addicted Mom, up for adoption by the courts.

                                          Linda, completed round two of chemo well, four more to go.

                                          Victoria's Dad, off life support, but not expected to be discharged till New Year's, and for Victoria's visit with him.

                                          Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All ismercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                          April 27, August 27, December 27
                                          Chapter 69: That the Monks Presume Not to Defend One Another

                                          Care must be taken that no monk presume on any ground
                                          to defend another monk in the monastery,
                                          or as it were to take him under his protection,
                                          even though they be united by some tie of blood-relationship.
                                          Let not the monks dare to do this in any way whatsoever,
                                          because it may give rise to most serious scandals.
                                          But if anyone breaks this rule,
                                          let him be severely punished.

                                          REFLECTION

                                          We are all supposed to bear one another's burdens. That should be
                                          more than enough help for anyone, if we actually keep that principle.

                                          A big problem with becoming the protector of another, self-appointed
                                          or otherwise, is that it destroys one's peace needlessly. When I was
                                          a novice, there was one other novice I really did not want to lose.
                                          He was not the brightest bulb on the tree and I went out of my way to
                                          protect him from himself. In time, he came to resent this and I was
                                          so busy worrying about covering or preventing his foibles all the
                                          time that I spent little time focusing on my own novitiate. Of
                                          course, he left. He was supposed to leave. I, however, could not see
                                          that at the time.

                                          This isn't just about monasteries, it's about any human group. Taking
                                          someone under our wing can result in all sorts of false assumptions.
                                          It can fool us into thinking we can really control events more than
                                          we can. It can lead us, a la Mother Hen, to seek to control the one
                                          under wing in very unnecessary and unhealthy ways. Its most common
                                          error is also one of its most dangerous ones: it leads us to think in
                                          terms of "us-and-them." There is no "them" in a healthy monastery or
                                          family or Christian community, only an "us".

                                          As usual, what the Holy Rule insists we avoid is an extreme. This
                                          chapter is NOT saying we should not look out for one another, just
                                          that no one should presume that the job is hers alone. Good families
                                          protect all their members, but it is a corporate activity, something
                                          in which all participate. Destroy that balance and the others will
                                          notice quickly. It upsets the inner peace, both of the individual and
                                          the group.

                                          Part of any monastic's struggle, in cloister or in the world, is the
                                          painful facing up to ourselves, that confrontation with our own
                                          flaws. This difficult self-knowledge is essential to the monastic
                                          way. Trying to protect someone from this process is counter to the
                                          very reason they came. It not only harms them, it harms us. It
                                          keeps us so busy with another's affairs that we can avoid looking
                                          at our own failings: a distraction we may perilously cherish!

                                          Merton once told his junior monk students that there is an
                                          existential place of loneliness in every monk that no one can touch,
                                          and that this is the way it's supposed to be, that no one should try
                                          to reach it. That's where the struggle goes on, that's where there is
                                          only God and the self. That's the arena in which the action happens.

                                          Every person, every employee, every spouse and child has a similar
                                          place: it is the place of great potential learning and growth. Our deep
                                          respect for one another must stand away from that space. Becoming
                                          self-appointed guardians of another violates that space.

                                          Love and prayers,
                                          Jerome, OSB
                                          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                          jeromeleo@...
                                          Petersham, MA




                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Br. Jerome Leo
                                          +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and for all who take care of them: Alex and
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Dec 27, 2008
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            +PAX

                                            Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and for all who take care of them:

                                            Alex and Brie, strains on their relationship owing to a move by Alex to another state.

                                            Ann and her family, especially her Mom, in rapidly declining health and her daughter, Jesse, and her new grandson and for Ann and her son.

                                            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                            April 28, August 28, December 28
                                            Chapter 70: That No One Venture to Punish at Random

                                            Every occasion of presumption
                                            shall be avoided in the monastery,
                                            and we decree that no one be allowed
                                            to excommunicate or to strike any of her sisters
                                            unless the Abbess has given her the authority.
                                            Those who offend in this matter
                                            shall be rebuked in the presence of all,
                                            that the rest may have fear.

                                            But children up to 15 years of age
                                            shall be carefully controlled and watched by all,
                                            yet this too with all moderation and discretion.
                                            All, therefore, who presume
                                            without the Abbess' instructions
                                            to punish those above that age
                                            or who lose their temper with them,
                                            shall undergo the discipline of the Rule;
                                            for it is written,
                                            "Do not to another what you would not want done to yourself" (Tobias
                                            4:16).

                                            REFLECTION

                                            "Every occasion of presumption should be avoided in the monastery."
                                            This is about a lot more than saying who can punish whom. This is
                                            pointing out that, whenever there are more than one to be considered,
                                            absolute freedom cannot exist. This is about central authority, yes,
                                            but it is also about the total way one conducts oneself in a home or
                                            group that others share.

                                            Ever think about your first home away from your parents house? It was
                                            probably different in a lot of ways, especially if you lived there
                                            alone. Heady freedom that! I recall my own first place very well and
                                            fondly. However, I can assure you, I could not have lived as I did
                                            there had I been in a family, with younger siblings at home. (OK, it
                                            was 1969, so go figure...)

                                            Even alone, however, I was not free to play my stereo at undue
                                            volumes at 3 AM. We live on a common planet, at some point ALL of our
                                            lives touch others. When they do, control of some sort is necessary
                                            if people are to live in peace.

