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Holy Rule for July 15

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Sorry to be so late today, mea culpa! Some odd manner of glitch made me think it went out this morning, but it didn t, apparently. Prayers, for Pat,
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 15 5:20 PM
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      +PAX

      Sorry to be so late today, mea culpa! Some odd manner of glitch made me think it went out this morning, but it didn't, apparently.

      Prayers, for Pat, serious lungs problems, fibrosis, very worry condition, and for her family. Prayers for Janette, cellulitis for over six months now, not responding to treatment. Knee replacement had to be postponed as a result, also for her daughter, Pamela, recurrent cancer in her brain.

      Prayers, please, for Sr. Gertrude, OSB, of Holy Name Monastery, St. Leo, FL, who has gone to God, for her happy death, her eternal happiness with God and for all who mourn her.

      Prayers, too, for Alex, going to Nicaragua as an exchange student, for his health and safety and for his worried Mom. Prayers for Barbara, brain aneurysm two days ago, and for Tom, her boyfriend, in another state when she was stricken. Prayers for Jessica and her three children. Her husband no longer wants to be married and she is planning to move back to her family, but a lot remains to be settled for all. Prayers for the conversion of her husband, too. How sad! Prayers for J., a seminarian with doubts about his vocation, and for his parents. Continued prayers for Fr. Brian in New Zealand. His appendectomy was quite complicated: five hours of surgery and his recovery is very painful and slow. Prayers for Jeanne Edna, recovering from her surgery earlier this month. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

      March 15, July 15, November 14
      Chapter 36: On the Sick

      Before all things and above all things,
      care must be taken of the sick,
      so that they will be served as if they were Christ in person;
      for He Himself said, "I was sick, and you visited Me" (Matt 25:36),
      and, "What you did for one of these least ones, you did for Me"
      (Matt.25:40).
      But let the sick on their part consider
      that they are being served for the honor of God,
      and let them not annoy their sisters who are serving them
      by their unnecessary demands.
      Yet they should be patiently borne with,
      because from such as these is gained a more abundant reward.
      Therefore the Abbess shall take the greatest care
      that they suffer no neglect.


      For these sick let there be assigned a special room
      and an attendant who is God-fearing, diligent and solicitous.
      Let the use of baths be afforded the sick
      as often as may be expedient;
      but to the healthy, and especially to the young,
      let them be granted more rarely.
      Moreover,
      let the use of meat be granted to the sick who are very weak,
      for the restoration of their strength;
      but when they are convalescent,
      let all abstain from meat as usual.


      The Abbess shall take the greatest care
      that the sick be not neglected by the cellarers or the attendants;
      for she also is responsible for what is done wrongly by her disciples.

      REFLECTION

      "Before all things and above all things..." is a very strong
      statement. If St. Benedict meant that, and we must assume he did,
      monasteries and families should not only make sure that the sick are
      full and equal members, but even that they have priority. The sick
      bear a responsibility in this: they are not to "vex" those caring for
      them, but even if they fail in that, they must be borne with
      patiently.

      Let's face it, at a certain point, the sick are definitely "out of
      the loop" in human society. This is even more true of the long-term,
      chronically ill. This is, of course, very typical primate behavior-
      for a nomadic troop of baboons, it would be fine. Christianity and
      Benedictinism, however call us to rise far above such limitations of
      natural response. We are called to be more than natural. We are bound
      to strive for the SUPERnatural.

      Even in monasteries, especially large ones, the sick can be shelved
      and forgotten by some members. Rest assured that, unless wheeled to
      church or refectory, the sick are quite likely to never lay eyes on
      certain members. In this aspect, the monastics mirror a similar flaw
      in the secular world and in many families: out of sight, out of mind.
      The concerns of one's active daily life can lead to a certain
      selfishness, and the Holy Rule is trying to prevent this. We must be
      different from the world, different from that nomadic troop of
      primates. We must be more. Both Gospel and Rule, baptism and monastic
      commitment demand that.

      The flip side of this coin- and I think those who have worked in
      hospitals and nursing homes can confirm this- is that there is
      something very special about those who quite resolutely do NOT leave
      the sick out of the loop. In both monastery and world, those with a
      heart for the ill seem to be a special breed.

