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Holy Rule for Nov. 12

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers for the happy death and repose of the soul of Ann Chatlos, who taught me much of what I write to you, very much my second Mother. She died some
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 12, 2005
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      Prayers for the happy death and repose of the soul of Ann Chatlos, who taught me much of what I write to you, very much my second Mother. She died some years ago, but today is her 94th birthday, prayers, too, for her dear ones, Lou, Basil, Marina, Johnny and Louella, as well as her sons and grand kids. Prayers for Scott Bernier, Fr. Bede and I are going to his funeral today. Prayers for Margaret, an Oblate who lost her husband, John recently, and for his happy death and eternal rest.

      Prayers for Darvin, he lost his adult daughter 18 months ago, now his Mother has died and he is having a lot of medical problems and fears he has lost his faith. Prayers for Mary, making steps back to the faith after an absence of some years and for her to find the job God wants her to have. Prayers for Mark, a good athlete and member of a football team that has lost all season: he and his team mates could really use the joy of a win, and for George, his father, who hopes for a joyous end of season for the guys. Lord, help them as You know and will, God's will is best. ALl is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      March 13, July 13, November 12
      Chapter 35: On the Weekly Servers in the Kitchen

      Let the brethren serve one another,
      and let no one be excused from the kitchen service
      except by reason of sickness
      or occupation in some important work.
      For this service brings increase of reward and of charity.
      But let helpers be provided for the weak ones,
      that they may not be distressed by this work;
      and indeed let everyone have help,
      as required by the size of the community
      or the circumstances of the locality.
      If the community is a large one,
      the cellarer shall be excused from the kitchen service;
      and so also those whose occupations are of greater utility,
      as we said above.
      Let the rest serve one another in charity.


      The one who is ending his week of service
      shall do the cleaning on Saturday.
      He shall wash the towels
      with which the brethren wipe their hands and feet;
      and this server who is ending his week,
      aided by the one who is about to begin,
      shall wash the feet of all the brethren.
      He shall return the utensils of his office to the cellarer
      clean and in good condition,
      and the cellarer in turn shall consign them to the incoming server,
      in order that he may know
      what he gives out and what he receives back.

      REFLECTION

      I know some houses have moved away from having table waiters, but
      something is lost in that. We have cafeteria style first portions
      here, than the waiter goes around to offer seconds and clears the
      dishes. It isn't a really big deal, but it does have a great reward,
      as the Holy Rule points out. Because we are a small community, only
      7, everyone, even the Superior takes a turn at waiting.

      Formerly, in some houses (maybe in all, but I am not sure,) the Abbot
      would wait tables on Holy Thursday. There was a nice connection
      there: he who held the place of Christ waited on all on the feast of
      the Last Supper, and washed the feet of twelve in Church that day.

      The connection here is personalist. Waiting on people connects you
      very much to them, as any waiter could tell you. Restaurants may not
      pursue that connection to any depth, but a home situation, like a
      monastery, surely does. There's a great notion here for Oblates who
      do not live alone: take turns waiting. We can get slumped into Dad or
      Mom or husband or wife always being waiter or waited upon. Switch
      off, care for each other, in this and many, many other ways!

      Serving our families makes us feel very special, a kind of special
      that I think humility completely allows. If you have children, for
      heaven's sake, teach them to cook. As they grow older, it might well
      result in a night off for you and the child will benefit. Our
      relationship with any group is hampered when we are only in a
      position of taking or receiving. To know the full breadth of love, we
      must be able to give back, in ways no matter how small.

      Tom Grimaldi, one of our Oblates, told me over breakfast at the guesthouse
      that often his Vespers is to cook for his family. I agreed that it readily is!
      Marriage is a sacrament, serving those of one's primary vocation is truly
      a holy work of prayer, if only we let it be! Tom uses Vespers tapes while
      he cooks, which has the added advantage of letting several Gregorian
      psalm tomes slip into memory for him. Now he can sing along much easier
      on his visits here!

      It is a very priestly and sacramental task to feed people. Not for
      nothing did Jesus leave us with a Meal to remember Him by, to remain
      among us as well! Not for nothing is the image of heaven a banquet.
      When we cook for (or clean up after!) our family and friends we are
      partaking in one of the fullest possible representations of the
      serving Christ.