                                            There is a great and treacherous myth of individualism among
                                            Americans and, to a lesser extent, I think, among all Western
                                            European cultures. Non-western cultures often have a much more highly
                                            developed sense of sharing and commonality. The American nonsense
                                            of "God-bless-the-child-that's-got-his-own" does justice to neither
                                            God nor the child!

                                            Schweitzer pointed out that Europeans found the Africans lazy,
                                            because they would not work to a point of exhaustion without need.
                                            They worked all right, but when the work was done, they quit. They
                                            had a casual and natural attitude to work, proper to their own
                                            economic system, that drove the Europeans nuts, because the latter
                                            had more of a 40-hours-a-week-and-then-you-rest notion. Both
                                            Schweitzer and I tend to side with the natives on this one!

                                            That myth of total freedom, of self-sufficiency being able to buy one
                                            the right to any activity is totally wrong. Even at 20, in my richly
                                            bohemian digs that I called "Shackri-la", I was not totally free. I
                                            didn't know it well enough back then, but I wasn't. I had no right to waste
                                            water or leave lights on all night or drive drunk. My fantasy might have
                                            been chronologically appropriate as Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco,
                                            but hey, even there, even then, people were not morally free in any absolute
                                            sense. None of us are.

                                            Every presumed domain of our control exists on a planet shared by
                                            billions. No one of us is an island. Our complete interdependence is
                                            not only objective fact, it is our only hope. You might never have
                                            read this chapter as an ad for ecological consciousness, but look at
                                            the first line again. We are ALWAYS in this with others and that
                                            always means responsibilities to "...not do to another what one would
                                            not have done to oneself."

                                            Love and prayers,
                                            Jerome, OSB
                                            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org

                                            Petersham, MA













                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Br. Jerome Leo
                                            +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Robert and for all who mourn him. Prayers, please for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Dec 28, 2008
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              +PAX

                                              Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Robert and for all who mourn him.

                                              Prayers, please for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                                              Salome and her Mom, taking care of her Mom is becoming nearly full-time for Salome and many difficulties arise.

                                              Brittany, that she complete her dental work smoothly and stay well.

                                              Frances an elderly woman who is in the hospital with serious medical problems.

                                              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                              April 29, August 29, December 29
                                              Chapter 71: That the Brethren Be Obedient to One Another

                                              Not only is the boon of obedience
                                              to be shown by all to the Abbot,
                                              but the brethren are also to obey one another,
                                              knowing that by this road of obedience they are going to God.
                                              Giving priority, therefore, to the commands of the Abbot
                                              and of the Superior appointed by him
                                              (to which we allow no private orders to be preferred),
                                              for the rest
                                              let all the juniors obey their seniors
                                              with all charity and solicitude.
                                              But if anyone is found contentious,
                                              let him be corrected.

                                              And if any brother,
                                              for however small a cause,
                                              is corrected in any way by the Abbot or by any of his Superiors,
                                              or if he faintly perceives
                                              that the mind of any Superior is angered or moved against him,
                                              however little,
                                              let him at once, without delay,
                                              prostrate himself on the ground at his feet
                                              and lie there making satisfaction
                                              until that emotion is quieted with a blessing.
                                              But if anyone should disdain to do this,
                                              let him undergo corporal punishment
                                              or, if he is stubborn, let him be expelled from the monastery.

                                              REFLECTION

                                              OK, now we're getting into radical. Any human group, from the
                                              military to a kindergarten at recess expects one to obey the leader.
                                              But each other? Give me a break! How many jobs would you have quit if
                                              you had to obey all of your co-workers? Yet St. Benedict calls such
                                              obedience a "boon", a wonderfully good thing.

                                              Well, giving a break is exactly what is intended here. The Kingdom of
                                              God, which the Holy Rule seeks to guide us to, is ruled by love, not
                                              hierarchy per se. It includes a hierarchy, yes, but that, too, is
                                              founded on love. The Kingdom of God strives for peace and serenity.

                                              The quickest way to soften an environment and let peace flourish is
                                              to keep people more or less happy, and the quickest way to do that is
                                              to give in to their legitimate wishes whenever possible. So long as the
                                              matter at hand is morally neutral, why not give way?

                                              Now we're getting to the heroic stuff. There are ulterior benefits to
                                              obeying the boss, but another peer? What's the big deal there? The
                                              big deal is love, the big deal is forgetfulness of self, the big deal
                                              is the abdication of control issues.

                                              Monastic struggle will not free one who is attached to control. It
                                              will thwart the good of the struggle. Don't beat yourself up too
                                              badly on this one if you live in the world, because many, many
                                              monastics in cloisters fail it as well. It is one of Satan's
                                              sneakiest tricks and he enjoys its effectiveness immensely. What
                                              could be better than something the poor victims hardly notice at all,
                                              that eats up their hard work like a ravenous cancer? Very, very handy.

                                              I am tempted to say that anyone who is addicted to control- at any
                                              stage of monastic life- ought to be set to cleaning bathrooms until
                                              the feeling passes. Hey, that would be a great idea, but most
                                              monasteries do not have that many toilets. Sad, but true.

                                              Rather than worry about the pathetic individuals so addicted, who can
                                              make life so unpleasant for those they live with, why not just focus on
                                              changing ourselves? We can be part of the solution. We can go out of
                                              our way to make life easier for each other. We can pray for those who
                                              don't.

