Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Holy Rule for July 23

Expand Messages
  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for David, paranoid psychosis, sadly entwined with his religious feelings and refusing treatment, prayers, too, for Ellen, successful
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 23, 2005
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for David, paranoid psychosis, sadly entwined with his religious feelings and refusing treatment, prayers, too, for Ellen, successful liver transplant 18 months ago, now a lump on her breast and a heart attack during pre-mastectomy work-up, also for her best friend, Sandy, who donated 65% of her own liver to Ellen and is understandably distraught. Prayers for Doris, facial melanoma and for her husband and family. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! thanks so much. JL

      March 23, July 23, November 22
      Chapter 43: On Those Who Come Late to the Work of God or to Table


      Anyone who does not come to table before the verse,
      so that all together may say the verse and the oration
      and all sit down to table at the same time --
      anyone who
      through his own carelessness or bad habit
      does not come on time
      shall be corrected for this up to the second time.
      If then he does not amend,
      he shall not be allowed to share in the common table,
      but shall be separated from the company of all
      and made to eat alone,
      and his portion of wine shall be taken away from him,
      until he has made satisfaction and has amended.
      And let him suffer a like penalty who is not present
      at the verse said after the meal.

      And let no one presume
      to take any food or drink
      before or after the appointed time.
      But if anyone is offered something by the superior
      and refuses to take it,
      then when the time comes
      that he desires what he formerly refused
      or something else,
      let him receive nothing whatever
      until he has made proper satisfaction.

      REFLECTION

      Communal monasticism, even long before St. Benedict, established a
      close similarity between Church and refectory. One fed the soul, one
      fed the body, and, with reading, the soul and mind as well! Not
      surprisingly, a ritual grew up around the communal meal with its
      longer, formal, chanted grace, the silence and reading, that would
      make one think very much of Church, indeed!

      Oblates have to be very careful that they do not "impose" their
      monasticism on their families. On the other hand, all things being
      equal, it is certainly within reason to expect our families to be at
      least theistic, even Christian, if in fact they are! (If we do not
      have the blessing of a family or spouse of similar or like faith,
      then scrupulous respect for that difference must obtain.) Having said
      that, a formal grace, no matter how short, is hardly a Draconian
      imposition on a family of believers, no matter how nominal that
      belief may be.

      Silence, of course, is hardly a family option, but peace surely is!
      Cease-fire, folks! Truce! Once grace is said, every effort to avoid
      dissension and fighting should be made! They really aren't very good
      for digestion, let alone spiritual growth. Think how many times one
      hears someone say: "Oh, yeah, we HAD to say grace as kids, but then
      all hell broke loose." Don't let them happen. It inoculates most of
      the grace that prayer could bring. No prayer is a magic wand that
      forgives whatever follows!

      I have lived alone as an Oblate in the world. I know at least some of
      the loneliness and longing that goes with that. I urge single Oblates
      (and confess that I was not always clever in this respect myself!) to
      surround their dining in the evening with some kind of formality.
      Single people often fail to take very good care of themselves. Make
      your evening meal a time when you do that.

      Say or chant a careful grace. Light a candle, perhaps. Play a tape
      of something nourishing to the soul, whether words or music. It doesn't
      matter if you're eating tuna out of a can or a frozen dinner. Enhance that time
      with things good for you and good for your monastic struggle. For all the
      disadvantages of single life in the world, there are also some
      advantages! Make sure you gift yourself with the graces your
      situation does offer. Turn off the news and the phone ringer. Take
      the little bit of heaven that is there for you!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@...
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers of thanks, Deo gratias, and many years for Thomas Pio Grimaldi, making his Final Oblation to St. Mary s Monastery today, and for all his wonderful
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 23, 2006
        +PAX

        Prayers of thanks, Deo gratias, and many years for Thomas Pio Grimaldi, making his Final Oblation to St. Mary's Monastery today, and for all his wonderful family who have joined us for the day. A HUGE Italian feast for sixteen is being prepared by the family in the guesthouse as I write. The house is filled with love and warmth and laughter and the fragrance of Abruzzi cuisine fills the air! It is days like this that always make me feel that this is exactly what a Benedictine guesthouse should be like.