      I worked in a monastery infirmary for some time. I have never seen a
      mediocre monk- much less what we might term a "bad" one- regularly
      involved with the sick unless they were forced to be. The ones you could
      always count on were the holy ones: simple, humble, self-effacing.
      Prima donnas might one day wind up in the infirmary as patients, but one
      rarely, if ever, saw them as visitors.

      Oblates in the world, there is a rich field of endeavor here and you
      will hardly have to get in line to enter it. Nursing homes freak you
      out? There are adult day care programs that might be easier for you.
      I used to do four Communion services a week in such places when I was
      in Boston, and, had I been able, they would have gladly let me do
      more. When I left to come here, seven years ago, every single one of
      those services dropped to once a month or less. There is work for you
      to do if you want to get yourself commissioned as a eucharistic
      minister and go for it. These were people that not only the world,
      but even the Church had largely forgotten. The chance to do anything
      for them enriched my life immeasurably.

      Does even day care get to you? Then turn to the families of the
      chronically ill. To a large extent, they often share the isolation of
      the patient in a very real and very unfair way. Find some ways to not
      forget them, to give them a breath of normalcy and relief and you
      will find their lives, the patient's life and your own changing for
      the better. Everyone can do something, and there is plenty to do!

      Ask most people what the hallmark of the Benedictine Order is and
      they will likely respond with either liturgy or hospitality. Our Holy
      Rule's prescription that all guests be received as Christ is
      justifiably famous, as is our concern for the liturgy. However,
      another hallmark less attended to is this chapter's insistence that
      we receive and serve Christ in the sick, too. Would that we deserved
      to have people choosing between THREE hallmarks for their answer-
      care of the sick, liturgy and hospitality!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jeromeleo@earthlink.net
      +PAX Given the subject of today s Holy Rule reading, special prayers for all who care for the sick in any capacity, and especially for Tom K. and his hospice
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 15 6:23 AM
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        +PAX

        Given the subject of today's Holy Rule reading, special prayers for all who care for the sick in any capacity, and especially for Tom K. and his hospice co-workers, who are so grateful for our prayers. As a sad note, let us also pray for those who neglect the sick in any way. May God touch their hearts to repentance and conversion.

        Prayers, please, for a distraught Maronite Catholic father in California, his wife and three children are trapped in the violence in Lebanon. They have moved into the hills, but cannot get out of the country, prayers for them and for all threatened with the violence there. Prayers for Jackson, colon cancer spread to his liver, 60% of liver has been removed, but prognosis is uncertain. Prayers for Anastasia, troubled teen runaway, still missing after a month, no new leads, and for her worried parents and all those trying to help. Prayers for Karen, recovering from colon cancer surgery which seems to have been successful, prayers for Katie, struggling to get her life together and overcome chemical addiction. Prayers for Flint, seeking work, and for Br. Dunstan, SSF, returning this month to the US after many years ministering in Trinidad. Prayers of thanks and Deo gratias for Lela, on her 90th birthday, graces and blessings in abundance! Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 15, July 15, November 14
        Chapter 36: On the Sick

        Before all things and above all things,
        care must be taken of the sick,
        so that they will be served as if they were Christ in person;
        for He Himself said, "I was sick, and you visited Me" (Matt 25:36),
        and, "What you did for one of these least ones, you did for Me"
        (Matt.25:40).
        But let the sick on their part consider
        that they are being served for the honor of God,
        and let them not annoy their sisters who are serving them
        by their unnecessary demands.
        Yet they should be patiently borne with,
        because from such as these is gained a more abundant reward.
        Therefore the Abbess shall take the greatest care
        that they suffer no neglect.


        For these sick let there be assigned a special room
        and an attendant who is God-fearing, diligent and solicitous.
        Let the use of baths be afforded the sick
        as often as may be expedient;
        but to the healthy, and especially to the young,
        let them be granted more rarely.
        Moreover,
        let the use of meat be granted to the sick who are very weak,
        for the restoration of their strength;
        but when they are convalescent,
        let all abstain from meat as usual.


        The Abbess shall take the greatest care
        that the sick be not neglected by the cellarers or the attendants;
        for she also is responsible for what is done wrongly by her disciples.