                                              A horrible truth of monastic life is that if one waits for everyone
                                              to get perfect (according, of course, to one's own standards!) the
                                              result will be futile and frustrated stagnation. Community we may be,
                                              but all on the same page we shall never be till heaven, and maybe not
                                              even there!

                                              It's a snap to be a pain. Anybody can pull that off with no effort at
                                              all. Lots of folks do, all the time! The harvest, however, is
                                              isolation and loneliness, which result in bitterness that only fuels
                                              the vicious cycle.

                                              In contrast, it is a bit difficult at first to be easy, but it is
                                              ALSO addictive when done right! One will soon be hunting for ways to
                                              be easy, because every drop of water makes the ocean a tiny bit less
                                              salty. The harvest, too, is far more precious: a growing warmth that
                                              makes one ever more gentle, more open, more loving and glad to be so.
                                              The harvest is joy and love, not the lie of possession and bitterness.
                                              You may not change the world alone, but the change in yourself will be
                                              awesome and dramatic. That alone will go farther still to improve the
                                              world, to build up the Mystical Body of Christ.

                                              It is very unlikely that you will ever be able to cure a control
                                              freak. Give them a lot of room, because (harsh saying here!) they can be
                                              truly a danger to your serenity. Cultivate among your peers an attitude
                                              of complete non-control, of nearly total indifference to detail,
                                              rather like the old peace poster that said: "What if they gave a war
                                              and no one came?".

                                              Maybe, just maybe, the wizard might one day wake up to actually see
                                              that Oz is not with her! That's about your only hope. People like
                                              this can profit us by being crosses and we can grow from praying for
                                              them, but getting sucked into their hopelessly false view of reality
                                              is a fatal mistake.

                                              Love and prayers,
                                              Jerome, OSB





                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • Br. Jerome Leo
                                              +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Donna, and for her husband, John, and all who mourn her. Prayers for the spiritual, mental and
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Dec 30, 2008
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                +PAX

                                                Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Donna, and for her husband, John, and all who mourn her.

                                                Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                                                Doris and Normand. Doris has been diagnosed with cancer in her liver, stomach and brain. Her reactions to chemo have been bad and doctors have given her 1 month to live. Her husband Normand is in the advanced stages of Alzheimers.

                                                Baby Charlie is just three and half months old. He is to undergo tests this coming week to determine whether the tumor in his liver is operable. Please keep Charlie, his brother, Jack, and his mom and dad- Hayley and David - in your prayers

                                                Alma and her family. She is close to death; fpr her happy death and eternal rest and for all who will mourn her.

                                                Bill, who's been ill for some time, but was just diagnosed with bone cancer. He has been away from the Church for many years; prayers he'll come to receive the sacraments again.

                                                B., violent and frequent epilepsy.

                                                Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
                                                grace. God is never absent, praise HIm! Thanks so much. JL

                                                May 1, August 31, December 31
                                                Chapter 73: On the Fact That the Full Observance of Justice Is Not
                                                Established in This Rule

                                                Now we have written this Rule
                                                in order that by its observance in monasteries
                                                we may show that we have attained some degree of virtue
                                                and the rudiments of the religious life.

                                                But for those who would hasten to the perfection of that life
                                                there are the teaching of the holy Fathers,
                                                the observance of which leads to the height of perfection.
                                                For what page or what utterance
                                                of the divinely inspired books of the Old and New Testaments
                                                is not a most unerring rule for human life?
                                                Or what book of the holy Catholic Fathers
                                                does not loudly proclaim
                                                how we may come by a straight course to our Creator?
                                                Then the Conferences and the Institutes
                                                and the Lives of the Fathers,
                                                as also the Rule of our holy Father Basil --
                                                what else are they but tools of virtue
                                                for right-living and obedient monks?
                                                But for us who are lazy and ill-living and negligent
                                                they are a source of shame and confusion.

                                                Whoever you are, therefore,
                                                who are hastening to the heavenly homeland,
                                                fulfil with the help of Christ
                                                this minimum Rule which we have written for beginners;
                                                and then at length under God's protection
                                                you will attain to the loftier heights of doctrine and virtue
                                                which we have mentioned above.

                                                REFLECTION

                                                "Whoever you are, therefore, who are hastening to the heavenly
                                                homeland..." That "whoever" is the true object all this heartfelt
                                                tenderness of Saint Benedict , the one for whom he wrote! He only
                                                made one qualifier, that of "hastening to the heavenly homeland." It
                                                seems that some of our decisions about who matters and who does not
                                                have employed a somewhat more restrictive standard than that of our
                                                holy Father Benedict.

                                                "Whoever you are..." I don't care who you are or how much I disagree
                                                with you, whether I nearly hate your positions or love them blindly,
                                                it is you I am called to love, to honor to respect, to cherish as a
                                                fellow monastic traveler. You.

                                                "Whoever you are..." I surely don't care whether you're Catholic or
                                                not, in fact I am relieved and delighted that many of you on board
                                                are not! I surely don't care if you are not exactly the same sort of
                                                Catholic as I am, it doesn't matter to me. You do. You have to,
                                                because this is the Holy Rule I have embraced, that we all have.

                                                In the United States, through much of our history, Catholics and Jews
                                                shared a roughly equal amount of contempt. Great camaraderie could
                                                flourish between the two and still quite often does. Having said
                                                that, it has always amused me that many Jews I know get along MUCH
                                                better with Catholics than they do with Jews who disagree with them!
                                                How like ourselves!