      Love and prayers,

      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
      +PAX Prayers, please for the happy death and eternal rest of Ann. Prayers for Dorothy and for the return of her children and grandchildren to the practice of
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 11, 2006
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        Prayers, please for the happy death and eternal rest of Ann. Prayers for
        Dorothy and for the return of her children and grandchildren to the practice of
        their faith. Prayers for Joey, 40's, chest pain and failed his cardiac stress
        test, also for Marty, his worried Mom and for all their family. Prayers for
        someone adjusting to a new home and job, big changes. Prayers for someone who
        committed suicide six weeks after successful open heart surgery, for a happy
        death and eternal rest and for all those left behind.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Ann, and for all who mourn her. Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 11, 2007
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          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Ann, and for all who mourn her.

          Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following and for all their families and all who treat or care for them:

          Megan, newly invested Oblate of our Nuns, ad multos annos, many years!!

          G., bipolar, moved into a retirement home.

          Louis, in prison for drug charges.

          Eli, on death row and not religious.

          M. and P., for graces in abundance.

          Mary F., adrenal exhaustion from stress. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 13, July 13, November 12
          Chapter 35: On the Weekly Servers in the Kitchen

          Let the brethren serve one another,
          and let no one be excused from the kitchen service
          except by reason of sickness
          or occupation in some important work.
          For this service brings increase of reward and of charity.
          But let helpers be provided for the weak ones,
          that they may not be distressed by this work;
          and indeed let everyone have help,
          as required by the size of the community
          or the circumstances of the locality.
          If the community is a large one,
          the cellarer shall be excused from the kitchen service;
          and so also those whose occupations are of greater utility,
          as we said above.
          Let the rest serve one another in charity.


          The one who is ending his week of service
          shall do the cleaning on Saturday.
          He shall wash the towels
          with which the brethren wipe their hands and feet;
          and this server who is ending his week,
          aided by the one who is about to begin,
          shall wash the feet of all the brethren.
          He shall return the utensils of his office to the cellarer
          clean and in good condition,
          and the cellarer in turn shall consign them to the incoming server,
          in order that he may know
          what he gives out and what he receives back.

          REFLECTION

          I know some houses have moved away from having table waiters, but
          something is lost in that. We have cafeteria style first portions
          here, than the waiter goes around to offer seconds and clears the
          dishes. It isn't a really big deal, but it does have a great reward,
          as the Holy Rule points out. Because we are a small community, only
          7, everyone, even the Superior takes a turn at waiting.

          Formerly, in some houses (maybe in all, but I am not sure,) the Abbot
          would wait tables on Holy Thursday. There was a nice connection
          there: he who held the place of Christ waited on all on the feast of
          the Last Supper, and washed the feet of twelve in Church that day.

          The connection here is personalist. Waiting on people connects you
          very much to them, as any waiter could tell you. Restaurants may not
          pursue that connection to any depth, but a home situation, like a
          monastery, surely does. There's a great notion here for Oblates who
          do not live alone: take turns waiting. We can get slumped into Dad or
          Mom or husband or wife always being waiter or waited upon. Switch
          off, care for each other, in this and many, many other ways!

          Serving our families makes us feel very special, a kind of special
          that I think humility completely allows. If you have children, for
          heaven's sake, teach them to cook. As they grow older, it might well
          result in a night off for you and the child will benefit. Our
          relationship with any group is hampered when we are only in a
          position of taking or receiving. To know the full breadth of love, we
          must be able to give back, in ways no matter how small.

          Tom Grimaldi, one of our Oblates, told me over breakfast at the guesthouse
          that often his Vespers is to cook for his family. I agreed that it readily
          is! Marriage is a sacrament, serving those of one's primary vocation is truly
          a holy work of prayer, if only we let it be! Tom uses Vespers tapes while
          he cooks, which has the added advantage of letting several Gregorian
          psalm tomes slip into memory for him. Now he can sing along much easier
          on his visits here!

          It is a very priestly and sacramental task to feed people. Not for
          nothing did Jesus leave us with a Meal to remember Him by, to remain
          among us as well! Not for nothing is the image of heaven a banquet.
          When we cook for (or clean up after!) our family and friends we are
          partaking in one of the fullest possible representations of the
          serving Christ.

          Love and prayers,

          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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