        REFLECTION

        "Before all things and above all things..." is a very strong
        statement. If St. Benedict meant that, and we must assume he did,
        monasteries and families should not only make sure that the sick are
        full and equal members, but even that they have priority. The sick
        bear a responsibility in this: they are not to "vex" those caring for
        them, but even if they fail in that, they must be borne with
        patiently.

        Let's face it, at a certain point, the sick are definitely "out of
        the loop" in human society. This is even more true of the long-term,
        chronically ill. This is, of course, very typical primate behavior-
        for a nomadic troop of baboons, it would be fine. Christianity and
        Benedictinism, however call us to rise far above such limitations of
        natural response. We are called to be more than natural. We are bound
        to strive for the SUPERnatural.

        Even in monasteries, especially large ones, the sick can be shelved
        and forgotten by some members. Rest assured that, unless wheeled to
        church or refectory, the sick are quite likely to never lay eyes on
        certain members. In this aspect, the monastics mirror a similar flaw
        in the secular world and in many families: out of sight, out of mind.
        The concerns of one's active daily life can lead to a certain
        selfishness, and the Holy Rule is trying to prevent this. We must be
        different from the world, different from that nomadic troop of
        primates. We must be more. Both Gospel and Rule, baptism and monastic
        commitment demand that.

        The flip side of this coin- and I think those who have worked in
        hospitals and nursing homes can confirm this- is that there is
        something very special about those who quite resolutely do NOT leave
        the sick out of the loop. In both monastery and world, those with a
        heart for the ill seem to be a special breed.

        I worked in a monastery infirmary for some time. I have never seen a
        mediocre monk- much less what we might term a "bad" one- regularly
        involved with the sick unless they were forced to be. The ones you could
        always count on were the holy ones: simple, humble, self-effacing.
        Prima donnas might one day wind up in the infirmary as patients, but one
        rarely, if ever, saw them as visitors.

        Oblates in the world, there is a rich field of endeavor here and you
        will hardly have to get in line to enter it. Nursing homes freak you
        out? There are adult day care programs that might be easier for you.
        I used to do four Communion services a week in such places when I was
        in Boston, and, had I been able, they would have gladly let me do
        more. When I left to come here, seven years ago, every single one of
        those services dropped to once a month or less. There is work for you
        to do if you want to get yourself commissioned as a eucharistic
        minister and go for it. These were people that not only the world,
        but even the Church had largely forgotten. The chance to do anything
        for them enriched my life immeasurably.

        Does even day care get to you? Then turn to the families of the
        chronically ill. To a large extent, they often share the isolation of
        the patient in a very real and very unfair way. Find some ways to not
        forget them, to give them a breath of normalcy and relief and you
        will find their lives, the patient's life and your own changing for
        the better. Everyone can do something, and there is plenty to do!

        Ask most people what the hallmark of the Benedictine Order is and
        they will likely respond with either liturgy or hospitality. Our Holy
        Rule's prescription that all guests be received as Christ is
        justifiably famous, as is our concern for the liturgy. However,
        another hallmark less attended to is this chapter's insistence that
        we receive and serve Christ in the sick, too. Would that we deserved
        to have people choosing between THREE hallmarks for their answer-
        care of the sick, liturgy and hospitality!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Many thanks to all who have been praying for Mary and Comet, the guesthouse wonder dog. Several have asked how Comet is doing and she is making wonderful,
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 14 4:39 PM
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          +PAX

          Many thanks to all who have been praying for Mary and Comet, the guesthouse wonder dog. Several have asked how Comet is doing and she is making wonderful, though gradual progress. Not 100% of her old self, but MUCH better! Continued prayers, please, for both Mary and Comet. Mary is so grateful for your prayers and support.

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Bob, our liver transplant for whom we have prayed, he has ended his struggle. As you may recall, both he and his wife, Petrina, need the gift of faith. Continued prayers for that: it is never too late. Prayers, too, for their children, Jacob, Jesse and Justin, for Claudia, who has been so faithful in lifting him up to our prayers, and for all who mourn him. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 15, July 15, November 14
          Chapter 36: On the Sick

          Before all things and above all things,
          care must be taken of the sick,
          so that they will be served as if they were Christ in person;
          for He Himself said, "I was sick, and you visited Me" (Matt 25:36),
          and, "What you did for one of these least ones, you did for Me"
          (Matt.25:40).
          But let the sick on their part consider
          that they are being served for the honor of God,
          and let them not annoy their sisters who are serving them
          by their unnecessary demands.
          Yet they should be patiently borne with,
          because from such as these is gained a more abundant reward.
          Therefore the Abbess shall take the greatest care
          that they suffer no neglect.