                                                When disagreement happens within our family, we hurt more, it is more
                                                important to us. The differing opinion of a stranger on the subway
                                                would hardly matter at all! Maybe the fact that we CAN get hurt and
                                                angry is a good sign, maybe it means we are at least beginning to
                                                love, but it is HOW we get hurt or angry that we have to examine
                                                very, very closely.

                                                The important thing is not opinion or observance or concepts. The
                                                important thing is you. Whoever you are. Every time I fail that, I
                                                have to get up, apologize and start over. Maybe not right from square
                                                one each time, but again each time.

                                                If I ever stop doing those things, I have stopped being a
                                                Benedictine. Whoever you are, but it's not just me that has to
                                                embrace that. You do, too. We all do. I am the only one I can insist
                                                upon, however, the only one I can make change, and that might be good
                                                to keep in mind, whoever you are.

                                                Love and prayers,
                                                Jerome, OSB
                                                http://www.stmarysmonastery.org




                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Br. Jerome Leo
                                                +PAX In years past, the custom prevailed in many places of welcoming the New Year with a Te Deum of thanksgiving for the year completed and for the new years
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Dec 31, 2008
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  +PAX

                                                  In years past, the custom prevailed in many places of welcoming the New Year
                                                  with a Te Deum of thanksgiving for the year completed and for the new years
                                                  dawning. Of course, for those who have a Roman Liturgy of the Hours book that
                                                  includes the Office of Readings, it would still be the custom: the Te Deum
                                                  is said with the Office of Readings for New Year's Day, the Solemnity of the
                                                  Mother of God.

                                                  However, since many do not have access to the four volume Liturgy of the
                                                  Hours, or the one volume that has just the Office of Readings, I thought I'd dig
                                                  up a text in English of the Te Deum. This one is from 1662! It originally
                                                  appeared in
                                                  the Book of Common Prayer that year. Hence, its language is a bit archaic, yet
                                                  it
                                                  has the lovely ring of Prayer Book English. Enjoy! And please remember us all
                                                  when you say it!

                                                  A blessed 2009 to all and thanks be to God for all the gifts of 2008!

                                                  Love and prayers,
                                                  Jerome, OSB


                                                  We praise Thee, O God:
                                                  we acknowledge Thee to be the Lord.
                                                  All the earth doth worship Thee:
                                                  the Father everlasting.

                                                  To Thee all Angels cry aloud:
                                                  the heavens and all the powers therein.
                                                  To Thee Cherubin and Seraphin:
                                                  continually do cry,
                                                  Holy, Holy, Holy:
                                                  Lord God of Sabaoth;
                                                  Heaven and earth are full
                                                  of the Majesty: of Thy glory.

                                                  The glorious company of the Apostles: praise Thee.
                                                  The goodly fellowship of the Prophets: praise Thee.
                                                  The noble army of Martyrs: praise Thee.

                                                  The holy Church throughout all the
                                                  world: doth acknowledge Thee;
                                                  The Father: of an infinite majesty;
                                                  Thine honourable, true: and only Son;
                                                  Also the Holy Ghost: the Comforter.

                                                  Thou art the King of glory: O Christ.
                                                  Thou art the everlasting Son: of the Father.

                                                  When thou tookest upon Thee to deliver man
                                                  Thou didst not abhor the Virgin's womb.

                                                  When Thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death:
                                                  Thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

                                                  Thou sittest at the right hand of God:
                                                  in the glory of the Father.

                                                  We believe that Thou shalt come: to be our Judge.

                                                  We therefore pray Thee, help Thy servants:
                                                  whom Thou hast redeemed with Thy precious blood.

                                                  Make them to be numbered with Thy Saints:
                                                  in glory everlasting.

                                                  O Lord, save Thy people:
                                                  and bless Thine heritage.
                                                  Govern them:
                                                  and lift them up for ever.

                                                  Day by day: we magnify Thee;
                                                  And we worship Thy Name:
                                                  ever world without end.

                                                  Vouchsafe, O Lord:
                                                  to keep us this day without sin.
                                                  O Lord, have mercy upon us:
                                                  have mercy upon us.

                                                  O Lord, let Thy mercy lighten upon us:
                                                  as our trust is in Thee.
                                                  O Lord, in Thee have I trusted:
                                                  let me never be confounded.


                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Br. Jerome Leo
                                                  +PAX Prayers, please, for Alma, for whom we prayed, she has died. Prayers for her happy death and eternal rest and for all who mourn her. Lord, help us all as
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Dec 31, 2008
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    +PAX

                                                    Prayers, please, for Alma, for whom we prayed, she has died. Prayers for her happy death and eternal rest and for all who mourn her.

                                                    Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
                                                    grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                                    January 1, May 2, September 1

                                                    Prologue

                                                    L I S T E N carefully, my child,
                                                    to your master's precepts,
                                                    and incline the ear of your heart (Prov. 4:20).
                                                    Receive willingly and carry out effectively
                                                    your loving father's advice,
                                                    that by the labor of obedience
                                                    you may return to Him
                                                    from whom you had departed by the sloth of disobedience.

                                                    To you, therefore, my words are now addressed,
                                                    whoever you may be,
                                                    who are renouncing your own will
                                                    to do battle under the Lord Christ, the true King,
                                                    and are taking up the strong, bright weapons of obedience.