        Prayers for Carol and her ministry and congregation at First Presbyterian Church, and for Joey, her husband, an Army chaplain on a one year tour of duty in Korea, as well as for the many soldiers he ministers to there. Prayers for Carol's Mom, happily settling into a new phase in her life, a richly deserved one! Prayers of thanks for Nikita and her twins, Kyra and Kina, preemies. Kyra is already at home, and Kina is due to come home in another week or two. She thanks all for their prayers. Prayers for Leslie, who admitted herself to detox and is thus far doing very well. As many of you know, a lot of grace is needed for recovery. Jun asks prayers for a promotion at work sought for three years.

        Prayers for John, who tragically killed his wife, their dog, and then shot himself to death. Prayers, too, for the young children in that neighborhood, now frightened and feeling very uncomfortable living there, and for all those affected by this horrible tragedy, especially the families of John and his wife. Prayers for all who take their own lives and those of others. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much! JL

        March 23, July 23, November 22
        Chapter 43: On Those Who Come Late to the Work of God or to Table


        Anyone who does not come to table before the verse,
        so that all together may say the verse and the oration
        and all sit down to table at the same time --
        anyone who
        through his own carelessness or bad habit
        does not come on time
        shall be corrected for this up to the second time.
        If then he does not amend,
        he shall not be allowed to share in the common table,
        but shall be separated from the company of all
        and made to eat alone,
        and his portion of wine shall be taken away from him,
        until he has made satisfaction and has amended.
        And let him suffer a like penalty who is not present
        at the verse said after the meal.

        And let no one presume
        to take any food or drink
        before or after the appointed time.
        But if anyone is offered something by the superior
        and refuses to take it,
        then when the time comes
        that he desires what he formerly refused
        or something else,
        let him receive nothing whatever
        until he has made proper satisfaction.

        REFLECTION

        Communal monasticism, even long before St. Benedict, established a
        close similarity between Church and refectory. One fed the soul, one
        fed the body, and, with reading, the soul and mind as well! Not
        surprisingly, a ritual grew up around the communal meal with its
        longer, formal, chanted grace, the silence and reading, that would
        make one think very much of Church, indeed!

        Oblates have to be very careful that they do not "impose" their
        monasticism on their families. On the other hand, all things being
        equal, it is certainly within reason to expect our families to be at
        least theistic, even Christian, if in fact they are! (If we do not
        have the blessing of a family or spouse of similar or identical faith,
        then scrupulous respect for that difference must obtain.) Having said
        that, a formal grace, no matter how short, is hardly a Draconian
        imposition on a family of believers, no matter how nominal that
        belief may be.

        Silence, of course, is hardly a family option, but peace surely is!
        Cease-fire, folks! Truce! Once grace is said, every effort to avoid
        dissension and fighting should be made! They really aren't very good
        for digestion, let alone spiritual growth. Think how many times one
        hears someone say: "Oh, yeah, we HAD to say grace as kids, but then
        all hell broke loose." Don't let them happen. It inoculates most of
        the grace that prayer could bring. No prayer is a magic wand that
        forgives whatever follows!

        I have lived alone as an Oblate in the world. I know at least some of
        the loneliness and longing that goes with that. I urge single Oblates
        (and confess that I was not always clever in this respect myself!) to
        surround their dining in the evening with some kind of formality.
        Single people often fail to take very good care of themselves. Make
        your evening meal a time when you do that.

        Say or chant a careful grace. Light a candle, perhaps. Play a tape
        of something nourishing to the soul, whether words or music. It doesn't
        matter if you're eating tuna out of a can or a frozen dinner. Enhance that time
        with things good for you and good for your monastic struggle. For all the
        disadvantages of single life in the world, there are also some
        advantages! Make sure you gift yourself with the graces your
        situation does offer. Turn off the news and the phone ringer. Take
        the little bit of heaven that is there for you!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        jeromeleo@...
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers for a man accused of child pornography, and for his wife and family. Even if false, the charges alone are devastating to them all, and it is not
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 22, 2007
          +PAX

          Prayers for a man accused of child pornography, and for his wife and family. Even if false, the charges alone are devastating to them all, and it is not certain that the charges are valid.

          Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following and for all their families, all who treat or care for them:

          Thomas, 72, months-long battle with painful shingles, also arthritic.

          Andy, Vince, Dave and Marian, a very painful family situation.

          J., that she have the grace and courage to face things as they are, not hide from them, and to help those she can.

          Peter, cancer not in remission, his daughters, one recovered anorexic and the other depressed by her family's health and for his wife, who is having hip difficulties.

          Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 23, July 23, November 22
          Chapter 43: On Those Who Come Late to the Work of God or to Table


          Anyone who does not come to table before the verse,
          so that all together may say the verse and the oration
          and all sit down to table at the same time --
          anyone who
          through his own carelessness or bad habit
          does not come on time
          shall be corrected for this up to the second time.
          If then he does not amend,
          he shall not be allowed to share in the common table,
          but shall be separated from the company of all
          and made to eat alone,
          and his portion of wine shall be taken away from him,
          until he has made satisfaction and has amended.
          And let him suffer a like penalty who is not present
          at the verse said after the meal.

          And let no one presume
          to take any food or drink
          before or after the appointed time.
          But if anyone is offered something by the superior
          and refuses to take it,
          then when the time comes
          that he desires what he formerly refused
          or something else,
          let him receive nothing whatever
          until he has made proper satisfaction.

          REFLECTION

          Communal monasticism, even long before St. Benedict, established a
          close similarity between Church and refectory. One fed the soul, one
          fed the body, and, with reading, the soul and mind as well! Not
          surprisingly, a ritual grew up around the communal meal with its
          longer, formal, chanted grace, the silence and reading, that would
          make one think very much of Church, indeed!

          Oblates have to be very careful that they do not "impose" their
          monasticism on their families. On the other hand, all things being
          equal, it is certainly within reason to expect our families to be at
          least theistic, even Christian, if in fact they are! (If we do not
          have the blessing of a family or spouse of similar or identical faith,
          then scrupulous respect for that difference must obtain.) Having said
          that, a formal grace, no matter how short, is hardly a Draconian
          imposition on a family of believers, no matter how nominal that
          belief may be.

          Silence, of course, is hardly a family option, but peace surely is!
          Cease-fire, folks! Truce! Once grace is said, every effort to avoid
          dissension and fighting should be made! They really aren't very good
          for digestion, let alone spiritual growth. Think how many times one
          hears someone say: "Oh, yeah, we HAD to say grace as kids, but then
          all hell broke loose." Don't let them happen. It inoculates most of
          the grace that prayer could bring. No prayer is a magic wand that
          forgives whatever follows!

          I have lived alone as an Oblate in the world. I know at least some of
          the loneliness and longing that goes with that. I urge single Oblates
          (and confess that I was not always clever in this respect myself!) to
          surround their dining in the evening with some kind of formality.
          Single people often fail to take very good care of themselves. Make
          your evening meal a time when you do that.

          Say or chant a careful grace. Light a candle, perhaps. Play a tape
          of something nourishing to the soul, whether words or music. It doesn't
          matter if you're eating tuna out of a can or a frozen dinner. Enhance that time
          with things good for you and good for your monastic struggle. For all the
          disadvantages of single life in the world, there are also some
          advantages! Make sure you gift yourself with the graces your
          situation does offer. Turn off the news and the phone ringer. Take
          the little bit of heaven that is there for you!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          jeromeleo@...
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for continued healing for Tom s shoulder and for his wife, Kasey, having a CT scan on Wednesday, the 27th, may she be found cancer-free. Prayers
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 22, 2016
            +PAX



            Prayers for continued healing for Tom's shoulder and for his wife, Kasey,
            having a CT scan on Wednesday, the 27th, may she be found cancer-free.