          For these sick let there be assigned a special room
          and an attendant who is God-fearing, diligent and solicitous.
          Let the use of baths be afforded the sick
          as often as may be expedient;
          but to the healthy, and especially to the young,
          let them be granted more rarely.
          Moreover,
          let the use of meat be granted to the sick who are very weak,
          for the restoration of their strength;
          but when they are convalescent,
          let all abstain from meat as usual.


          The Abbess shall take the greatest care
          that the sick be not neglected by the cellarers or the attendants;
          for she also is responsible for what is done wrongly by her disciples.

          REFLECTION

          "Before all things and above all things..." is a very strong
          statement. If St. Benedict meant that, and we must assume he did,
          monasteries and families should not only make sure that the sick are
          full and equal members, but even that they have priority. The sick
          bear a responsibility in this: they are not to "vex" those caring for
          them, but even if they fail in that, they must be borne with
          patiently.

          Let's face it, at a certain point, the sick are definitely "out of
          the loop" in human society. This is even more true of the long-term,
          chronically ill. This is, of course, very typical primate behavior-
          for a nomadic troop of baboons, it would be fine. Christianity and
          Benedictinism, however call us to rise far above such limitations of
          natural response. We are called to be more than natural. We are bound
          to strive for the SUPERnatural.

          Even in monasteries, especially large ones, the sick can be shelved
          and forgotten by some members. Rest assured that, unless wheeled to
          church or refectory, the sick are quite likely to never lay eyes on
          certain members. In this aspect, the monastics mirror a similar flaw
          in the secular world and in many families: out of sight, out of mind.
          The concerns of one's active daily life can lead to a certain
          selfishness, and the Holy Rule is trying to prevent this. We must be
          different from the world, different from that nomadic troop of
          primates. We must be more. Both Gospel and Rule, baptism and monastic
          commitment demand that.

          The flip side of this coin- and I think those who have worked in
          hospitals and nursing homes can confirm this- is that there is
          something very special about those who quite resolutely do NOT leave
          the sick out of the loop. In both monastery and world, those with a
          heart for the ill seem to be a special breed.

          I worked in a monastery infirmary for some time. I have never seen a
          mediocre monk- much less what we might term a "bad" one- regularly
          involved with the sick unless they were forced to be. The ones you could
          always count on were the holy ones: simple, humble, self-effacing.
          Prima donnas might one day wind up in the infirmary as patients, but one
          rarely, if ever, saw them as visitors.

          Oblates in the world, there is a rich field of endeavor here and you
          will hardly have to get in line to enter it. Nursing homes freak you
          out? There are adult day care programs that might be easier for you.
          I used to do four Communion services a week in such places when I was
          in Boston, and, had I been able, they would have gladly let me do
          more. When I left to come here, seven years ago, every single one of
          those services dropped to once a month or less. There is work for you
          to do if you want to get yourself commissioned as a Eucharistic
          minister and go for it. These were people that not only the world,
          but even the Church had largely forgotten. The chance to do anything
          for them enriched my life immeasurably.

          Does even day care get to you? Then turn to the families of the
          chronically ill. To a large extent, they often share the isolation of
          the patient in a very real and very unfair way. Find some ways to not
          forget them, to give them a breath of normalcy and relief and you
          will find their lives, the patient's life and your own changing for
          the better. Everyone can do something, and there is plenty to do!

          Ask most people what the hallmark of the Benedictine Order is and
          they will likely respond with either liturgy or hospitality. Our Holy
          Rule's prescription that all guests be received as Christ is
          justifiably famous, as is our concern for the liturgy. However,
          another hallmark less attended to is this chapter's insistence that
          we receive and serve Christ in the sick, too. Would that we deserved
          to have people choosing between THREE hallmarks for their answer-
          care of the sick, liturgy and hospitality!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          jeromeleo@...
          Petersham, MA



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