                                                    And first of all,
                                                    whatever good work you begin to do,
                                                    beg of Him with most earnest prayer to perfect it,
                                                    that He who has now deigned to count us among His children
                                                    may not at any time be grieved by our evil deeds.
                                                    For we must always so serve Him
                                                    with the good things He has given us,
                                                    that He will never as an angry Father disinherit His children,
                                                    nor ever as a dread Lord, provoked by our evil actions,
                                                    deliver us to everlasting punishment
                                                    as wicked servants who would not follow Him to glory.

                                                    REFLECTION

                                                    The Prologue is the most tender and loving of beginnings. Always,
                                                    always, always keep this loving Father that writes here in mind as you
                                                    read the rest of the Holy Rule. This and the epilogue are the key to
                                                    it all, and the key to the saintly personality of our holy Father
                                                    Benedict.

                                                    The Holy Rule can seem so lofty that it sometimes turns people away.
                                                    They think: "This is for those really holy people, not for me. I'll
                                                    bet it's easy for saints like them, but I couldn't even dream of
                                                    trying." Wrong on both counts and St. Benedict makes that clear. We
                                                    return "by the labor of obedience" and if we are not one of those who
                                                    has "to do battle" against our own will, he makes it abundantly
                                                    certain that he is not talking to us.

                                                    If, in fact, there is anyone for whom the Rule is a cinch, and I
                                                    doubt that very much, then it was not written for them. It was
                                                    written for us who struggle, for us for whom it is NOT easy, to help
                                                    us in a battle that sometimes wears us out.

                                                    St. Benedict also makes his point that our distance from God is due
                                                    to our "sloth of disobedience." Yet he doesn't tell the slothful to
                                                    quit because they are worthless, he tells them they are the very ones
                                                    for whom he is writing this Rule! This is the Rule for the fallen and
                                                    beginners, this is an entry level position which can advance to great
                                                    sanctity, but it *IS* an entry level position!

                                                    This is the door and gate for all. This is most decidedly NOT a Rule
                                                    just for monks and nuns in monasteries. Were that so, no provision
                                                    for Oblates would ever have been made. No, this is a Rule for all who
                                                    wish to try to become better and because they have made that
                                                    intention, God "has deigned to count us among His children." There is
                                                    no more us-and-them here. Just by beginning, we become part of the
                                                    whole.

                                                    How many of us who were not in the advanced reading group as children
                                                    secretly got the suspicion that the whole class was really for the
                                                    wonder kids, not for us, that we were somehow extraneous and just
                                                    tagging along to whatever was REALLY going on? Well, the Holy Rule is
                                                    quite direct about stating that this time, it is not about wonder
                                                    kids: the center of its focus is the rest of us! Now there's a
                                                    refreshingly upside down and all too rare world view!

                                                    Love and prayers,
                                                    Jerome, OSB
                                                    http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                                    Petersham, MA

                                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  • Br. Jerome Leo
                                                    +PAX Carolyn, for whom we prayed, has died. Prayers for her happy death and eternal rest and for Lynda and all who mourn her. Prayers for the spiritual, mental
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Jan 1, 2009
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      +PAX

                                                      Carolyn, for whom we prayed, has died. Prayers for her happy death and eternal rest and for Lynda and all who mourn her.

                                                      Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                                                      Leslie, who just found out her beloved uncle died a month ago, after 3 months' hospitalization for a car crash, & whose nephew, 22 months, has been hospitalized; she is also desperate to find a FT job & home

                                                      Alfred, 53, & his widowed mother, Vee, 85. Critically ill, he needs a lung transplant to survive. His mother has only the 2 sons, & is terribly crippled from decades in a sweat-shop.

                                                      Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
                                                      mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                                      January 2, May 3, September 2
                                                      Prologue (continued)

                                                      Let us arise, then, at last,
                                                      for the Scripture stirs us up, saying,
                                                      "Now is the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom. 18:11).
                                                      Let us open our eyes to the deifying light,
                                                      let us hear with attentive ears
                                                      the warning which the divine voice cries daily to us,
                                                      "Today if you hear His voice,
                                                      harden not your hearts" (Ps. 94:8).
                                                      And again,
                                                      "Whoever has ears to hear,
                                                      hear what the Spirit says to the churches" (Matt. 11-15; Apoc. 2:7).
                                                      And what does He say?
                                                      "Come, My children, listen to Me;
                                                      I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps. 33:12).
                                                      "Run while you have the light of life,
                                                      lest the darkness of death overtake you" (John 12:35).

                                                      REFLECTION

                                                      Check out the similarities of this section, at the beginning of the
                                                      Holy Rule, and the readings of early Lent, which stress that "now is
                                                      the acceptable time." It brings to mind St. Benedict's later chapter
                                                      which says that the monastic life ought always to have some semblance
                                                      of Lent.

                                                      That perpetual Lent chapter is the source of a lot of grumbling about
                                                      austerity from one camp and cheering about it from another. Both may
                                                      have missed a salient point. Perhaps the greatest element of
                                                      perpetual Lent has less to do with austerity- even the monastic fast
                                                      did not last all year. What IS perpetually in style is wakefulness
                                                      and self-examination.