            Prayers for Logan Page and for his parents and family.



            Prayers for Fr. Philip in Africa, for many graces in his vocation.



            Prayers for Tony, who is in the hospital after attempting suicide, drugs may
            be involved, and for all his family and all who take care of him.



            Prayers for Caitlyn, that she does well on all her tests.



            Prayers for the eternal rest of Brandon, 33, and Lucas, 26, two troubled
            veterans who committed suicide, and for their families and all who mourn
            them. Prayers for all vets at risk of suicide, or who are having trouble
            getting care, as these two did. Some sources say as many as 20 vets commit
            suicide every day. Prayers for the families of all and for all who mourn
            them.



            Prayers for Joe, whose cat has been missing for three days, that he returns
            safe. Also prayers for Joe and some professional opportunities he is
            pursuing.



            Prayers for C., Deo gratias that she has come as far as she has already, and
            continued prayers that she finds sufficient financial support and a safe
            place to live as she heals from an abusive marriage.



            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
            grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL


            March 23, July 23, November 22
            Chapter 43: On Those Who Come Late to the Work of God or to Table


            Anyone who does not come to table before the verse,
            so that all together may say the verse and the oration
            and all sit down to table at the same time --
            anyone who
            through his own carelessness or bad habit
            does not come on time
            shall be corrected for this up to the second time.
            If then he does not amend,
            he shall not be allowed to share in the common table,
            but shall be separated from the company of all
            and made to eat alone,
            and his portion of wine shall be taken away from him,
            until he has made satisfaction and has amended.
            And let him suffer a like penalty who is not present
            at the verse said after the meal.

            And let no one presume
            to take any food or drink
            before or after the appointed time.
            But if anyone is offered something by the superior
            and refuses to take it,
            then when the time comes
            that he desires what he formerly refused
            or something else,
            let him receive nothing whatever
            until he has made proper satisfaction.

            REFLECTION

            Communal monasticism, even long before St. Benedict, established a
            close similarity between Church and refectory. One fed the soul, one
            fed the body, and, with reading, the soul and mind as well! Not
            surprisingly, a ritual grew up around the communal meal with its
            longer, formal, chanted grace, the silence and reading, that would
            make one think very much of Church, indeed!

            Oblates have to be very careful that they do not "impose" their
            monasticism on their families. On the other hand, all things being
            equal, it is certainly within reason to expect our families to be at
            least theistic, even Christian, if in fact they are! (If we do not
            have the blessing of a family or spouse of similar or identical faith,
            then scrupulous respect for that difference must obtain.) Having said
            that, a formal grace, no matter how short, is hardly a Draconian
            imposition on a family of believers, no matter how nominal that
            belief may be.

            Silence, of course, is hardly a family option, but peace surely is!
            Cease-fire, folks! Truce! Once grace is said, every effort to avoid
            dissension and fighting should be made! They really aren't very good
            for digestion, let alone spiritual growth. Think how at times one
            hears someone say: "Oh, yeah, we HAD to say grace as kids, but then
            all-out war broke loose." Don't let them happen. It inoculates most of
            the grace that prayer could bring. No prayer is a magic wand that
            forgives whatever follows!

            I have lived alone as an Oblate in the world. I know at least some of
            the loneliness and longing that goes with that. I urge single Oblates
            (and confess that I was not always clever in this respect myself!) to
            surround their dining in the evening with some kind of formality.
            Single people often fail to take very good care of themselves. Make
            your evening meal a time when you do that.

            Say or chant a careful grace. Light a candle, perhaps. Play a tape
            of something nourishing to the soul, whether words or music. It doesn't
            matter if you're eating tuna out of a can or a frozen dinner. Enhance that
            time
            with things good for you and good for your monastic struggle. For all the
            disadvantages of single life in the world, there are also some
            advantages! Make sure you gift yourself with the graces your
            situation does offer. Turn off the news and the phone ringer. Take
            the little bit of heaven that is there for you!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • russophile2002
            +PAX Prayers for the eternal rest of Andrew P., who took his own life, and for his five siblings and all his family and all who mourn him. Prayers for the
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 22

              +PAX

               

              Prayers for the eternal rest of Andrew P., who took his own life, and for his five siblings and all his family and all who mourn him.