                                                      Monastic life withers in either smugness or a rut. What St. Benedict
                                                      wants us to do is always to try and stay at that serious moment of
                                                      taking inventory that many of us feel at Lent's beginning. We need to
                                                      always be checking what needs to be cleaned up and we need to be
                                                      prepared, even a bit eager, to start working on it.

                                                      This is why a daily examination of conscience is so necessary.
                                                      Compline, the traditional liturgical place for such examens, is a
                                                      very apt place for same. As we prepare for sleep, which prefigures
                                                      death, we prepare also for death, by examining our faults and asking
                                                      forgiveness.

                                                      The Holy Rule, like Lent, is by no means the gateway to an easier
                                                      life, but to a holier one. As we actually grow in holiness much of it
                                                      will become easier, more natural to us. But until that time, it is a
                                                      struggle and, in unconquered areas, it remains something of a
                                                      struggle for all of our lives. What's hard about that struggle isn't
                                                      fasting or penance, but changing ourselves. Austere practices are
                                                      just a means to that end, not ends in themselves.

                                                      The whole idea of Lent and the Holy Rule is lasting change for the
                                                      better. Lent is a seasonal construct to get us to begin anew, the
                                                      Holy Rule says that beginning anew must be a daily thing. Lent is an
                                                      attempt to get us to do for forty days what we ought to have been
                                                      doing all year. The Holy Rule is a way to do what we ought to do all
                                                      year, every day.

                                                      Love and prayers,
                                                      Jerome, OSB
                                                      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                                      Petersham, MA




                                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                    • Br. Jerome Leo
                                                      +PAX Betty, for whom we prayed, has died, prayers for her happy death and eternal rest and for all who mourn her, especially her Mom, Lib. Lord, help us all as
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Jan 2, 2009
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        +PAX

                                                        Betty, for whom we prayed, has died, prayers for her happy death and eternal rest and for all who mourn her, especially her Mom, Lib.

                                                        Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                                        January 3, May 4, September 3
                                                        Prologue

                                                        And the Lord, seeking his laborer
                                                        in the multitude to whom He thus cries out,
                                                        says again,
                                                        "Who is the one who will have life,
                                                        and desires to see good days" (Ps. 33:13)?
                                                        And if, hearing Him, you answer,
                                                        "I am the one,"
                                                        God says to you,
                                                        "If you will have true and everlasting life,
                                                        keep your tongue from evil
                                                        and your lips that they speak no guile.
                                                        Turn away from evil and do good;
                                                        seek after peace and pursue it" (Ps. 33:14-15).
                                                        And when you have done these things,
                                                        My eyes shall be upon you
                                                        and My ears open to your prayers;
                                                        and before you call upon Me,
                                                        I will say to you,
                                                        'Behold, here I am'" (Ps. 33:16; Is. 65:24; 58:9).

                                                        What can be sweeter to us, dear ones,
                                                        than this voice of the Lord inviting us?
                                                        Behold, in His loving kindness
                                                        the Lord shows us the way of life.

                                                        REFLECTION

                                                        This is perhaps my all-time favorite reading from the Holy Rule. Then
                                                        gentle, loving tenderness of both the Divine Merciful Christ and our
                                                        holy Father Benedict are here in abundance. One is tempted to merely
                                                        bask in the warmth, rather than write, but I will try to write!

                                                        Lest any of us (which, as the Holy Rule would say, God forbid,) tend
                                                        to pride at undertaking the monastic way, this one deflates that
                                                        balloon in a hurry. Christ seeks US. What mercy! Our very being is
                                                        nothing but an act of His love and mercy, all that we have is His
                                                        love and His mercy, yet, on top of all that, He seeks US! We're
                                                        talking God here, not some other created being. We're talking the
                                                        Alpha and Omega, end all and be all, the First Cause, you name it.
                                                        The very force of life and light and truth and love and mercy in the
                                                        cosmos, before all time, names us, knows us and calls us.

                                                        He ALREADY calls us His laborers, even before we answer. He knows
                                                        intimately and well, from personal experience, the fouled up chaotic
                                                        mess in which we lived. He has lived in it, too. he tenderly calls us
                                                        to "true and everlasting life" and assures us that He knows the way.
                                                        In fact, He *IS* the Way!

                                                        I can gush a bit writing about the Prologue, so indulge me here as I
                                                        do so. Beloveds, for so you are to me, our fractured hearts and sin-
                                                        veiled eyes just cannot see the way, nor can we name the hurts or
                                                        their cures well. God and God alone can pierce that darkness and He
                                                        offers to do so before we even ask. This is awesome grace, this is
                                                        enough for a lifetime's meditation on humility. Hard things to come
                                                        in the struggle are real, but their harshness is in some way
                                                        illusory: "Behold, in His loving-kindness, the Lord shows us the way
                                                        of life."

                                                        It is solely because of heaven and Christ for all eternity that every
                                                        suffering, every cross can be diminished into absolute nothingness by
                                                        the greatness of the reward. Yes, He shows us the way to life, but,
                                                        as a wonderfully Dominican Doctor of the Church, St. Catherine of
                                                        Siena, taught us: "All the way to Heaven *IS* Heaven, because He
                                                        said: 'I am the Way.' "

                                                        Love and prayers,
                                                        Jerome, OSB
                                                        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                                        Petersham, MA

                                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                      • Br. Jerome Leo
                                                        +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and phsyical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Mother Mary
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Jan 3, 2009
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          +PAX

                                                          Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and phsyical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

                                                          Mother Mary Elizabeth, on her feastday and for the happy death and etenal rest of Br. Aelred Seton, on one of his two feastdays. May St. Elizabeth Ann Seton intercede for us all.

                                                          An 82 year old woman who is in the hospital after having a mild heart attack shortly after Christmas. She's doing okay, but the family requests prayers for her speedy recovery.

                                                          Some young adults who seem to be slowly falling away from the Church. Their mother (a widow) is very concerned about them and asks for prayers for all of them, and for herself, that she will know how to wisely deal with the situation.

                                                          Prayers requested for Sr. Mary Joseph all her family and extended family, for graces for them for the coming New Year.

                                                          Chris and Shawna, that controversy around needed repairs to their rental home be solved.

                                                          Ann, angina and going on retreat soon.

                                                          Lord, help
                                                          us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is
                                                          never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                                          January 4, May 5, September 4
                                                          Prologue

                                                          Having our loins girded, therefore,
                                                          with faith and the performance of good works (Eph. 6:14),
                                                          let us walk in His paths
                                                          by the guidance of the Gospel,
                                                          that we may deserve to see Him
                                                          who has called us to His kingdom (1 Thess. 2:12).

                                                          For if we wish to dwell in the tent of that kingdom,
                                                          we must run to it by good deeds
                                                          or we shall never reach it.

                                                          But let us ask the Lord, with the Prophet,
                                                          "Lord, who shall dwell in Your tent,
                                                          or who shall rest upon Your holy mountain" (Ps. 14:1)?

                                                          After this question,
                                                          let us listen to the Lord
                                                          as He answers and shows us the way to that tent, saying,
                                                          "The one Who walks without stain and practices justice;
                                                          who speaks truth from his heart;
                                                          who has not used his tongue for deceit;
                                                          who has done no evil to his neighbor;
                                                          who has given no place to slander against his neighbor."

                                                          This is the one who,
                                                          under any temptation from the malicious devil,
                                                          has brought him to naught (Ps. 14:4)
                                                          by casting him and his temptation from the sight of his heart;
                                                          and who has laid hold of his thoughts
                                                          while they were still young
                                                          and dashed them against Christ (Ps. 136:9).

                                                          It is they who,
                                                          fearing the Lord (Ps. 14:4),
                                                          do not pride themselves on their good observance;
                                                          but,
                                                          convinced that the good which is in them
                                                          cannot come from themselves and must be from the Lord,
                                                          glorify the Lord's work in them (Ps. 14:4),
                                                          using the words of the Prophet,
                                                          "Not to us, O Lord, not to us,
                                                          but to Your name give the glory" (Ps. 113, 2nd part:1).
                                                          Thus also the Apostle Paul
                                                          attributed nothing of the success of his preaching to himself,
                                                          but said,
                                                          "By the grace of God I am what I am" (1 Cor. 15:10).
                                                          And again he says,
                                                          "He who glories, let him glory in the Lord" (2 Cor. 10:17).

                                                          REFLECTION

                                                          Ever have that funny feeling of surprise that the world and time and
                                                          life and events go resolutely on, even when you are stalled in
                                                          heartbreak? It is a strange egocentricity that allows us to feel
                                                          that. I remember clearly such a feeling when my father died. I was
                                                          not quite eleven. My world was shattered, everything had stopped or
                                                          changed or been put on hold.

                                                          Child that I was, it stunned me slightly to notice from the car
                                                          window on the way to the cemetery that it was just another sunny day
                                                          for everyone else. People were working, shopping, going to school.
                                                          The world WAS going on, nothing had changed for them. It made me feel
                                                          strangely even more alone in my pain: he wasn't as important to the
                                                          rest of the world as he was to me.

                                                          We can still have these feelings as adults, but hopefully we are at
                                                          least more used to them and less inclined to think the world really
                                                          DOES stop when we think it should. Tough though they can still be,
                                                          they are reality and reality is truth and truth, after all, is not
                                                          only humility but also what Jesus called Himself.

                                                          What does all this have to do with the Prologue? The same sort of
                                                          really unfortunate egocentricity can let us think that we are the
                                                          center of the known universe in other ways, can allow us to foolishly
                                                          think that our gifts or the tiny packets of virtues we have stashed
                                                          here and there are our own. No way, folks! It is grace, it is gift,
                                                          ALL is gift, beginning with our very existence!

                                                          Everything good, in every way is all from God, not us. We dare glory
                                                          in nothing but Him, for we would be less than nothing without His
                                                          grace acting in us. Picture a battery operated toy, that someone else
                                                          skillfully made, without a battery. Beginning to get the picture?

                                                          If a city has clean, wondrous, spring water, no one in their right
                                                          mind praises the pipes. No, one praises the purity of the Source. So
                                                          it is with us, m'dears, pipes one and all, nothing more or less. God
                                                          is the Source, God's mercy and love and grace and gift are the purest
                                                          of waters. We are His conduits and we dare not glory, except in the
                                                          Lord! "Not to us, O Lord, not to us, but to Your Name give the glory!"

                                                          Love and prayers,
                                                          Jerome, OSB
                                                          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                                          Petersham, MA






                                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                        • Br. Jerome Leo
                                                          +PAX Prayers, please, for someone who is depressed, for spiritual, mental and physical well-being. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God s will is best.
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Jan 4, 2009
                                                          • 0 Attachment
                                                            +PAX

                                                            Prayers, please, for someone who is depressed, for spiritual, mental and physical well-being.