               

              Prayers for the eternal rest of Fr. John Grigus, OFM Conv., and for his Community, family and all who mourn him.

               

              Prayers for the eternal rest of Ernie T., and for his family and all who mourn him. Prayers that his family can raise funds for his funeral.

               

              Prayers for Sammy, a seminarian in Africa, for perseverance in his vocation.

               

              Prayers for Kerrie, she is disabled and the State of Oregon has cut off paying her insurance copays.

               

              Prayers for Austin and his Mom and family, he had a shunt put in and it has to be redone.

               

              Prayers for S., very ill with flu-like symptoms.

               

              Prayers for Mary D., recovering after a fall and very sore.

               

              Ongoing prayers for a vocation group youth retreat in the Philippines.

               

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
              grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL


              March 23, July 23, November 22
              Chapter 43: On Those Who Come Late to the Work of God or to Table


              Anyone who does not come to table before the verse,
              so that all together may say the verse and the oration
              and all sit down to table at the same time --
              anyone who
              through his own carelessness or bad habit
              does not come on time
              shall be corrected for this up to the second time.
              If then he does not amend,
              he shall not be allowed to share in the common table,
              but shall be separated from the company of all
              and made to eat alone,
              and his portion of wine shall be taken away from him,
              until he has made satisfaction and has amended.
              And let him suffer a like penalty who is not present
              at the verse said after the meal.

              And let no one presume
              to take any food or drink
              before or after the appointed time.
              But if anyone is offered something by the superior
              and refuses to take it,
              then when the time comes
              that he desires what he formerly refused
              or something else,
              let him receive nothing whatever
              until he has made proper satisfaction.

              REFLECTION

              Communal monasticism, even long before St. Benedict, established a
              close similarity between Church and refectory. One fed the soul, one
              fed the body, and, with reading, the soul and mind as well! Not
              surprisingly, a ritual grew up around the communal meal with its
              longer, formal, chanted grace, the silence and reading, that would
              make one think very much of Church, indeed!

              Oblates have to be very careful that they do not "impose" their
              monasticism on their families. On the other hand, all things being
              equal, it is certainly within reason to expect our families to be at
              least theistic, even Christian, if in fact they are! (If we do not
              have the blessing of a family or spouse of similar or identical faith,
              then scrupulous respect for that difference must obtain.) Having said
              that, a formal grace, no matter how short, is hardly a Draconian
              imposition on a family of believers, no matter how nominal that
              belief may be.

              Silence, of course, is hardly a family option, but peace surely is!
              Cease-fire, folks! Truce! Once grace is said, every effort to avoid
              dissension and fighting should be made! They really aren't very good
              for digestion, let alone spiritual growth. Think how at times one
              hears someone say: "Oh, yeah, we HAD to say grace as kids, but then
              all-out war broke loose." Don't let them happen. It inoculates most of
              the grace that prayer could bring. No prayer is a magic wand that
              forgives whatever follows!

              I have lived alone as an Oblate in the world. I know at least some of
              the loneliness and longing that goes with that. I urge single Oblates
              (and confess that I was not always clever in this respect myself!) to
              surround their dining in the evening with some kind of formality.
              Single people often fail to take very good care of themselves. Make
              your evening meal a time when you do that.

              Say or chant a careful grace. Light a candle, perhaps. Play a tape
              of something nourishing to the soul, whether words or music. It doesn't
              matter if you're eating tuna out of a can or a frozen dinner. Enhance that
              time with things good for you and good for your monastic struggle. For all the
              disadvantages of single life in the world, there are also some
              advantages! Make sure you gift yourself with the graces your
              situation does offer. Turn off the news and the phone ringer. Take
              the little bit of heaven that is there for you!

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA

               


            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.