                                                            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. Allis mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

                                                            January 5, May 6, September 5
                                                            Prologue (continued)

                                                            Hence the Lord says in the Gospel,
                                                            "Whoever listens to these words of Mine and acts upon them,
                                                            I will liken to a wise person
                                                            who built a house on rock.
                                                            The floods came,
                                                            the winds blew and beat against that house,
                                                            and it did not fall,
                                                            because it had been founded on rock" (Matt. 7:24-25).

                                                            Having given us these assurances,
                                                            the Lord is waiting every day
                                                            for us to respond by our deeds to His holy admonitions.
                                                            And the days of this life are lengthened
                                                            and a respite granted us for this very reason,
                                                            that we may amend our evil ways.
                                                            As the Apostle says,
                                                            "Do you not know that God's patience is inviting you to repent" (Rom.
                                                            2:4)?
                                                            For the merciful Lord tells us,
                                                            "I desire not the death of the sinner,
                                                            but that the sinner should be converted and live" (Ezech. 33:11).

                                                            REFLECTION

                                                            People like me are very prone to regard repentance with the same
                                                            eagerness that we ordinarily reserve for cleaning the
                                                            refrigerator: "I'll get around to that..." Truth is, I rarely do.
                                                            What happens instead is that one of our wonderful Oblates, Richard of
                                                            Springfield (who gets this daily reflection,) comes for a weekend and
                                                            cleans the icebox. Hallelujah! Saint Richard!! Thank you, Richard!
                                                            Richard cleans like a dream and my world looks a lot better whenever
                                                            he's been here!

                                                            If you are not like me, and your icebox has ALWAYS been clean, is
                                                            buffed up every week to shining glory and you carry a damp washcloth
                                                            every time you open the fridge just in case, then fine, this portion
                                                            was not written for you. However, it should be noted that even
                                                            immaculate icebox types may have to check behind the icebox or take a
                                                            look at the oven.... I mean, if you want to be REALLY perfect, you
                                                            could move the fridge and wax the floor underneath- with paste wax
                                                            and a buffer, of course!

                                                            Get my point? This is surely written for most of us. Most of us have
                                                            some sort of a grungy corner that we'll "get to tomorrow," if ever.
                                                            St. Benedict is reminding us again that "Now is the acceptable
                                                            time..." St. Isaac of Syria said: "This life has been given to you
                                                            for repentance, do not waste it in vain pursuits."

                                                            Sadly, people like me hear in St. Isaac's words: "This life has been
                                                            given to you for icebox cleaning..." Yeah, right! Oh boy, what a thrill!
                                                            Such a gift! Just can't wait to get up each morning! And we shrug and walk
                                                            away. Why? Because the typically monastic idea of repentance is very
                                                            different from that of our modern Christianity.

                                                            We tend to look at repentance as necessary in proportion to guilt.
                                                            The early monastics saw it as necessary for everyone, period. We
                                                            would almost chuckle at the idea of a virgin martyr of twelve in the
                                                            Roman world repenting. "Of what?" we'd incredulously ask. The early
                                                            monastic would see no problem there at all. Repentance, from a
                                                            monastic and Benedictine view, is needful to for all because all are
                                                            fallen, all are incapable of living the Christian life without God
                                                            and grace. All of us, left to their own whims, would fall short of the
                                                            monastic struggle.

                                                            The repentance we speak of here is similar to that of Baptism, but
                                                            not identical. Certainly one can be saved without entering the
                                                            monastic way (or cleaning refrigerators, for that matter!) What St.
                                                            Benedict is speaking of here is the special road of the monastic
                                                            struggle. Plenty of saints, in fact most saints, were neither monks
                                                            nor Benedictines. Big news there!

                                                            What St. Benedict is saying is "OK, this is our approach. There are,
                                                            of course, others, but if you want to use ours, you this is what you have
                                                            to do." "Repent!" St. John the Baptist cried again and again in the desert,
                                                            and somewhere along the way of that preaching, Jesus, the Lamb of God,
                                                            stepped into the Jordan. Face it, folks, if He can answer the call to repent,
                                                            anyone can! He had no need at all!

                                                            What our repentance affirms is that we cannot become monastics with no
                                                            trouble: our natures make that impossible. On our monastic way to
                                                            God, many, many human things stand in our hearts and in our way.
                                                            That's what we repent and shall always have to repent. Whenever our
                                                            focus, our purity of heart is fragmented in any way, that's what we
                                                            have to repent.

                                                            Now, after writing this, you might safely assume that I am off to
                                                            clean the refrigerator, but you would be wrong. I mean, after all,
                                                            Richard IS visiting again soon and maybe he wouldn't mind starting
                                                            the painting a little bit late... LOL! (Richard really does paint,
                                                            though. Like a pro! Most of the new paint in the house is his work.)

                                                            All joking aside, great thanks are due to many of our Oblates and
                                                            guests, all of whom make ours a shared ministry of hospitality. This
                                                            great team effort results in people being a lot more comfortable here! Say
                                                            a prayer of thanks with me for all of them! All of them help us receive
                                                            Christ at our door.

                                                            Love and prayers,
                                                            Jerome, OSB
                                                            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
                                                            jeromeleo@...
                                                            Petersham, MA

                                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.